Mercury sulfide

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Mercury sulfide
Names
IUPAC name
Mercury sulfide
Other names
Cinnabar
Mercuric sulfide
Mercury sulphide
Mercury(II) sulfide
Vermilion
Properties
HgS
Molar mass 232.66 g/mol
Appearance Red solid (α-HgS)
Black solid (β-HgS)
Density 8.10 g/cm3
Melting point 580 °C (1,076 °F; 853 K) (decomposes)
Boiling point Decomposes
Insoluble
Thermochemistry
78 J·mol−1·K−1
−58 kJ·mol−1
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Related compounds
Related compounds
Mercury(II) sulfate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Mercury sulfide, also known as mercury(II) sulfide or mercuric sulfide is a chemical compound composed with the formula HgS. It occurs naturally as the mineral cinnabar .

Properties

Chemical

Mercury sulfide is resistant to the attack of most reagents.

However, mercury sulfide in cinnabar form will burn when ignited in air, releasing sulfur dioxide and mercury vapors, which are very toxic.[1]

HgS + O2 → Hg + SO2

Physical

Mercury sulfide is a solid, virtually insoluble in water and all solvents.

Availability

Cinnabar can be purchased from various mineral suppliers. In some countries its sale may be regulated.

Preparation

Mercury(II) sulfide can be created by adding elemental sulfur to mercury metal. Mercury sulfide is the result of mercury neutralization.

Projects

Handling

Safety

Cinnabar is toxic and should be handled with proper protection.

Storage

In closed containers.

Disposal

Should be take to disposal centers.

References

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pMAfEPEHbI

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