Silver sulfate

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Silver sulfate
Silver sulfate bottle and sample.jpg
Silver(I) sulfate sample.
Names
IUPAC name
Silver sulfate
Other names
Disilver(1+) sulfate
Silver(I) sulfate
Identifiers
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
Ag2SO4
Molar mass 311.799 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Odor Odorless
Density 5.45 g/cm3 (at 20°C)
Melting point 652.2–660 °C (1,206.0–1,220.0 °F; 925.4–933.1 K)
Boiling point 1,085 °C (1,985 °F; 1,358 K)
0.57 g/100 mL (0 °C)
0.69 g/100 mL (10 °C)
0.83 g/100 mL (25 °C)
0.96 g/100 mL (40 °C)
1.33 g/100 mL (100 °C)
Solubility Soluble in conc. sulfuric acid
Slightly soluble in acetates, acetone, alcohols, amides, aq. acids, diethyl ether
Insoluble in ethanol
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Thermochemistry
200.4 kJ/mol
−715.9 kJ/mol
Hazards
Safety data sheet ScienceLab
Related compounds
Related compounds
Silver nitrate
Silver perchlorate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Silver sulfate is an ionic compound of silver with the formula Ag2SO4, mainly used in silver plating and as a non-staining substitute to silver nitrate. It is also used in analytical chemistry.

Properties

Chemical

Silver sulfate darkens upon exposure to light, though this process requires many hours.

Physical

Silver sulfate is a white solid, extremely poorly soluble in water (0.83 g/100 ml at 25 °C), but soluble in concentrated sulfuric acid. It is quite stable under ordinary conditions of use and storage, though it darkens upon exposure to air or light.

Availability

Silver sulfate is sold by various chemical suppliers, though it's not cheap.

Preparation

Silver sulfate can be prepared by reacting concentrated sulfuric acid with silver nitrate:

2 AgNO3 + H2SO4 → Ag2SO4 + 2 HNO3

Projects

  • Silver plating

Handling

Safety

Silver sulfate should not be handled without protection, as it will darken when exposed to light.

Storage

Silver sulfate should be kept in closed bottles, away from light and air.

Disposal

Best to recycle it.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads