Potassium ferricyanide

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Not to be confused with potassium ferrocyanide.
Potassium ferricyanide
Potassium ferricyanide aka Potassium hexacyanoferrate(III).jpg
K3[Fe(CN)6] on a watchglass.
Names
IUPAC name
Potassium hexacyanoferrate(III)
Other names
Red prussiate of potash
Prussian red
Tripotassium ferriccyanide
Tripotassium iron hexacyanide
Properties
K3[Fe(CN)6]
Molar mass 329.24 g/mol
Appearance Dark red/red-orange crystals
Odor Odorless
Density 1.89 g/cm3
Melting point 300 °C (572 °F; 573 K) (decomposes)
Boiling point Decomposes
464 g/L (20 °C)
Solubility Soluble in acids
Slightly soluble in alcohols
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Hazards
Safety data sheet AcrosOrganics
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Related compounds
Prussian blue
Potassium ferrocyanide
Sodium nitroprusside
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Potassium ferricyanide is an iron coordination complex with the formula K3[Fe(CN)6].

Properties

Chemical

Reaction with a strong acid, such as conc. hydrochloric acid will release hydrogen cyanide:

K3[Fe(CN)6] + 6 HCl → 6 HCN + FeCl3 + 3 KCl

Physical

Potassium ferricyanide is a deep red solid, soluble in water.

Availability

Potassium ferricyanide can be bought online.

Preparation

Potassium ferricyanide can be made by bubbling chlorine through a solution of potassium ferrocyanide.

K4[Fe(CN)6] + ½ Cl2 → K3[Fe(CN)6] + KCl

Projects

  • Classic photography
  • Ferroxyl indicator solution
  • Make fake blood
  • Make potassium cyanide

Handling

Safety

Potassium ferricyanide has low toxicity, but solutions tend to stain.

Reaction with very strong acids may release hydrogen cyanide which is very toxic.

Storage

In closed bottles, away from strong acidic vapors.

Disposal

No special disposal is required, though try not to dump large amounts at once.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads