Difference between revisions of "Aminoguanidine"

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Latest revision as of 11:39, 10 November 2019

Aminoguanidine
Names
IUPAC name
2-Aminoguanidine
Other names
Guanyl hydrazine
Hydrazinecarboximidamide
Imino semicarbazide
Monoaminoguanidine
Pimagedine
Properties
CH6N4
Molar mass 74.085 g/mol
Odor Odorless
Density 1.72 g/cm3
Boiling point 261 °C (502 °F; 534 K)
Solubility Reacts with acids
Hazards
Safety data sheet None
Related compounds
Related compounds
Guanidine
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Aminoguanidine, also known as pimagedine, is an organic base, a derivate of guanidine.

Properties

Chemical

Aminoguanidine is highly basic, and will readily absorb carbon dioxide forming aminoguanidine carbonate/bicarbonate.

Physical

Aminoguanidine is a white solid.

Availability

Pure aminoguanidine is difficult to find, but its salts are more readily available.

Preparation

Aminoguanidine can be prepared from calcium cyanamide and hydrazine sulfate. Reaction produces impure aminoguanidine, which is then converted to aminoguanidine bicarbonate, for easier purification. To obtain the free base, a strong base, like sodium methoxide is added and the freebase aminoguanidine is extracted.[1]

Aminoguanidine canso al be prepared by reducing nitroguanidine with zinc powder in acetic acid.[2] Reaction produces aminoguanidine acetate, which can be converted into pure base by dissolving the solid in another solvent, then adding a strong base, like sodium methoxide.

Projects

  • Make aminoguanidinium nitrate
  • Make tetrazoles

Handling

Safety

There is little information about the toxicity of this compound and its salts. Pimagedine, like other guanidine derivates, has been investigated in the treatment of diabetes, more specifically diabetic kidney disease.

Storage

In closed bottles.

Disposal

No special disposal is required. Can be poured down the drain.

Gallery

References

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvh_cV8eaG4
  2. http://www.orgsyn.org/demo.aspx?prep=CV3P0073

Relevant Sciencemadness threads