Hematein

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Hematein
Names
IUPAC name
3,4,6a,10-Tetrahydroxy-6,7-dihydroindeno[2,1-c]chromen-9-one
Other names
Haematein
Hematine
Hydroxybrazilein
NSC7333
Properties
C16H12O6
Molar mass 300.27 g/mol
Appearance Dark brown powder
Odor Odorless
Melting point 140 °C (284 °F; 413 K)
Boiling point Decomposes
Poorly soluble
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Related compounds
Related compounds
Haematoxylin
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Hematein, or, sometimes, Haematein, is derived from Haematoxylin, and is a biological stain component. Its natural source is from logwood, under such name both hematein and Haematoxylin are referred to. Hematein has indicator properties, and complexes with metal ions to form Nucleic Acid stains.

Properties

Chemical

Hematein makes various complexes with metal ions. Aluminum(III) ions produce a dark blue color, Copper(II) ions produce a violet color, and Ferric ions produce a dark blue to black complex.

Physical

Hematein is a dark brown-red solid, usually sold as as a fluffy powder. It often contains traces of Haematoxylin. It does not dissolve easily in water unless the solution is acidic, but excessively acidic solutions decompose the compound.

Availability

Although rather expensive, the dye precursor, Haematoxylin, can be bought from such sources as Onyxmet. This may then be gently oxidized to Hematein.

Preparation

Oxydizing Haematoxylin will yeild Hematein.

Projects

  • Production of stain complexes for nucleic acids in animal cells.

Handling

Safety

Other than staining skin and clothing, this compound can be considered harmless.

Storage

In closed bottles.

Disposal

No special disposal is required.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads