Dextrin

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Dextrin
Names
IUPAC name
Dextrin
Other names
Caloreen
Dextrid
Dextrine
Fortodex
Properties
(C6H10O5)n
Molar mass 168.15·n (n=3-30)
Appearance Yellow or gold-brown powder
Odor Odorless
Density 1.450 g/cm3
Melting point Decomposes
Boiling point Decomposes
Insoluble
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Acidity (pKa) 4.5-4.7 (1% aq. sol.)
Hazards
Safety data sheet ScienceLab
Related compounds
Related compounds
Cellulose
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Dextrin is a group of low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch or glycogen, via thermal treatment.

Properties

Chemical

Dextrins are mixtures of polymers consisting of D-glucose units linked by α-(1→4) or α-(1→6) glycosidic bonds.

Dextrin aqueous solutions slowly develop acetic or vinegary smell, due to hydrolysis.

Physical

Dextrin is a white or gold-brown powder, odorless, though old samples have an acetic smell. It is insoluble in water. It has an an average density of 1,450 g/cm3.[1]

Availability

Dextrin is sometimes available in various stores as water glue. It is also available as a food additive, E 1400.

Preparation

Dextrin can be prepared by heating corn starch in an oven for 2 hours at 200 °C. Just make sure to mix it every 30 minutes or so, to even the cooking process.[2]

Projects

  • Pyrotechnic binder
  • Water glue

Handling

Safety

Dextrin has extremely low toxicity and is approved as a food additive.

Old samples tend to have an acetic smell, and may not be entirely edible.

Storage

Dextrin should be stored in closed bottles or bags, away from any moisture.

Disposal

No special disposal is required. Discard it as you wish.

References

  1. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/npgd0567.html
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EVpIOHF8Y4

Relevant Sciencemadness threads