Amberlite

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Amberlite sample on a watchglass.

Amberlite is the tradename of a type of quaternary ammonium ion-exchange resins.

Properties

Amberlite appears as clustered yellowish or orange beads, insoluble in water and solvents. Most Amberlite resins begin to break down above 60 ºC, while the best types can handle temperatures up to 200 ºC.[1]

The main frame of the material is styrene divinylbenzene copolymer.[2]

Availability

Can be purchased from chemical suppliers or online.

Projects

  • Water purification
  • Catalyst
  • Metal separation (including lanthanides)

Handling

Safety

Amberlite, like most ion-exchange resins have low toxicity.

Storage

In closed bottles, away from any volatile compounds, such as acids or ammonia.

Disposal

Unless contaminated with heavy metals, no special disposal is required.

References

  1. https://www.sigmaaldrich.com/content/dam/sigma-aldrich/docs/Supelco/Product_Information_Sheet/4802.pdf
  2. http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLiteratureDOWCOM/dh_08da/0901b803808da743.pdf

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