Sodium chlorite

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Not to be confused with sodium chloride.
Sodium chlorite
Names
IUPAC name
Sodium chlorite
Preferred IUPAC name
Sodium chlorite
Systematic IUPAC name
Sodium chlorite
Other names
Chlorous acid, sodium salt
Textone
Properties
NaClO2
Molar mass 90.442 g/mol (anhydrous)
144.487 g/mol (trihydrate)
Appearance White solid
Odor Odorless
Density 2.468 g/cm3
Melting point anhydrous
180–200 °C (356-392 °F; 453-473 K) (decomposes)
trihydrate
38 °C (100.4 °F; 311 K) (decomposes)
Boiling point Decomposes
75.8 g/100 ml (25 °C)
122 g/100 ml (60 °C)
Solubility Reacts with acids
Slightly soluble in ethanol, methanol
Acidity (pKa) 10-11
Thermochemistry
-307.0 kJ/mol
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich (80%)
Flash point Non-flammable
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
350 mg/kg (rat, oral)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Sodium hypochlorite
Sodium chlorate
Sodium perchlorate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Sodium chlorite is an oxidizer used in the manufacturing of paper and as a disinfectant. It has the chemical formula NaClO2.

Properties

Chemical

Sodium chlorite reacts with acids and elemental chlorine to yield chlorine dioxide.

2 NaClO2 + Cl2 → 2 ClO2 + 3 NaCl + H2O
5 NaClO2 + 4 HCl → 5 NaCl + 4 ClO2 + 2 H2O

Physical

Sodium chlorite is a colorless solid soluble in water.

Availability

Sodium chlorite is sold by lab suppliers.

Preparation

Sodium chlorite can be made by reducing sodium chlorate in a strong acid solution with a suitable reducing agent, like sodium sulfite, sulfur dioxide or even hydrochloric acid. This produces chlorine dioxide, which is then absorbed into an alkaline solution and reduced with hydrogen peroxide, yielding sodium chlorite. The final product will always contain 20% sodium chloride.

Reaction of chlorine with sodium nitrate will yield sodium chlorite and nitrosyl chloride.

NaNO3 + Cl2 → NaClO2 + NOCl

Projects

Handling

Safety

Sodium chlorite is a strong oxidant and ingestion will cause methemoglobinemia, hemolysis, renal failure. A dose of 10-15 grams of sodium chlorite can be lethal.

Storage

In closed plastic bottles, away from acids and light.

Disposal

Can be neutralized with a reducing agent, like sodium metabisulfite.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads