Silver azide

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Silver azide
Properties
AgN3
Molar mass 149.888 g/mol
Appearance Colorless solid
Odor Odorless
Density 4.42 g/cm3
Melting point 250 °C (482 °F; 523 K) (detonates)
Boiling point Detonates
0.008393 g/100 ml (18 °C)[1]
Solubility Very soluble in HF
Thermochemistry
-230.87 J·K−1·mol−1
307.76 kJ/mol[2]
Hazards
Safety data sheet None
Related compounds
Related compounds
Lead(II) azide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Silver azide is an explosive chemical compound with the formula AgN3.

Properties

Chemical

Silver azide decomposes explosively, releasing nitrogen gas:

2 AgN3 → 2 Ag + 3 N2

Physical

Silver azide is a white solid insoluble in water.

Explosive

Silver azide is very shock and friction-sensitive. It has a detonation velocity of 4,000 m/s.

Availability

Silver azide is not sold and has to be prepared in situ.

Preparation

Silver azide can be prepared by treating an aqueous solution of silver nitrate with sodium azide. The silver azide precipitates as a white solid, leaving sodium nitrate in solution.

AgNO3 + NaN3 → AgN3 + NaNO3

Projects

  • Make small explosive demonstrations

Handling

Safety

Silver azide, like most heavy metal azides, is a dangerous primary explosive. Decomposition can be triggered by exposure to ultraviolet light or by impact.

Storage

Do not store this compound!

Disposal

Silver azide, like all azides can be neutralized with a solution of nitrous acid. Ceric ammonium nitrate can also be used.

Bleach has been shown to be effective against azides as well.[4]

References

  1. Riesenfeld, E. H.; Mueller, F.; Zeitschrift fuer Elektrochemie; vol. 41; (1935); p. 87 - 92
  2. Waddington, T. C.; Gray, P.; Compt. Rend. 27e Congr. Intern. Chim. Ind., Brussels 1954, Bd. 3, S. 327/30; C. A.; (1956); p. 16328
  3. Gray, P.; Waddington, T. C.; Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences; vol. 235; (1956); p. 106 - 119
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20667654/

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