Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Pretty Pictures (1)

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Mailinmypocket - 16-4-2013 at 12:54

Synthesis of aurin, first picture shows the phenol and oxalic acid beginning to react. Second is of a solution of aurin.


image.jpg - 81kB image.jpg - 72kB

kristofvagyok - 18-4-2013 at 10:48

Something new: 1,4-dinitro-diacetyl obtained from a really unusual reaction.








chemcam - 18-4-2013 at 11:44

I really enjoy your photos, kristofvagyok, thank you for taking the time to post them. I have browsed through your tumblr album as well, excellent work. :o

Adas - 18-4-2013 at 12:01

The photos are amazing. Could you please post the reaction? We are also interested in the chemistry, not just photos. :)

Boffis - 18-4-2013 at 12:54

@Kristofvagyok how do you get you photos to display full size instead of just a thumbnail size?

Lawrencium - 18-4-2013 at 17:14

Amazing photos kristofvagyok!

platedish29 - 18-4-2013 at 18:35

Quote: Originally posted by Mailinmypocket  
Synthesis of aurin, first picture shows the phenol and oxalic acid beginning to react. Second is of a solution of aurin.




Is that a tremendous old process for turning s**t into gold or something like turning lead into wine?

Mailinmypocket - 18-4-2013 at 19:33

Quote: Originally posted by platedish29  
Quote: Originally posted by Mailinmypocket  
Synthesis of aurin, first picture shows the phenol and oxalic acid beginning to react. Second is of a solution of aurin.




Is that a tremendous old process for turning s**t into gold or something like turning lead into wine?


Yes. Cannot tell. Secret. Sorry ;) only hint I can give is to scavenge those litter boxes and get what'cha can!

kristofvagyok - 19-4-2013 at 12:37

Quote: Originally posted by Adas  
The photos are amazing. Could you please post the reaction? We are also interested in the chemistry, not just photos. :)

Thanks a lot!
The reaction is currently "secret", it still needs to be verfied by MS and I am planning to do a real time reaction check by NMR. If this works, something new will be published soon in a journal(:

The photos are uploaded on my blog, just it's currently not published over there, here they are just linked, this is why they are in full size.

Morgan - 19-4-2013 at 16:05

Just some quartz tubing I bought on eBay long ago and I was shining a laser level light into it. I wrote a company asking if they could identify the kind of quartz it was, the box of 15 tubes having the Heraeus label on it. Each tube was sealed in plastic with a printout of a half dozen specs/tolerances unique to each tube. Basically though they were all a meter by 25mm od, 19 id. They wrote me this.
"We have found some old paperwork which I can with 100% accuracy say that part#1565 was produced for Nortel and the material is Heralux WG material. That is Flame fused natural
quartz crystals. OH content 130-180ppm, <50ppm Cl We don't produce that material any more. Now it is all synthetic F300. This natural base material was taken from mines in Madagascar in Africa."

Waveguide Quartz.JPG - 53kB

Mailinmypocket - 20-4-2013 at 10:37

Quote: Originally posted by kristofvagyok  
Quote: Originally posted by Adas  
The photos are amazing. Could you please post the reaction? We are also interested in the chemistry, not just photos. :)

Thanks a lot!
The reaction is currently "secret", it still needs to be verfied by MS and I am planning to do a real time reaction check by NMR. If this works, something new will be published soon in a journal(:

The photos are uploaded on my blog, just it's currently not published over there, here they are just linked, this is why they are in full size.


With how many awesome pictures you have you could make a really nice chemistry "coffee table book", with big glossy high-def pages. I would buy a copy :P

mr.crow - 22-4-2013 at 15:44

Apparently Reddit has a chemistry forum!

Lots of neat pictures too. I see our very own Kristof has discovered it hehe

Pyro - 22-4-2013 at 16:01

lol, If you could afford it, Any chemist in his right mind would spend the money on chems or glass. We have the wonderful viewing platform called "Internet" :D
Friends of mine go to Africa often and make a hardback picture book of every country. It is very nice, black pages with pictures and short descriptions. The actual book (not including the cover) is about 1cm thick and it costs them 100EUR to get it printed.

Chlorobutanol

chemcam - 22-4-2013 at 22:30

Here are a few photos I have taken of 1,1,1-trichloro-2-methyl-2-propanol (~2g) after 5 months of storage in the garage. The temperature was not constant, between 10C and 20C, but it was safe in a dark cabinet away from light. It is showing signs of sublimation, not nearly as bad as others I have seen at five months. I performed this synthesis very well, using ACS reagents, close eye on temperature, and I believe it is fairly pure. I wasn't expecting this sublimation though.

<img src="http://i37.tinypic.com/2zzooeo.jpg" width="800" />

<img src="http://i35.tinypic.com/29diwbk.jpg" width="800" />

<img src="http://i38.tinypic.com/uvjpc.jpg" width="800" />

This is the position I normally have it in, vertical.


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[Edited on 7/7/13 by bfesser]

kristofvagyok - 23-4-2013 at 12:28

Just a small plate of sodium, approx. 200g.


Morgan - 24-4-2013 at 05:35

What's the orange tint on the metal and glove? When I was about 15 I ordered a quarter pound I think from Mallinckrodt. The UPS guy left the package with the funny warning labels with the neighbor because I wasn't home at the time.

MrHomeScientist - 24-4-2013 at 07:12

I've noticed that on some of my sodium too. I have a smal jar of little pieces that I use for demonstrations (water :) ), and those pieces developed a yellow film on them. It scrapes off easily and looks like saran wrap, strangely enough. My large jar of the rest of my pound of sodium, which I keep sealed most of the time, has no yellow whatsoever. Everything is stored under mineral oil. I suspect since the small jar is opened more frequently, more oxygen gets in and reacts.

mr.crow - 24-4-2013 at 09:35

Sodium peroxide is yellow. Mine just has white/gray coating. That's a lot of sodium hehe

AgNO3

chemcam - 24-4-2013 at 14:38

Freshly made Silver Nitrate:

Pyro - 24-4-2013 at 15:33

How the hall did you dry that?! Mine has been in a dessicator for 2 months and it's still wet as hell.

chemcam - 24-4-2013 at 17:30

Quote: Originally posted by Pyro  
How the hall did you dry that?! Mine has been in a dessicator for 2 months and it's still wet as hell.


I had the wet silver nitrate on top of a square piece of thick glass that I put on top of a pot with boiling water in it, I angled the glass so that there were 4 openings for steam to vent out therefore not heating the AgNO3 too much. Also, in the beginning I used a little excess HNO3 to dissolve all the silver, then I let it sit over night, I steam dried it next morning being careful not to dry it all the way. It was basically dry two hours after that.
____________________

Here is another nice picture, I spilled some molten lead on the garage floor, this is the result:

____________________

This is a photo of silver acetylide detonating:


[Edited on 4-25-2013 by chemcam]

Adas - 25-4-2013 at 07:00

The lead must have contained some copper, which is known to create those rainbow colors. Or can other metals do this as well?

mr.crow - 25-4-2013 at 07:45

Quote: Originally posted by Pyro  
How the hall did you dry that?! Mine has been in a dessicator for 2 months and it's still wet as hell.


I used NaOH as a dessicant and it worked fine. Also absorbs the extra acid fumes

watson.fawkes - 25-4-2013 at 09:54

Quote: Originally posted by Adas  
The lead must have contained some copper, which is known to create those rainbow colors. Or can other metals do this as well?
It's called thin-film interference and occurs with oxide layers of most metals.

mr.crow - 25-4-2013 at 12:10

Looks just like Bismuth :)

Depending on where the lead comes from it could have any sort of alloying agents in it

kristofvagyok - 25-4-2013 at 14:21

Something interesting with film interference:



I had made a reaction in an ionic liquid and after it I have extracted it with toluene. After a while the flask looked like this and between the two phase there was a rainbow like film as seen on the picture. Anyone ever seen such a thing?

Thin film interference is common at the surface of metals (e.g.: bismuth) and with some organics on the surface of water as everyone knows, but I have never heard and never seen it before between two massive layers.

watson.fawkes - 25-4-2013 at 17:38

Quote: Originally posted by kristofvagyok  
Thin film interference is common at the surface of metals (e.g.: bismuth) and with some organics on the surface of water as everyone knows, but I have never heard and never seen it before between two massive layers.
I think you should be able to conclude that there's a third, very thin layer between the two. You need two boundary changes to get interference.

It would be a good demonstration, though, to make something replicable and stable along these lines. You'd need three liquids, all mutually immiscible, and yet able to wet each other. Just a fraction of a drop of the middle-density liquid would do it.

blogfast25 - 26-4-2013 at 05:33

Are you sure what you're seeing isn't simply the meniscus of the bottom liquid? You claim to see a rainbow but I find it hard to see... One way to resolve it is to pour the liquids into a narrow cylindrical container, that should definitely reveal any third phase.

[Edited on 26-4-2013 by blogfast25]

smaerd - 27-4-2013 at 06:22

Thermochromic properties of bis(diethylammino) tetrachlorocuprate(II)

Green color at room temperature
Yellow color at >50*C(heated by a space-heater)

Taken from a melting point capillary with 20x zoom.

Green.JPG - 100kB Yellow.JPG - 62kB

[Edited on 27-4-2013 by smaerd]

Bismuth Crystallization

togipaw - 27-4-2013 at 12:57

Goofing around with Bismuth. Not the classic example of hopper crystals but I like how it turned out.

BismuthRing.jpg - 544kB

chemcam - 28-4-2013 at 13:38

1g etn before recrystallization:


[Edited on 4-28-2013 by chemcam]

elementcollector1 - 28-4-2013 at 14:09

1g of what?

plante1999 - 28-4-2013 at 15:52

I was wondering too, but not daring enough to ask.

Lets see, 1g of puryfied white powder. If it was not on a chemistry forum...

[Edited on 28-4-2013 by plante1999]

[Edited on 29-4-2013 by plante1999]

chemcam - 28-4-2013 at 17:05

Haha I left the name out to see if anyone thought cocaine. But its ETN. I have it recrystallized now but I'm having a hard time taking a close up shot of the needle like structure. It blurs together and just looks like a clear mass of crystals.

1g etn after recrystallization:


[Edited on 4-29-2013 by chemcam]

nezza - 29-4-2013 at 01:27

Here's a couple of pictures of some selenium dioxide I prepared recently. The sublimed oxide gives some nice (Toxic) needle like crystals. The SeO2 was prepared from elemental selenium using nitric acid.

Selenium dioxide.jpg - 77kB Selenium dioxide2.jpg - 75kB

chemcam - 29-4-2013 at 08:53

Very nice pictures, did you photograph on a mirror like I have been? You must have an excellent camera to take such detailed close-ups!

DraconicAcid - 29-4-2013 at 08:56

Quote: Originally posted by smaerd  
Thermochromic properties of bis(diethylammino) tetrachlorocuprate(II)

Green color at room temperature
Yellow color at >50*C(heated by a space-heater)

Taken from a melting point capillary with 20x zoom.

Very cool- how did you make it?

smaerd - 29-4-2013 at 12:38

Synthesis of the Thermochromic Compound
1.35g(0.00791mol) of Copper(II) chloride dihydrate was weighed and added to a beaker containing 3.0mL of denatured ethanol. 2.18g(0.0198mol) of diethylamine hydrochloride was weighed and added to 15.0mL isopropanol in a separate beaker. Both solutions were covered with a watch glass and gently warmed on a hot-plate until the solids were no longer visible. While warm the ethanolic solution was poured into the diethylamine hydrochloride solution. The beaker was rinsed with warm ethanol and the rinses were transferred to the solution.
The solution was allowed to cool to room-temperature then chilled in a ice bath. A flock of glistening particles were visible. Scratching and 20 minutes of resting in an ice-bath did not induce crystallization. The beaker was boiled on a hot-plate with stirring to remove about a fifth of it's volume. On heating the solution turned from emerald green to an amber brown. The brown solution was cooled and it returned to a green color. Fifteen minutes in an ice-bath with scratching did not induce crystallization. The solution was left to evaporate for five days.
An orange viscous oil remained without alcoholic odor. 3.0mL of isopropanol was added to the solution. No parafilm was available to move the solution to the lab freezer, so the solution was again left to evaporate for two days.
To the oil 2mL of chilled isopropanol was added. The solution was chilled in an ice-bath. A seed crystal was added. Immediate crystallization occurred yielding a slushy green solid. The solid was vacuum filtered and rinsed with chilled isopropanol. The solid was dried between two pieces of filter paper supported by dry paper towels. 0.52g(0.0021mol, 26.92%) of product was obtained.
---------------------------
If I were to repeat the experiment I would use stoichiometric amounts of cupric chloride and diethylamine HCl which is what the publication's recommend(note two moles diethylamine hcl for one mole of cupric chloride produces one mole of complex). The anhydrous cupric chloride is preferred because there is evidence to suggest the compound irreversibly hydrolyzes after prolonged exposure to water. Most of the time there isn't this big a problem with the crystallization it's likely that the excess diethylamine hcl(known to recrystallize from ethanol) inhibited this and/or the solvents were not dry enough.

I would also not try to boil the solution down(If the crystallization failed). A slow evaporation seems to work fine for yielding a solid mass which can be rinsed with isopropyl alcohol on a vacuum filter.

Also the complex can be crashed from the solution using diethyl ether rather then crystallizing(which I guess is still crystallization).

Also note, anhydrous diethylamine HCl can be prepared from the free amine and hydrogen chloride(the gas). The fluffy white solid forms almost instantly on exposure to the gas. Interesting to watch. It can be recrystallized from ethanol if necessary.

[Edited on 29-4-2013 by smaerd]

[Edited on 29-4-2013 by smaerd]

DraconicAcid - 29-4-2013 at 12:59

Quote: Originally posted by smaerd  
Synthesis of the Thermochromic Compound
1.35g(0.00791mol) of Copper(II) chloride dihydrate was weighed and added to a beaker containing 3.0mL of denatured ethanol. 2.18g(0.0198mol) of diethylamine hydrochloride was weighed and added to 15.0mL isopropanol....


Thanks for that. I don't have any diethylamine (or the hydrochloride); I wonder if tetraethylammonium chloride would work similarly.

I think the correct name would be diethylammonium tetrachlorocuprate(II), since the diethylammonium is a counterion, not a diethylamino ligand.

smaerd - 29-4-2013 at 13:02

The author of this publication doesn't share that naming convention :)

It's kind of an unconventional compound as the hydrogen bonding from the cation highly influences the inner sphere geometry(hence the thermochromism)

Thermochromism in copper(II) halide salts. 4. Bis(diethylammonium)tetrachlorocuprate(II), structure of the high-temperature phase and physical characterization of its two phases
Darrell R. Bloomquist, Mark R. Pressprich, and Roger D. Willett
Journal of the American Chemical Society 1988 110 (22), 7391-7398

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ja00230a020

[Edited on 29-4-2013 by smaerd]

Capsaicinoid Extraction, Step One

chemcam - 2-5-2013 at 15:48

I am getting ready to extract the capsaicinoids from a bunch of habanero peppers. The picture is of the chopped up peppers drying out (2nd day). I will post new pics as I complete more of the extraction since it takes multiple days to complete each step.




If it comes out nicely I will make a thread in pre-publications compete with photos and step-by-step instructions.

Potassium Ferrocyanide?

chemcam - 3-5-2013 at 19:42

This is a pretty picture but I have a question also. I ordered 125g potassium ferrocyanide and the bottle says that but I was expecting yellow crystals. Do you think they accidentally bottled ferricyanide or is this correct color for lab grade?

<img src="http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t573/chemcamtv/Chemistry/IMG_20130503_201753_566_zps74977b80.jpg" width="800" />

(edit)

When I smash up the crystals I get bright lemon yellow.

[Edited on 5-4-2013 by chemcam]

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Mixell - 3-5-2013 at 19:53

Yea, that's ferricyanide right there.

binaryclock - 3-5-2013 at 20:14

No, those look like cherry pop candy from the 80s!

Eddygp - 4-5-2013 at 04:16

Almost certainly potassium ferricyanide. Bad luck.

Boffis - 4-5-2013 at 09:35

Yes that's potassium ferricyanide or possibly nitroprusside, its about that colour too. But where did you buy it? I'd be very worried about buying anything again from them as that's a pretty fundamental error. Imagine the mixed up compounds were both say white there's the potential for a serious incident.

chemcam - 4-5-2013 at 09:56

Quote: Originally posted by Boffis  
Yes that's potassium ferricyanide or possibly nitroprusside, its about that colour too. But where did you buy it? I'd be very worried about buying anything again from them as that's a pretty fundamental error. Imagine the mixed up compounds were both say white there's the potential for a serious incident.


This is a very large company, I have bought a lot of stuff from them and never had any problems but next time I go there I will definitely bring it up. I would say if its wrong it the equivalent of a pharmacist dispensing the wrong pills.

I still am not certain what it is. When I smash the crystals up they go lemon bright yellow and stain white paper yellow. I am having trouble finding info on the ferro and ferricyanides does anyone have a test I could perform to be absolutely sure or good literature? I don't have access to references. I was going to make Prussian blue but I read both ferro and ferri can make it.

[Edited on 5-4-2013 by chemcam]

Boffis - 4-5-2013 at 11:08

Use ferric chloride/sulphate; a blue coloured ppt indicate ferrocyanide (Turnbulls = Prussian blue). Ferricyanide don't ppt unless very concentrated if I recall correctly.

With ferrous salts (if very pure) you get a white ppt but it rapidly turns blue through oxidation

Ferricyanide often react with redox indicators eg starch iodide, tolidine etc

Nitroprussides give an intense purple colour with alkali sulphides and a pinkish colour with alkali sulphites (not metabisulphites).

Nitroprussides also give coloured reaction with many organic chemical and in the past was widely used to test for some of them.

elementcollector1 - 4-5-2013 at 12:43

Quote: Originally posted by chemcam  


When I smash up the crystals I get bright lemon yellow.

[Edited on 5-4-2013 by chemcam]

Maybe the outer surface oxidised to ferricyanide?

cyanureeves - 4-5-2013 at 16:46

i thought chlorine made ferricyanide from ferrocyanide and also isnt ferricyanide more expensive?

Boffis - 4-5-2013 at 17:25

Ferrocyanide when finely ground is almost colourless but ferricyanide and nitroprusside are darker yellow to yellow-orange depending on particle size.

kristofvagyok - 5-5-2013 at 04:57

Refining some palladium from 10% Pd/C with aqua regia:



-this color was always one of my favorites(:

Adas - 5-5-2013 at 07:52

Beautiful. Looks like... a strawberry juice :D

S.C. Wack - 5-5-2013 at 09:50

...so, so envious

...
Quote: Originally posted by chemcam  
does anyone have a test I could perform to be absolutely sure


Water. Solutions of the ferrocyanide are of course pure yellow.

One who gets ferricyanide for the ferrocyanide price should inquire about larger quantities.

chemcam - 5-5-2013 at 10:28

In water it becomes bright yellow. So then the label is correct and I am happy. Ferrocyanide is it.

Why do you suppose it is the exact color of the ferricyanide until I grind it up a bit? Do larger crystals appear darker due to light or something?

garage chemist - 5-5-2013 at 10:31

I have some crystalline ferrocyanide and it is pure yellow even with a crystal size of several millimeters.
The red ferricyanide gives a yellow solution in water! You definitely have ferricyanide, contact your supplier and complain!

S.C. Wack - 5-5-2013 at 11:22

Well, IMHO there is a apple-green note in mine...yes my statement was not correct...it's more that one is much darker and more electric...ferrocyanide is pale and plain.

Endimion17 - 5-5-2013 at 11:50

How can you stand using such obsolete terminology? Ferrocyanide and ferricyanide... It was invented by the devil himself to make people angry. :D
Hexacyanoferrate(II) and hexacyanoferrate(III). Meaningful, informative and systematic.

chemcam - 5-5-2013 at 13:08

Quote: Originally posted by Endimion17  
How can you stand using such obsolete terminology? Ferrocyanide and ferricyanide... It was invented by the devil himself to make people angry. :D
Hexacyanoferrate(II) and hexacyanoferrate(III). Meaningful, informative and systematic.


On forums I try to use the most common terms so people understand what I am saying and don't have to decipher each word one by one. But anyway, so far I have gotten conflicting information about how to figure out what I have. I think what I will do is just bring back the bottle to my chem supply warehouse and ask them if they made a mistake.

Sublimatus - 6-5-2013 at 14:43



Taking a shot at isolating potassium via that strange reaction of Mg, KOH, and t-butanol.

Oscilllator - 9-5-2013 at 01:15

Quote: Originally posted by Sublimatus  


Taking a shot at isolating potassium via that strange reaction of Mg, KOH, and t-butanol.


Oh dear, I wouldn't use a 3-necked flask for that. Apparently the KOH corrodes the glass quite rapidly. Better to use an el-cheapo erlenmeyer or something

MrHomeScientist - 9-5-2013 at 05:47

I think just about everyone's experience has been the opposite, actually - little to no corrosion. I've done it 3 times myself now, and no visible effect on my glassware. I suppose there could be a tiny amount of etching, but if there is it's very slow.

chemcam - 10-5-2013 at 13:10

Finally got a good picture of the etn needle-like crystals!!


ItalianChemist - 14-5-2013 at 11:43

Some nice complexes I have recently made!
-Bis(dibenzoylmethane)Uranyl
1.JPG - 43kB
-Tris(acetylacetonate)Iron
2.JPG - 54kB
And some crystals of sodium sulfate!

3.JPG - 127kB

[Edited on 14-5-2013 by ItalianChemist]

Bezaleel - 16-5-2013 at 03:20

Is the Tris(acetylacetonate)Iron hygroscopic?
Looks nice, with a funny colour somewhere between brown and red.

Mailinmypocket - 16-5-2013 at 06:19

Some 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) which was recrystallized from vitamin supplement capsules. Absolutely amazing to watch them grow in solution, like massive cactus-like pods of crystals. Very easy to separate from the other ingredients in the capsules (magnesium stearate, stearic acid, silica). Also is a picture of the second batch of crystals that just started to form, sadly when I moved the beaker the layer of crystals floating on the surface fell down :(

image.jpg - 118kB image.jpg - 88kB

[Edited on 16-5-2013 by Mailinmypocket]

Hexavalent - 16-5-2013 at 10:15

A nice little crystal of bismuth, it measures ~30x30 mm2 :)

<img src="https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/217362_512463482136206_64663793_n.jpg" width="800" />

[Edited on 16-5-2013 by Hexavalent]

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chemcam - 16-5-2013 at 22:36

Thought you guys might enjoy this picture.


It looks as if my watch glass has a big hole in it, but, it's actually crystals of hexamine forming. Photographed from the bottom side.

Antiswat - 17-5-2013 at 05:05

K2SO4 crystals from NC synthesis
<img src="http://i.imgur.com/zGZ1xFP.jpg" width="800" />

Na2Cr2O7, i think this picture gets the red almost glowing flouroscent red this gives.. very deep and pretty
<img src="http://i.imgur.com/i7bC4cX.jpg" width="800" />

my favorite above all.. not only does it have incredibly many possibilities for one compound but its also pretty by itself
<img src="http://i.imgur.com/23SjeM3.jpg" width="800" />

another CuCl2 picture, from my mobile phone
<img src="http://i.imgur.com/ZV96Sez.jpg" width="800" />

sorry if the pictures fills 10 times this page :S

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[Edited on 7/7/13 by bfesser]

Finnnicus - 17-5-2013 at 06:55

AGH! Resize please!!!!11!!!!11!!!!1

ItalianChemist - 17-5-2013 at 09:41

Quote: Originally posted by Bezaleel  
Is the Tris(acetylacetonate)Iron hygroscopic?

I don't think it's hygroscopic!

Bromine Water

chemcam - 17-5-2013 at 19:19


Antiswat - 18-5-2013 at 13:37

Quote: Originally posted by Finnnicus  
AGH! Resize please!!!!11!!!!11!!!!1


i tried searching around, last times i tried whole SM literally crashed :S
didnt find much of use.. if you care to watch them hold ctrl and scroll back on mousewheel or press ''-''

is there any simple way to resize?

kristofvagyok - 18-5-2013 at 14:00



When you have no access to the NMR at the moment, but it's important to know that the nitration was successful or not.

As it could be seen, it was successful :D

Lambda-Eyde - 18-5-2013 at 14:45

Quote: Originally posted by Antiswat  
Quote: Originally posted by Finnnicus  
AGH! Resize please!!!!11!!!!11!!!!1


i tried searching around, last times i tried whole SM literally crashed :S
didnt find much of use.. if you care to watch them hold ctrl and scroll back on mousewheel or press ''-''

is there any simple way to resize?

Open them in Paint, press ctrl+W, resize as you wish. Save the picture.

mayko - 19-5-2013 at 17:31



bismuth precipitation.jpg - 69kB

A bismuth chloride solution precipitating on aluminum foil. I think that the depth of field came out nicely in this snap.



microzapped_tollens.jpg - 81kB

I plated a glass vial with silver via a Tollens reaction, then did what any sensible person would do: tossed that sucker in the microwave! After a few seconds, this pattern, like an ant's nest, had appeared in the coating.




NiNH4C2O4.jpg - 79kB

Ammonia complex of nickle oxalate, diffusing gracefully through some filter paper.

kristofvagyok - 20-5-2013 at 01:29



Some nice crystals of my compound under UV right after recrystallization.

Have You seen my portfoio? It’s over here: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/tagged/portfolio

Finnnicus - 20-5-2013 at 02:05

Quote: Originally posted by Antiswat  


i tried searching around, last times i tried whole SM literally crashed :S
didnt find much of use.. if you care to watch them hold ctrl and scroll back on mousewheel or press ''-''

is there any simple way to resize?


Sorry I'm on my phone, as always. It's just very annoying.
Why not restrict the image in the bb tags?

KernelPicnic - 24-5-2013 at 16:29

AgMnO4.png - 718kB

Freshly prepared silver permanganate.

mr.crow - 25-5-2013 at 11:27

Here is an actual picture of an electron cloud

<img src="http://i.imgur.com/cVwIso2.jpg" width="800" />

Source Here and Here. Found this on reddit

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[Edited on 7/7/13 by bfesser]

elementcollector1 - 26-5-2013 at 19:43

I didn't think the Bohr model was this accurate.

Vargouille - 28-5-2013 at 11:47

Well, it's just a hydrogen atom. Look at pictures of the rest of the orbitals, it's pretty wacky.

DrSchnufflez - 30-5-2013 at 02:43

The quality is not that great but here is a photo of a vial of freshly recrystalized copper tetramine nitrate. :)

DrSchnufflez - 30-5-2013 at 02:44

Sorry, the file didn't upload.

image.jpg - 117kB

DraconicAcid - 30-5-2013 at 08:55

Quote: Originally posted by elementcollector1  
I didn't think the Bohr model was this accurate.

That doesn't follow the Bohr model- if it did, there'd just be the outer ring, and nothing inside it. That's one of the s orbitals, with radial nodes separating the outer ring from the stuff inside.

ZeroHour - 2-6-2013 at 23:30

Quote: Originally posted by Antiswat  
K2SO4 crystals from NC synthesis


Na2Cr2O7, i think this picture gets the red almost glowing flouroscent red this gives.. very deep and pretty


my favorite above all.. not only does it have incredibly many possibilities for one compound but its also pretty by itself


another CuCl2 picture, from my mobile phone


sorry if the pictures fills 10 times this page :S


Are you using Coca Cola glasses to hold your CuCl2? I wouldn't drink from that again!

Squall181 - 3-6-2013 at 19:31

ZnS:Mn under UV light
ZnS-Mn.jpg - 68kB

Prince Rupert's Drop
Prince_Rupertos-2.jpg - 303kB

Took my UV flashlight into the backyard and found these centipedes running about
CIMG0895.jpg - 70kB

chemcam - 3-6-2013 at 21:06

Quote: Originally posted by Squall181  

Took my UV flashlight into the backyard and found these centipedes running about


That is incredible! I have never seen anything like that. What other critters glow like that, if any?

Endimion17 - 4-6-2013 at 06:24

I had no idea centipedes are UV fluorescent. Scorpions are known to be glowing, but centipedes... I remember illuminating them, but never saw any glow. Maybe it's only a certain species that glows like this?

The photo is kind of creepy. I don't like those things much, and when they glow, it's like a horror SF. :)

[Edited on 4-6-2013 by Endimion17]

Squall181 - 4-6-2013 at 18:50

Yeah I had never seen these things before. So I was pretty surprised and amazed when I saw them fluoresce. It seems there is something in their exoskeleton that fluoresces, because I found small ring sections of dead centipedes that still gave off a blue glow under uv.


Endimion17 - 4-6-2013 at 19:00

It's some kind of a protein(s) that fluoresce when being oxidized in a particular way. Fresh scorpion's cuticle is not UVA fluorescent. It takes some time until it hardens. The oxidized protein (or oligopeptide perhaps?) is supposedly soluble in ethanol.
Interesting enough, scorpions give off cyan-greenish fluorescence, and this centipede is rather bluish.
Nice photos.

mayko - 5-6-2013 at 13:18

When I was 6 or so, I went with my dad on a trip to the southwest; he was friends with a biology professor who was studying the fluorescence of scorpions. We would go out at night in the desert (Big Bend Nat'l Park) with handheld blacklights and look for the critters among the desert, which was strewn with fluorite, glowing all colors. There was no light pollution or humidity either, so the sky was clear and full of stars. I still have a jar of preserved specimens which fluoresces weakly. I'll see if I can dig it out and take a pic.

Had no idea about centipedes though, thanks for sharing!

kristofvagyok - 5-6-2013 at 14:47



How to know that your polyaromatic organic substance is in the etheral layer? Just use an UV lamp! :D

DrSchnufflez - 5-6-2013 at 14:50

Oh wow

Bezaleel - 6-6-2013 at 04:44

Quote: Originally posted by Squall181  
ZnS:Mn under UV light
(...)

Dit you make that or did you buy it? (I've read many attempts to make fluorescent/phosphorescent samples from ZnS, but most of them didn't work.)

Tdep - 6-6-2013 at 05:51

Quote: Originally posted by kristofvagyok  


Some nice crystals of my compound under UV right after recrystallization.

Have You seen my portfoio? It’s over here: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/tagged/portfolio


This has been my desktop background since you posted it.
Sir, you are an excellent man :)

IPN - 7-6-2013 at 07:30

TLC from a reaction I did few weeks ago (making some spiropyran derivative):





A bit blurry as it's in the chamber. Luckily the product could be precipitated out (faint orange spot above the big reddish one). :)

kristofvagyok - 11-6-2013 at 14:30

Making some shiny silver lumps from scrap:








elementcollector1 - 11-6-2013 at 14:49

I see a flux in the last one - what is it? Boric acid?

kristofvagyok - 11-6-2013 at 23:46

Quote: Originally posted by elementcollector1  
I see a flux in the last one - what is it? Boric acid?


It was borax, sodium-tetraborate.

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