Guanidinium perchlorate

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Guanidinium perchlorate
Names
IUPAC name
Guanidinium perchlorate
Other names
Guanidine perchlorate
Properties
CH6N3ClO4
C(NH2)3ClO4
Molar mass 159.529 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Melting point 248 °C (478 °F; 521 K) (decomposes)
Boiling point Decomposes (explodes above 367 °C)
11.5% (0 °C)
Solubility Soluble in ethanol[1], perchloric acid
Solubility in perchloric acid 36.7%
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Hazards
Safety data sheet None
Related compounds
Related compounds
Guanidinium carbonate
Guanidinium chloride
Guanidinium nitrate
Guanidinium sulfate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Guanidinium perchlorate, also (incorrectly) called guanidine perchlorate is an energetic organic compound, similar to guanidinium nitrate. It has the chemical formula C(NH2)3ClO4, also written as GdnClO4 or GdmClO4.

Properties

Chemical

Guanidinium perchlorate decomposes when heated.

CH6N3ClO4 (s) → 3 H2O(g) + CO(g) + 3/2 N2(g) + ½ Cl2(g)

Physical

Guanidinium perchlorate is a white solid, soluble in water.[2]

Explosive

Like guanidinium nitrate, guanidinium perchlorate can explode if heated at high temperatures, above 367 °C. It has a detonation velocity between 6,000-7,150 m/s for a specific gravity between 1.15-1.67.

Availability

Guanidinium perchlorate is not sold by any chemical supplier and has to be made.

Preparation

Can be prepared by carefully adding perchloric acid to guanidine freebase or guanidinium carbonate. Gently heat the solution on a water heat bath, at around 90 °C to drive off the excess water until you get the solid compound. You can also crash it out of the solution by adding an alcohol. A good tip is to obtain the final product in powdered form, as large crystals are in general more sensitive and less safe.

Projects

  • Rocket fuel
  • Make fireworks

Handling

Safety

Guanidinium perchlorate is flammable and may explode. Perchlorates are harmful to organisms.

Storage

Guanidinium perchlorate should be kept in closed plastic bottles.

Disposal

Controlled pyrolysis can be used to destroy this compound.

A safer method involves reducing the perchlorate with metallic iron powder in anaerobic conditions, under UV light.

References

  1. http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/1982/F2/F29827801529#!divAbstract
  2. http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/files.php?pid=262458&aid=20665

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