Ethylene glycol

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Ethylene glycol
Names
IUPAC name
Ethane-1,2-diol
Preferred IUPAC name
Ethane-1,2-diol
Other names
1,2-Dihydroxyethane
1,2-Ethanediol
Ethylene alcohol
Ethylene glycol
Hypodicarbonous acid
Monoethylene glycol
Properties
C2H6O2
Molar mass 62.07 g/mol
Appearance Clear viscous liquid
Odor Odorless
Density 1.1132 g/cm3
Melting point −12.9 °C (8.8 °F; 260.2 K)
Boiling point 197.3 °C (387.1 °F; 470.4 K)
Miscible
Solubility Miscible with most organic solvents
Vapor pressure 0.06 mmHg (20 °C)
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Flash point 111 °C (232 °F; 384 K)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Propylene glycol
Glycerol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Ethylene glycol or ethane-1,2-diol is an organic chemical compound, used as an antifreeze in cars.

Properties

Chemical

Ethylene glycol will react to form polymers such as polyethylene terephthalate.

Acid-catalysed dehydration with with sulfuric acid will give dioxane.

Physical

Ethylene glycol is a colorless, odorless, syrupy, sweet-tasting liquid. It is miscible in water and soluble in many organic solvents.

Availability

Car antifreeze contain ethylene glycol, in varying percentages. Purification is complicated by EG's high boiling point and various additives present in the antifreeze. The dyes and other particulates can be removed by filtering EG through activated charcoal. Despite its high boiling point, ethylene glycol can be safely distilled at atmospheric pressure in a simple distillation setup without noticeable oxidizing or decomposing, though due to its viscosity, it may bump or foam during distillation.[1]

Preparation

Ethylene glycol can be prepared by reacting ethylene oxide with water in the presence of catalyst.

However, this route is extremely uneconomical, and it's best to simply purchase the EG.

Projects

Handling

Safety

Ethylene glycol is toxic. Due to its sweet taste it has been involved in many accidental poisonings. Because of that, many products containing ethylene glycol also contain bitter taste additives.

Storage

Should be stored in closed bottles.

Disposal

Ethylene glycol can be safely burned.

References

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HozuEkMgyoU

Relevant Sciencemadness threads