Cyanuric acid

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Cyanuric acid
Names
IUPAC name
1,3,5-Triazinane-2,4,6-trione
Other names
1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione
1,3,5-Triazinetriol
s-Triazinetriol
s-Triazinetrione
Tricarbimide
Isocyanuric acid
Pseudocyanuric acid
Properties
C3H3N3O3
Molar mass 129.07 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Odor Odorless
Density 2.5 g/cm3
Melting point 320–360 °C (608–680 °F; 593–633 K) (decomposes)
Boiling point Decomposes
0.27 g/100 ml (25 °C)
Solubility Soluble in DMSO, conc. HCl, pyridine, conc. sulfuric acid
Slightly soluble in DMF, ethanol
Insoluble in acetone, benzene, chloroform, diethyl ether, methanol
Vapor pressure 4.41·10-11 mmHg at 25 °C
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
7,700 mg/kg (rat, oral)
5,000 mg/kg (rabbit, dermal)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Trichloroisocyanuric acid
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Cyanuric acid (or 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triol) is a chemical compound with the formula (CNOH)3, often encountered as as bleach.

Properties

Chemical

Thermal decomposition of cyanuric acid yields cyanates and carbon oxides.

Physical

Cyanuric acid is an odorless white solid, poorly soluble in water.

Availability

Cyanuric acid is available as chlorine stabilizer in swimming pools and can be purchased from hardware stores.

Preparation

Can be prepared by thermal decomposition of urea. However, it's much cheaper to simply buy the compound.

Projects

Handling

Safety

Cyanuric acid has low toxicity, though it may be slightly irritant.

Storage

Cyanuric acid should be kept in closed bottles.

Disposal

No special disposal is required, can be poured down the drain in the trash.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads