Trichloroethylene

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Trichloroethylene
Names
IUPAC name
Trichloroethene
Other names
1,1,2-Trichloroethene, 1,1-Dichloro-2-Chloroethylene, 1-Chloro-2,2-Dichloroethylene, Acetylene Trichloride, HCC-1120, TCE, Trethylene, Tri, Triclene, Trilene, Trimar
Properties
C2HCl3
Molar mass 131.4 g/mol
Appearance Colorless clear liquid
Odor Chloroform-like
Density 1.46 g/cm3 (20 °C)
Melting point −84.8 °C (−120.6 °F; 188.3 K)
Boiling point 87.2 °C (189.0 °F; 360.3 K)
0.128 g/100 ml (25 °C)
Solubility Miscible with acetone, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, dichloromethane, diethyl ether, ethanol
Vapor pressure 58 mmHg (20 °C)
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
8,450 ppm (mouse, 4 hr)
26,300 ppm (rat, 1 hr)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Tetrachloroethylene
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Trichloroethylene, also known as trichloroethene, is an organic compound, a haloalkene with the chemical formula ClCHCCl2 (C2HCl3), used as solvent.

Properties

Chemical

Trichloroethylene is unstable in contact with some metals over prolonged exposure.

Physical

Trichloroethylene is a clear non-flammable liquid with a sweet smell. It melts at −73 °C and boils at 87.2 °C.

Availability

Trichloroethylene is sold by some chemical suppliers.

Preparation

Trichloroethylene can be synthesized by chlorinating ethylene over a ferric chloride catalyst to produce 1,2-dichloroethane, which is heated to 400 °C with additional chlorine, to yield trichloroethylene.

CH2=CH2 + Cl2 → ClCH2CH2Cl
ClCH2CH2Cl + 2 Cl2 → ClCH=CCl2 + 3 HCl

Projects

  • Extract caffeine
  • Make chloroacetic acid

Handling

Safety

Trichloroethylene is toxic if inhaled in large quantities.

Storage

In closed bottles, in dark well ventilated areas, away from metals.

Disposal

Can be neutralized with sodium hydroxide or destroyed with Fenton's reagent. Make sure you perform the neutralization outside, as small amounts of solvent will evaporate and may fill the surrounding air.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads