Sulfanilamide

From Sciencemadness Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Sulfanilamide
Sulfanilamide bottle sample.jpg
Sulfanilamide sample and original bottle
Names
IUPAC name
4-Aminobenzenesulfonamide
Systematic IUPAC name
4-Aminobenzenesulfonamide
Other names
Sulfamine
Sulphanilamide
Sulphonamide
Properties
C6H8N2O2S
Molar mass 172.20 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Density 1.08 g/cm3
Melting point 165 °C (329 °F; 438 K)
0.75 g/100 ml (25 °C)
47.7 g/100 ml (100 °C)[1]
Solubility Soluble in aq. alkali, ethanol, glycerol, hydrochloric acid, propylene glycol
Insoluble in benzene, chloroform, diethyl ether, petroleum ether
Solubility in acetone 20 g/100 ml
Solubility in ethanol 2.7 g/100 ml
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Acidity (pKa) 10.6
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Sulfanilamide is a sulfonamide antibacterial, one of the earliest, now largely replaced by more powerful antibiotics. It also has some uses in analytical chemistry.

Properties

Chemical

Physical

Sulfanilamide is a white solid, soluble in hot water and organic solvents.

Availability

Can be purchased online.

Preparation

Sulfanilamide can be made from benzene through a series of stages, as seen here.

Projects

  • Make antibiotic

Handling

Safety

Sulfanilamide is a strong antibacterial agent, though lab grade is not safe to consume.

Storage

As it is sensitive to light, it should be kept in amber bottles, in dark places.

Disposal

Can be dumped down the drain or in the trash, in small quantities.

References

  1. Budavari, S. (ed.). The Merck Index - Encyclopedia of Chemicals, Drugs and Biologicals. Rahway, NJ: Merck and Co., Inc., 1989., p. 1409

Relevant Sciencemadness threads