sec-Butanol

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sec-Butanol
Names
IUPAC name
Butan-2-ol
Other names
2-Butanol
2-Butyl alcohol
sec-Butyl alcohol
Identifiers
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
C4H10O
Molar mass 74.12 g/mol
Appearance Colorless liquid
Odor Fruity, alcoholic
Density 0.8063 g/cm3 (at 20 °C)
Melting point −115 °C (−175 °F; 158 K)
Boiling point 98 to 100 °C (208 to 212 °F; 371 to 373 K)
125 g/l (at 20 °C)
Solubility Miscible with diethyl ether, ethanol
Very soluble in acetone
Vapor pressure 1.67 kPa (at 20 °C)
Thermochemistry
213.1 J·K-1mol-1
−343.3–−342.1 kJ·mol-1
Hazards
Safety data sheet ScienceLab
Flash point 22 to 27 °C
Related compounds
Related compounds
Butanol
Methyl ethyl ketone
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

sec-Butanol or 2-butanol is an isomer of butanol, mainly used as a precursor to the more common methyl ethyl ketone.

Properties

Chemical

sec-Butanol can be oxidized to butanone aka methyl ethyl ketone using Jones reagent.

Physical

2-Butanol is a colorless liquid, with a strong smell. It melts at −115 °C and boils at 99.5 °C, just slightly below the boiling point of water.

Availability

2-Butanol is sold by various chemical suppliers.

Preparation

Can be made by reducing butanone using a reducing agent.

Projects

  • Make butanone

Handling

Safety

sec-Butanol is prone to forming explosive peroxide over the course of several years, so it's best to check it periodically.

Storage

In closed bottles, in the solvent cabinet.

Disposal

sec-Butanol should be tested for peroxides before disposal. If peroxides are present, a reducing agent such as sodium sulfite should be added to destroy the peroxides, then tested again to see if all the peroxides have been neutralized. If no peroxides are present, it can be safely burned.

However, unless the waste sec-butanol is very old (at least several years) and wasn't stabilized with an anti-oxidant, there is little chance of building up a dangerous amount of peroxides. Nonetheless, a peroxide test is recommended for safety reasons.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads