Barium sulfate

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Barium sulfate
Barium sulfate sample.jpg
Barium sulfate from a pharmacy
Names
IUPAC name
Barium sulfate
Other names
Barium sulphate
Identifiers
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
BaSO4
Molar mass 233.43 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Odor Odorless
Density 4.49 g/cm3
Melting point 1,580 °C (2,880 °F; 1,850 K)
Boiling point 1,600 °C (2,910 °F; 1,870 K) (decomposes)
0.0002448 g/100 mL (20 °C)
0.000285 g/100 mL (30 °C)
Solubility Soluble in concentrated sulfuric acid
Insoluble in acetone, chloroform, ethanol, toluene
Thermochemistry
132 J·mol−1·K−1
−1465 kJ·mol−1
Hazards
Safety data sheet ScienceLab
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Barium sulfate or barium sulphate is an insoluble salt of barium, with a variety of applications. It has the chemical formula BaSO4.

Properties

Chemical

Barium sulfate isn't terribly reactive, but there is a way of converting it to other barium salts. The trick is that barium carbonate is even less soluble than barium sulfate, and sulfate can be converted to carbonate by lengthy boiling in a solution of sodium carbonate. This should be done under reflux, to prevent the solution in the pot from drying.

Physical

Barium sulfate is a dense white solid, insoluble in water.

Availability

Barium sulfate can be purchased from many pharmacies.

Preparation

Barium sulfate can be easily prepared by reacting any soluble barium salt with sulfuric acid or a sulfate.

Projects

  • Make white pigment
  • Green flame in some pyrotechnics
  • Paper brightener
  • Making barium carbonate

Handling

Safety

Although soluble salts of barium are toxic to humans, barium sulfate is nontoxic due to its insolubility. This allows it to be used safely in X-ray investigations.

Storage

Barium sulfate should be stored in closed bottles.

Disposal

Due to its low toxicity, barium sulfate doesn't require special disposal.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads