Ammonium persulfate

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Ammonium persulfate
Names
IUPAC names
Ammonium peroxydisulfate
Diazanium sulfonatooxy sulfate[1]
Other names
Diammonium peroxydisulfate
Diammonium persulfate
Diammonium peroxodisulphate
Identifiers
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
(NH4)2S2O8
Molar mass 228.18 g/mol
Appearance White crystalline solid
Odor Odorless
Density 1.98 g/cm3
Melting point 120 °C (248 °F; 393 K) (decomposes)
Boiling point Decomposes
80 g/100 mL (at 25 °C)
Solubility Moderately soluble in methanol
Hazards
Safety data sheet ScienceLab
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
689 mg/kg, oral (rat)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Ammonium persulfate (or APS) is a colorless inorganic compound with the formula (NH4)2S2O8, widely used as an etchant.

Properties

Chemical

Ammonium persulfate is used as radical initiator in polymerization, one example being the production of styrene-butadiene rubber.

When heated to 120°C, ammonium persulfate decomposes releasing sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, oxygen and ammonia.

Physical

Ammonium persulfate is a white solid, soluble in water.

Availability

Ammonium persulfate is sold by various electronics stores. It can also be purchased from eBay.

Preparation

Ammonium persulfate can be prepared by electrolysis of a cold concentrated solution of ammonium sulfate in concentrated sulfuric acid, at a high current density. Platinum electrodes are used.

Projects

Handling

Safety

Ammonium persulfate is a strong oxidizer and should be handled with proper protection. Inhalation is suspected to cause asthmatic effects, especially in women.

Ammonium peroxydisulfate is sensitive to moisture and will eventually decompose in a wet environment, releasing hydrogen peroxide.

Storage

Amonium peroxydisulfate should be stored in closed bottles or bags, away from moisture, acidic vapors or organic materials, preferably in a dark and dry environment.

Disposal

Heating the salt will cause it to decompose.

References

  1. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Ammonium_persulfate#section=Names-and-Identifiers

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