Silver acetate

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Silver acetate
Silver acetate by NurdRage.png
Silver acetate
Names
IUPAC name
Silver acetate
Other names
Acetic acid, silver (1+) salt
Silver(I) acetate
Silver ethanoate
Properties
AgC2H3O2
CH3COOAg
Molar mass 166.912 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Density 3.26 g/cm3
Melting point 220 °C (428 °F; 493 K) (decomposition)
Boiling point Decomposes
1.02 g/100 ml (20 °C)
Solubility Insoluble in benzene
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
36.7 mg/kg (mouse, oral)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Zinc acetate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Silver acetate is a silver compound with the formula CH3COOAg.

Properties

Chemical

Silver acetate decomposes when heated to give acetone, carbon dioxide, oxygen and silver metal, with traces of water and other organic side products.

2 CH3COOAg → 2 Ag + (CH3)2CO + CO2 + ½ O2

Physical

Silver acetate is a white solid, poorly soluble in water.

Availability

Silver acetate is sold by various chemical suppliers.

Preparation

Silver acetate can be made by the reaction of glacial acetic acid and silver carbonate, at 45–60 °C. After the reaction has completed, cool the solution to precipitate the silver acetate.

2 CH3CO2H + Ag2CO3 → 2 CH3COOAg + H2O + CO2

Another route involves mixing two concentrated solutions of silver nitrate and sodium acetate. Silver acetate precipitates, while sodium nitrate stays in solution. Filter the poorly soluble silver nitrate, then wash it with cold distilled water, and let it dry.[1] Avoid doing this reaction in strong light.

Projects

Handling

Safety

Silver compounds are harmful and tend to stain. Wear proper protection when handling them.

Storage

In closed plastic or glass containers, away from light and acids.

Disposal

Can be reduced to elemental silver, which can be recycled.

References

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2J6V4acKels

Relevant Sciencemadness threads