Copper(I) oxide

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Copper(I) oxide
Names
IUPAC name
Copper(I) oxide
Other names
Cuprite
Cuprous oxide
Dicopper oxide
Red copper oxide
Properties
Cu2O
Molar mass 143.09 g/mol
Appearance Brownish-red solid
Odor Odorless
Density 6.0 g/cm3
Melting point 1,232 °C (2,250 °F; 1,505 K)
Boiling point 1,800 °C (3,270 °F; 2,070 K)
Insoluble
Solubility Reacts with acids, aq. NH3
Insoluble in alcohols, ethers, halocarbons, hydrocarbons
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Thermochemistry
93 J·mol−1·K−1
−170 kJ·mol−1
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Flash point Non-flammable
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
1.340 mg/kg (rat, oral)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Copper(II) oxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Copper(I) oxide or cuprous oxide is the inorganic compound with the formula Cu2O.

Properties

Chemical

Copper(I) oxide degrades to copper(II) oxide in moist air.

Cuprous oxide reacts with dilute sulfuric acid and nitric acid to produce copper(II) sulfate and copper(II) nitrate.

Copper(I) oxide dissolves in concentrated aq. ammonia solution to form the colorless complex [Cu(NH3)2]+, which is easily oxidized in air to the blue [Cu(NH3)4(H2O)2]2+. It dissolves in hydrochloric acid to give solutions of CuCl2.

Physical

Cuprous oxide is a reddish brown solid, odorless, insoluble in solvents.

Availability

Is is sold by chemical suppliers. Can also be bought online.

Preparation

Reduction of copper(II) solutions with sulfur dioxide will yield this compound.

Aqueous cuprous chloride solutions react with base like sodium hydroxide to give copper(I) oxide.

In all procedures, the color of the product is highly sensitive to the procedural details.

Projects

  • Cooper compound collecting
  • Make copper metal

Handling

Safety

Copper(I) oxide is an irritant, so avoid handling it directly.

Storage

Copper(I) oxide should be kept in air-tight bottles.

Disposal

Reduce it to metallic copper.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads