Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Pretty Pictures (2)

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Tsjerk - 20-4-2018 at 14:10

Oops, I was confused and was thinking of salicylic acid, which could be made by hydrolysis of aspirin.

j_sum1 - 20-4-2018 at 21:36

Mixed chromium(III) waste in the bottom of a 1L beaker. It is deliquescent and has taken on a really glossy sheen.

2018-04-21 09.42.43.jpg - 1MB

HeYBrO - 21-4-2018 at 01:31

Quote: Originally posted by Hegi  
Quote: Originally posted by Tsjerk  
Not exactly salen, but close enough and with very OTC chemicals!

http://www.asianjournalofchemistry.co.in/User/ViewFreeArticl...


I see yes, thiourea is cheap but what about salicylaldehyde, where can I get it? Any idea?


Aspirin-->salicylic acid-->phenol

With phenol you can perform a Reimer-Tiemann reaction to get salicaldehyde. But I must admit, I don't know if anyone has actually done it on SM. But all the reagents are OTC or can be made from OTC reagents.

Flagmat - 26-4-2018 at 05:12

Milk and soap


Formates crystals

Supersonic - 28-4-2018 at 11:27

Quote: Originally posted by Hegi  
Quote: Originally posted by Supersonic  
Quote: Originally posted by Amos  
Copper(II) formate crystals. Their supernatant is the deepest of royal blues and yet the crystals are an icy-looking aqua color.


Large crystals have a nice form and beautiful color.
It`s a pity that they erodes even in warm air.

There crystals were synthesed from copper(II) hydroxide and formic acid.





Those are really beuatiful copper formate crystals. Especially, the second one is really big and it seems to be nicely shaped. What technique did you use to grow it? I tried once but there was a problem with hydrolysis mostly and even in acidic environment the salt did not want to crystallize easily. :)


These crystals were grown with slow evaporation method during about 2-2.5 months. I`ve just put acidic solution into the plastic glassful and voila :)

It`s a pity that crystals slowly erodes in open air. I tried to save it in packet with zip lock, but after few months it was fully eroded and crumbled.


I also tried some other formates. For example, crystals of calcium formate:

IMG_20160805_201833.jpg - 2.7MB

Texium (zts16) - 7-5-2018 at 11:02

Crystals of sulfanilic acid that I prepared recently:

Sulfanilic_acid.JPG - 1.7MB

The light purple coloration is not inherent to the compound, but due to traces of polyanilines.

weilawei - 8-5-2018 at 10:03

Distillation of bromine from NaBr, TCCA, and HCl.

20180429_191725.jpg - 1.8MB

The Volatile Chemist - 10-5-2018 at 13:05

A very pretty picture, looks like fun. I appreciate the nice combination of a good nature and chemistry photo.

Boffis - 17-5-2018 at 07:50

@ Supersonic, have you tried strontium formate? I believe the crystals are the dihydrate but they grow into large well formed blocky prisms. I can remember growing them years ago.

Supersonic - 19-5-2018 at 01:53

@Boffis

Yes, I've grown few crystals of strontium formate. They have beautiful prismatic shape:
IMG_20170122_183421.jpg - 1.3MB IMG_20180311_194623.jpg - 787kB
But it is hard to grow large monocrystal because of low solubility.

For me, it is more pleasant to grow strontium acetate, which mainly forms monocrystals and have arrow-like shape:
IMG_20170207_143625.jpg - 1.7MB

j_sum1 - 19-5-2018 at 02:48

I could do strontium acetate. I might have to try that.

CaCl2 - 21-5-2018 at 09:03



Some cesium copper chloride crystals

I first found out about cesium tetrachlorocuprate from this site when I was looking for a yellow compound for my collection of copper compounds (posted earlier in this thread), at the time I didn't consider it as a candidate for crystallization.

Later, when I was looking for a new, interesting materials to grow crystals from, I decided to check if it would crystallize, and found a paper which said it would form yellow-orange crystals.

The compound doesn't contain water of crystallization, and seems to be air stable. It is also a very unusual color for a copper compound; dichromate-like orange.
My first attempt produced nice, orange crystals, but later attempts also resulted in darker, brownish crystals of unknown composition forming. These crystals turned more reddish and lost their transparency completely over time.

crystal grower - 23-5-2018 at 08:51

pH paper I got after filtering anthocyanins extract from roses. I just let it dry out and cut into stripes.
It's strong acid on the top then weak acid, weak base, strong base and the bottom is neutral.

IMG_20180523_174216.jpg - 2.1MB

crystal grower - 23-5-2018 at 09:28

Resublimed iodine crystals.

jod.jpg - 423kB

stamasd - 18-6-2018 at 03:59

Quote: Originally posted by crystal grower  
First crystal of my CoSO4 solution prepared from CoCl2 + Na2CO3, then CoCO3 + H2SO4.
I'll try to make prettier crystals when the solution is all evaporated.


Cobalt salts make some very aesthetically pleasing crystals. I've got a mess of similar crystals inside a vial of Co(NO3)2 saturated solution due to partial evaporation.

stamasd - 22-6-2018 at 03:20

Quote: Originally posted by The Plutonium Bunny  
Recently, I've been really interested in crystals of pure metals, mostly for my element collection. After being inspired by The Backyard Scientist's video (see his post on page 23 of this thread), I decided to grow some of my own copper crystals. Over a period of six weeks, I used a 40g/L solution of copper sulfate and two copper electrodes with a current of always less than 10mA to grow some truly amazing copper crystal clusters. Unlike nearly all the other experiments I saw online, these crystals are very large and sharply defined - they are not nodules or rounded growths. I think that the extremely low current and the very long growth time contributes to the crystalline nature of this growth.

I made a YouTube video about how I grew this, and I also included a 360° rotation to show the entire crystal. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZniOJ7swic

Also, for those who might like to repeat this experiment (the crystal is truly stunning), I wrote an extensive post on my website with details on the experiment. http://sciencewithscreens.blogspot.com/2016/06/experiment-53-growing-large-copper.html This post also has a link to my experimental data and observations I recorded during the six-week period.

Finally, I also included the less-impressive picture of my first attempt. This used currents of around 20mA over two weeks, and I accidentally broke the crystal. It's still pretty neat, though.

In the future, I will be trying other metals. Does anyone have experience with growing crystals of other metals? Thank you!


I like those crystals so much that I decided to make some of my own. And on the cheap. I repurposed a plastic take-out food container (that originally had chicken tikka masala in it, thoroughly cleaned) and filled it almost to the top with CuSO4 80g/l (40g in 500ml solution, with dH2O) and a pinch of sea salt. Electrodes made from 14 gauge copper wire (1.6mm) about 1m of it for the anode, short length for cathode. For the constant current source I decided to go as simple as possible: a 5V wallwart, and a JFET+resistor. Essentially this (not my drawing):



Randomly chosen JFET from a big pile of them, measured IDSS=22mA; used a 150ohm resistor which resulted in 9.6mA constant current, perfect.

Will check again on it in a month or so.

wg48 - 22-6-2018 at 23:42

Stamasd:

I thought constant current would tended to favour dendritic growth as the high points closer to the counter electrode hog the limited current and hence grow faster. In addition its probably a function of the resistance of the solution (its concentration) and the distance to the counter electrode relative to the height of crystal growth.

stamasd - 23-6-2018 at 03:02

We shall see. The author of the post I quoted (from 2 years ago) has had nice results with a similar setup. The electrolyte is quite concentrated and has a low resistance (on the order of 0.5ohms) and the distance between anode and cathode is fairly large compared to the exposed surface of the cathode (8cm vs 0.5cm) so I hope that the variations in current density at the cathode will be minor enough to not make a difference.

Again we shall see. It's an experiment; if it doesn't work I will try to change its conditions for the next time until it does. :)

Edit: here's what the cathode looks like after 2 days.

[Edited on 23-6-2018 by stamasd]

20180623_144104.jpg - 2MB

mayko - 6-7-2018 at 17:53






Uranium concentrates from various mines (mostly on and about the Colorado Plateau)

(ed: ?? has tweet embedding turned off ??)

[Edited on 7-7-2018 by mayko]

Abromination - 20-7-2018 at 19:41

Boiling water off of copper (ii) acetate

IMG_3020.JPG - 1.3MB

ThatBenzeneRing - 15-8-2018 at 22:42

My small copper collection. Belonging to me, ABROMINATION and not my backup account that im stuck with.

IMG_3173.JPG - 1.5MB

EDIT: of course I forgot to name them. From left to right:
Tetraamminediaquacopper dihydroxide, copper acetylsalysilate, copper acetate, copper borate, copper carbonate, copper sulfate and copper metal.

[Edited on 16-8-2018 by ThatBenzeneRing]

[Edited on 16-8-2018 by ThatBenzeneRing]

The Volatile Chemist - 22-8-2018 at 18:05

Abromination, that's a nice little collection going there. I like the vials you're using there - not quite 'chemistry lab spec' but I think they give the collection a nice look - good photo.

Snails love ether

DrScrabs - 24-8-2018 at 08:24

Its a bit rainy today so I went under the balcony and It seems that snails love ether. Two more were on the pot and two more on the way


Snail ether 1.jpg - 2.1MB

fusso - 24-8-2018 at 09:09

Quote: Originally posted by DrScrabs  
Its a bit rainy today so I went under the balcony and It seems that snails love ether. Two more were on the pot and two more on the way
How come the snail don't have a shell?!

DrScrabs - 24-8-2018 at 09:37

Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Quote: Originally posted by DrScrabs  
Its a bit rainy today so I went under the balcony and It seems that snails love ether. Two more were on the pot and two more on the way
How come the snail don't have a shell?!

I´m sorry I used the wrong word, acually in english it´s called a slug or directly from german "nacked snail" :)
I do not know if you can find them on every continent but if you dont know how it feels to step barefoot on them, you didn´t miss anything in your life ;)
Edit 1 I´ve added another pic so you can see where the beasts were coming from, guess the wind direction
Edit 2 Just went looking and added the secon snug pic...no more words...
Ether setup.jpg - 3.9MB



[Edited on 24-8-2018 by DrScrabs]

snug ehter 2.jpg - 2.3MB

Sulaiman - 24-8-2018 at 10:19

Slugs and snails were abundant in the garden when we moved in to this house.
the best way to get rid of them is to collect them during wet dark hours,
but beer traps work.
A half-full container of beer attracts slugs in, and they drown ...
after a few days the trap stops working and needs fresh beer,
which is why I stopped using this method,
as I'm not allowed alcohol myself, I'm definitely not treating my enemy to two free beers a week.

DraconicAcid - 24-8-2018 at 10:40

Why not? That way they'll be damned as well as dead.

Abromination - 25-8-2018 at 14:00

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Abromination, that's a nice little collection going there. I like the vials you're using there - not quite 'chemistry lab spec' but I think they give the collection a nice look - good photo.


Thanks! I got them from a special store called "The Natural Pantry." It has a DIY section for making plant salves and stuff. I saw these vials for making lip balm and thought they would be perfect for vials. They are quite small (and not cheap) buy I got nine of them in a package and they are perfect for displaying chemicals. The bottle was also from Natural Pantry and the vial of copper was full of sand (which I dumped out) when I was on my schools symphonic band's trip in California.
I just made copper oxide and I also have copper tannate from tea, although there isnt enough to fill even a quarter vial.


IMG_3231.JPG - 1.3MBIMG_3232.JPG - 1.2MB

nimgoldman - 5-9-2018 at 07:42

UV fluorescence of beta-carbolines harmine and dihydroharmine (harmaline) extracted from P. harmala

DSC_0375.JPG - 177kB

The Volatile Chemist - 5-9-2018 at 18:47

That's crazy - Never heard of that. Was it done in a professional lab?

nimgoldman - 6-9-2018 at 04:20

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
That's crazy - Never heard of that. Was it done in a professional lab?


No the fluorescent harmala alkaloids, namely harmine and harmaline, have been extracted from Peganum harmala seeds. It's a simple A/B extraction followed by recrystallization from brine. It can be done at home lab.

I have also isolated harmaline and sythesized tetrahydroharmine hydrochloride based on this paper - tetrahydroharmine glows faintly blue under UV (see picture - I have used it as a eco friendly dye for body painting on a party :) ).

31841496_10215481028926419_8767127492180836352_o.jpg - 101kB

[Edited on 6-9-2018 by nimgoldman]

Donut reaction

Heptylene - 6-9-2018 at 15:47

I made some 4-amino-5-nitrosouracil recently, by nitrosation of 4-aminouracil with NaNO2/AcOH. The product precipitated and made a nice pink slurry that looked like a glazed donut :)

The preparation of the compound is given here (german), as an intermediate in the synthesis of caffeine. Btw the site is a great resource for amateur organic chemistry.

The reaction:
donut reaction.jpg - 223kB

A typical donut:
pink donut.jpg - 102kB

SWIM - 6-9-2018 at 18:37

Quote: Originally posted by nimgoldman  
Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
That's crazy - Never heard of that. Was it done in a professional lab?


No the fluorescent harmala alkaloids, namely harmine and harmaline, have been extracted from Peganum harmala seeds. It's a simple A/B extraction followed by recrystallization from brine. It can be done at home lab.

I have also isolated harmaline and sythesized tetrahydroharmine hydrochloride based on this paper - tetrahydroharmine glows faintly blue under UV (see picture - I have used it as a eco friendly dye for body painting on a party :) ).



[Edited on 6-9-2018 by nimgoldman]


Any central effects from all that skin contact?

If so, I hope they weren't serving Fava bean dip at that party.

Abromination - 13-9-2018 at 10:29

Thought this was kind of cool, its the solvent extraction of chlorophyll from willow bark.

IMG_3309.JPG - 1.2MB

Heptylene - 13-9-2018 at 14:21

Try to shine long wave UV light on that chlorophyll solution: you'll get a very nice red fluorescence. Speaking of fluorescence I tried some europium(III) oxide recently:

Europium oxide unver UV.JPG - 144kB

nimgoldman - 14-9-2018 at 07:43

Quote: Originally posted by SWIM  
Quote: Originally posted by nimgoldman  
Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
That's crazy - Never heard of that. Was it done in a professional lab?


No the fluorescent harmala alkaloids, namely harmine and harmaline, have been extracted from Peganum harmala seeds. It's a simple A/B extraction followed by recrystallization from brine. It can be done at home lab.

I have also isolated harmaline and sythesized tetrahydroharmine hydrochloride based on this paper - tetrahydroharmine glows faintly blue under UV (see picture - I have used it as a eco friendly dye for body painting on a party :) ).



[Edited on 6-9-2018 by nimgoldman]


Any central effects from all that skin contact?

If so, I hope they weren't serving Fava bean dip at that party.


Nope, it's not absorbed through the skin and even if it was, given the dilution factor the dose would be in the range of tens of micrograms, really not something to MAO enzymes (even the oral dose must be huge to fully inhibit MAO).

We just made few dots and lines here and there :)

Abromination - 15-9-2018 at 16:47

Quote: Originally posted by Heptylene  
Try to shine long wave UV light on that chlorophyll solution: you'll get a very nice red fluorescence.


I shined some UV light on it and it dimly flouresed red but it wasnt much. I don't think the light I was using was quite the right frequency though, it was only a few bucks.

My 'new' 14/23 thermometer

Sulaiman - 23-9-2018 at 02:18

Maybe not a particularly pretty picture to most, but it is to me
my old 10/19 (0 to 250 x 2oC) thermometer
next to my 'new' 14/23 (-10 to +350 x 1oC) thermometer


Thermometers.jpg - 675kB
(the readings are different due to environmental changes)

Thanks to DrScrabs
I can now get on with Hg and H2SO4 and kerosene distillations at atmospheric pressure.

(I previously needed a thermocouple in a thermometer pocket/well/adapter, which is OK,
but I like the look of 'real' thermometers,
even though more expensive and less useful)

I have not checked the calibration of the 14/23 thermometer yet.

Jackson - 23-9-2018 at 12:41

This is a picture of a sulfur containing mineral I found while walking on the beach. I was looking at the cliff and noticed a large vein of this brown rock with sulfur in it.

505FFFE9-9175-4533-84D4-90C433B3DBAE.jpeg - 1.6MB

MrHomeScientist - 24-9-2018 at 06:38

Quote: Originally posted by Abromination  
Quote: Originally posted by Heptylene  
Try to shine long wave UV light on that chlorophyll solution: you'll get a very nice red fluorescence.


I shined some UV light on it and it dimly flouresed red but it wasnt much. I don't think the light I was using was quite the right frequency though, it was only a few bucks.

If your solution was in a regular glass flask, the glass probably blocked most of the UV. Try shining it directly on the liquid, or using quartz glass (if you have any).

TheMrbunGee - 24-9-2018 at 07:57

Capture.PNG - 1.2MB


VIDEO!

weilawei - 25-9-2018 at 18:19

I needed more nitric acid to continue my experiments with plating, so I've got the still going. Noticed KNO2 and KNO3 precipitating out of the hose leading to my scrubber (traces of KOH solution in the hose used to load the scrubber).

20180925_220508_20180925221046262.jpg - 1.2MB

Jackson, that's a nice looking specimen there! Congrats on the find. Do you live in a volcanic area?

[Edited on 26-9-2018 by weilawei]

Jackson - 26-9-2018 at 07:58

Quote: Originally posted by weilawei  

Jackson, that's a nice looking specimen there! Congrats on the find. Do you live in a volcanic area?

[Edited on 26-9-2018 by weilawei]


The area is Geothermally active with hot springs.

MrHomeScientist - 3-10-2018 at 07:53

NH4NO3 1.jpg - 398kB NH4NO3 2.jpg - 296kB

Recrystallizing some ammonium nitrate from solution in tap water. I used this as a demonstration of temperature change, by "dissecting" cold packs, for students, and throwing it away seemed like a terrible waste. :D


I've been steadily boiling off the water and the solution gradually turns yellow for some reason. I also notice cubical crystals starting to grow on top of the nice long rods:

NH4NO3 3.jpg - 592kB

What are those? Does ammonium nitrate have several different crystal habits (is that even possible?)? I wouldn't think tap water has enough impurities to make so many large crystals.

Sigmatropic - 3-10-2018 at 20:59

Did you boil off the water in a metal pan? If so I believe the yellow color is from Fe3+. No idea what the cubical crystals are but can confirm it crystallizes as needles from a hot solution. Perhaps try to crystallize some by slow evaporation at RT, it might be a hydrate which only crystalizes belowa certain temperature (as with citric acid for example).

MrHomeScientist - 4-10-2018 at 05:49

No, it was all done in glass. It's possible there was iron in the tap water that's been concentrated; I started with something like 16 liters of solution, and am now down to about 3. All those pictures were crystals from cooling off of hot solution - I stopped boiling, filtered into a new container, let sit to cool, and the crystals grew. I could take a sample of the now-saturated solution to evaporate it and see what it does.

Jackson - 4-10-2018 at 17:24

Some sulfur i recrystalized from garden sulfur.

734D3AA1-2E71-43C3-90DC-17321A13E4A8.jpeg - 1.4MB

greenlight - 15-10-2018 at 10:15

Not really chemistry but still interesting to look at. Some still pics I found on an old device from when I started making larger aerial shells and was experimenting with the top-fusing method.
The quickmatch fuse lights the delay on the top of the shell in the first pic which in turn lights a second piece of quickmatch piped down the side of shell and ignites what would be the lift charge in the second photo.

[Edited on 15-10-2018 by greenlight]

Screenshot_2017-09-08-20-20-21.png - 2.1MBScreenshot_2017-09-08-20-20-30.png - 2.1MB

weilawei - 16-10-2018 at 18:24

A small amount of bromine in aqueous solution.

signal-2018-10-16-220202.jpg - 256kB

Gooferking Science - 21-10-2018 at 19:08

Freshly deposited iodine crystals.

Iodine.jpg - 4.6MB

VSEPR_VOID - 21-10-2018 at 19:13

Nice iodine, but if you really like halogens you would have posted bromine

Gooferking Science - 21-10-2018 at 19:24

Quote: Originally posted by VSEPR_VOID  
Nice iodine, but if you really like halogens you would have posted bromine


Here you go:

IMG_2223.JPG - 4.9MB

VSEPR_VOID - 21-10-2018 at 19:26

Quote: Originally posted by Gooferking Science  
Quote: Originally posted by VSEPR_VOID  
Nice iodine, but if you really like halogens you would have posted bromine


Here you go:


oi u cheekie wanker, do u got a licence fo that m8?

Chemist007 - 26-10-2018 at 13:18

Awesome...

Nickel Sulfate crystals

CarlSagans_RayGuns - 29-10-2018 at 08:39

These are some nickel sulfate crystals I made using Nimh batteries.

DSCF0643small.jpg - 728kB

Jackson - 4-11-2018 at 12:01

Copper sulfate that crystalized onto some nickels that i was trying to get nickel sulfate out of.

Also quick question: does nickel sulfate form co-crystals with copper sukfate?

image.jpg - 1.7MB

fusso - 4-11-2018 at 12:06

Quote: Originally posted by Jackson  
Copper sulfate that crystalized onto some nickels that i was trying to get nickel sulfate out of.

Also quick question: does nickel sulfate form co-crystals with copper sukfate?
Sad, you contaminated the crystals with dirt and oils on your hand...

Ubya - 4-11-2018 at 12:51

Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Quote: Originally posted by Jackson  
Copper sulfate that crystalized onto some nickels that i was trying to get nickel sulfate out of.

Also quick question: does nickel sulfate form co-crystals with copper sukfate?
Sad, you contaminated the crystals with dirt and oils on your hand...


i don't think that he's going to use them as seeds so i don't see the problem, and even if it was, a quick wash with acetone will remove any oils

Jackson - 4-11-2018 at 13:41

Should i cover them with a varnish if i want to use them as a display piece and preserve them? I assume i should but im not sure.

fusso - 4-11-2018 at 14:08

Quote: Originally posted by Jackson  
Should i cover them with a varnish if i want to use them as a display piece and preserve them? I assume i should but im not sure.
Maybe redissolve in water to remove the nickel (coin) and recrystallize to make new crystals?

MrHomeScientist - 5-11-2018 at 06:54

Quote: Originally posted by Jackson  
Should i cover them with a varnish if i want to use them as a display piece and preserve them? I assume i should but im not sure.

Yes, otherwise they start to lose water and get chalky. I used clear nail polish for mine.

Abromination - 5-12-2018 at 14:44

I mostly made this on accident trying to recover a partially decomposed compound.
The compound was iron (iii) salicylate which acts strange under acidic and basic conditions. It seems to me the reactions between it, acids and bases is in equilibrium because it is all reversible. First, I added acid to give it a clear, yellow appearance and then base to turn it back to its original purple color. I added slightly to much base, however and a green solution and brownish precipitate formed, as well as some purple. Nothing had been mixed, so it formed 3 layers of different colors and was absolutely beautiful.

IMG_5063.JPG - 1.2MB

The Volatile Chemist - 6-12-2018 at 07:57

Quote: Originally posted by Jackson  

Also quick question: does nickel sulfate form co-crystals with copper sukfate?


I've tried this before, from what I could tell - no. I've only ever seen one person report a two-transition metal sulfate co-crystal, but I've never been able to relocate that reference, so I'm dubious.

Abromination - 17-1-2019 at 18:18

Iodine I made for my element collection: My first halogen!
I'm going strong with my collection, I am working on synthesizing boron this weekend.

IMG_5363.JPG - 852kB

j_sum1 - 17-1-2019 at 19:18

Nice iodine, Abromination.

Before you do boron, make sure you ckeck out MrHomeScientist's videos on it. Both the old and the new. Old is good for procedure. New also mentions yield and purity issues (significant).

Abromination - 17-1-2019 at 22:03

Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
Nice iodine, Abromination.

Before you do boron, make sure you ckeck out MrHomeScientist's videos on it. Both the old and the new. Old is good for procedure. New also mentions yield and purity issues (significant).


I've seen the new ones, I am pretty much doing exactly what he did except in an iron crucible and am using larger amounts of the oxide.
I'm not entirely sure I have seen the old one, I will go check that out.

MrHomeScientist - 18-1-2019 at 12:27

:D Good luck! I'd love to see the results.

Abromination - 18-1-2019 at 16:03

Quote: Originally posted by MrHomeScientist  
:D Good luck! I'd love to see the results.

We shall see, my magnesium came in today.

Abromination - 21-1-2019 at 13:44

Quote: Originally posted by Abromination  
Quote: Originally posted by MrHomeScientist  
:D Good luck! I'd love to see the results.

We shall see, my magnesium came in today.


Ha, well I am going to need a coffee grinder for my boric oxide. Its just too hard for my mortar and pestle. How would you describe the smell of diborane? Is it almost ozone like?

[Edited on 1-21-19 by Abromination]

mayko - 25-1-2019 at 22:47



IMG_20180810_161010.jpg - 203kB

source:
https://twitter.com/elysetwilliams/status/102774533204456243...

RogueRose - 2-2-2019 at 18:37

I'm not sure how pretty this is, but it is interesting IMO. This is a saturated solution of iron acetate. It had about 2" of solid in the bottom and about 2" of liquid above it and it was allowed to sit out for about 2 months. About 2 weeks in I noticed a little "puff" on the lip of the bottle and it steadily grew. I'm guessing that as the water evaporated the crystals grew up the side of the bottle and wicked the other solution. It grew faster and faster, I'm guessing b/c there was more surface area for the solution to evaporate.

This puff ball was very light, probably weighing about 7-8 grams, which is very little considering the size.

On another note I've found something odd when making the acetate. I used vinegar and allowed nails to sit in a bottle exposed to the air. Rust/acetate would form above the surface on the nails sticking out of the vinegar and it would be brown/orange. If I added some H2O2 I would get a nice pink/purpleish solution like a mix of maganese sulfate and KMnO4. Can anyone explain why I would get this color temporiarily as I've never seen any iron compounds those colors except for some very odd oxides (specially made pigments).

iron acetate 1 sm.jpg - 178kB iron acetate 2.jpg - 283kB iron acetate 3.jpg - 193kB iron acetate 4.jpg - 228kB

crystal grower - 20-2-2019 at 11:53

Calcium oxalate crystals inside plant cells.

IMG_20190220_094127.jpg - 1.4MBIMG_20190220_094053.jpg - 1.2MBIMG_20190220_094255.jpg - 1MB

fusso - 20-2-2019 at 12:31

Quote: Originally posted by crystal grower  
Calcium oxalate crystals inside plant cells.
So that means plants also get "stones" right?

crystal grower - 22-2-2019 at 08:28

Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Quote: Originally posted by crystal grower  
Calcium oxalate crystals inside plant cells.
So that means plants also get "stones" right?

Well, yeah kind of. The primary reason for the formation of these crystals (also called raphides) is regulation of Ca2+ levels insinde plant tissues.
Some plants (e.g. Dieffenbachia) developed a secondary function and uses needle-like crystals of CaOx as a way to keep animals from eating them (they cause swelling when ingested).

[Edited on 22-2-2019 by crystal grower]

Pok - 3-3-2019 at 09:26

Liquid acetylene:

1.jpg - 604kB

How I made it: video.


j_sum1 - 3-3-2019 at 19:30

Lovely, Pok. Thanks for these.
(subscribed.)

[Edited on 4-3-2019 by j_sum1]

mayko - 17-3-2019 at 19:24

Quote: Originally posted by mayko  
Hot off the press, a never-before-published photograph of plutonium tetrafluoride! This was obtained by nuclear anthropologist Martin Pfeiffer via FOIA. It's a little disappointing (it is known as 'pink cake'; this is apparently misleading.) but upthread there are some very nice pictures of exotic things like plutonium trichloride
If you're on twitter and interested in nuclear history/technology/sociology, definitely check him out!



Martin has a new batch of pictures, probably the only of this plutonium compound in the public record.

PuF4.jpeg - 14kB


Announcement:
https://twitter.com/NuclearAnthro/status/1107414103499276288

More here, under My FOIA Responsive Documents/PuF4 Plutonium Tetrafluoride Pictures/
https://osf.io/46sfd/

Some chemical background:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/829rbeoruo3a78w/Preparation%20plut...


fusso - 17-3-2019 at 20:01

100%?! did they really manage to remove every atom of impurites?!:o

j_sum1 - 17-3-2019 at 20:42

Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
100%?! did they really manage to remove every atom of impurites?!:o
To three significant figures, why not?


Now if he had said, 100.00000000000%, I would be suspicious.

DraconicAcid - 17-3-2019 at 21:06

Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
100%?! did they really manage to remove every atom of impurites?!:o


No, they just rounded off to the nearest whole percentage.

Ubya - 21-3-2019 at 17:52

yesterday (a few hours ago) was my birthday, my best friend gave me this as a gift, Autunite sample, i've been looking for one one ebay for years, this made me so happy:D
(crappy photos taken with phone, i'll take better photos with a real camera in the morning, just came home after the party hahahhaa)
WhatsApp Image 2019-03-22 at 01.06.51.jpeg - 163kB WhatsApp Image 2019-03-22 at 01.05.44.jpeg - 59kB WhatsApp Image 2019-03-22 at 02.02.25.jpeg - 41kB

crystal grower - 21-3-2019 at 21:28

Wow, that's a beautiful sample, I'd love to len one, too :D.

Tsjerk - 22-3-2019 at 09:44

Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
100%?! did they really manage to remove every atom of impurites?!:o


It just means it is between 100.5% and 99.5%, obviously it can't be more than 100, so it is 99.5 or higher. Just like the other one which is between 93.5 and 94.5%.

Chem Science - 24-3-2019 at 13:11

Here's some Trifluoroacetic anhydride :D and bis(2,4,6 Tribromophenol) Oxalate :cool:

SAM_5660.JPG - 1.8MBSAM_5655.JPG - 1.8MB

greenlight - 26-3-2019 at 08:13

KMnO4 solution :o

[Edited on 26-3-2019 by greenlight]

Screenshot_20190326-172310_Gallery.jpg - 1.3MB

[Edited on 26-3-2019 by greenlight]

Tsjerk - 26-3-2019 at 13:51

HgCl2 after a broken mercury thermometer dissolved in an excess of HCl left for a month.

DSC_0015_1 (1).JPG - 1.6MB

MrHomeScientist - 27-3-2019 at 12:22

Yikes greenlight, you really should neutralize stuff like that instead of pouring straight down the drain! I know it probably wasn't much, since KMnO4's color is so intense, but in this case it's easy: just add sugar!

TheMrbunGee - 28-3-2019 at 10:40

Quote: Originally posted by MrHomeScientist  
Yikes greenlight, you really should neutralize stuff like that instead of pouring straight down the drain! I know it probably wasn't much, since KMnO4's color is so intense, but in this case it's easy: just add sugar!


It would decompose in minutes when mixing with dirty drain waters.

Ubya - 5-4-2019 at 16:54

some iodine in an evauated and sealed test tube (while cold it is transparent with solid iodine on the walls)

WhatsApp Image 2019-04-06 at 02.29.00.jpeg - 66kB

greenlight - 6-4-2019 at 10:04

Quote: Originally posted by MrHomeScientist  
Yikes greenlight, you really should neutralize stuff like that instead of pouring straight down the drain! I know it probably wasn't much, since KMnO4's color is so intense, but in this case it's easy: just add sugar!



Yeah I dont usually just pour stuff down the drain but it was a 0.02M solution and the colour is indeed intense even with very small amounts of solute.

Abromination - 7-4-2019 at 13:53

I found a picture from years ago from my first reaction ever, I must have had no clue what I was doing. I had seen a video showing copper sulfates reaction with bases and figured since baking soda was a base, it would react with the copper sulfate. I must have been about 12. Now that I think of it, the beautiful colors of copper compounds are really what got me interested in chemistry all of those years ago.

IMG_0876.PNG - 1.5MB

[Edited on 4-7-19 by Abromination]

Wizzard1 - 7-4-2019 at 17:45

By-product of Neodymium Sulfate purification. Enjoy!! It was about 3" across.

IMG_20190227_171556.jpg - 3.2MB

fusso - 7-4-2019 at 18:57

Quote: Originally posted by Wizzard1  
By-product of Neodymium Sulfate purification. Enjoy!! It was about 3" across.
So is it FeSO4 or Pr2(SO4)3?

j_sum1 - 7-4-2019 at 20:45

Sometimes the simple things are most satisfying.

2019-04-08 14.28.50 crop.jpg - 356kB

It is nice to be back in the lab.

MrHomeScientist - 8-4-2019 at 07:32

Beautiful, Wizzard1! I'm quite familiar with those from all my magnet work a while back. Mine never stayed nice for long.

It's FeSO4, fusso. You get tons of it from magnet processing. Pr is in such small quantities you'd need a hell of a lot of magnets to make that much, not to mention separating and purifying it from the Nd.

bipolar - 21-4-2019 at 05:32

Polycrystal of 5-MeO-DMT freebase :3

351.jpeg - 743kB

This beauty weighs about 380 mg :)

Made it from melatonin (1. hydrolysis; 2. reductive amination with formaldehyde / NaBH4).


[Edited on 21-4-2019 by bipolar]

Hegi - 24-4-2019 at 11:05

Quote: Originally posted by bipolar  
Polycrystal of 5-MeO-DMT freebase :3



This beauty weighs about 380 mg :)

Made it from melatonin (1. hydrolysis; 2. reductive amination with formaldehyde / NaBH4).


[Edited on 21-4-2019 by bipolar]


Amazing crystal and job. Can you please provide full procedure? I would love to get back to organic chemistry as I have access to NaBH4 now. :P

DraconicAcid - 7-5-2019 at 17:20

Some crystals of salicylic acid, grown from toluene/hexane. i was *trying* to make butyl salicylate, but I got these instead.

SalicAcid1.jpg - 83kB

DavidJR - 7-5-2019 at 17:55

Are you sure that's salicylic acid? When I recrystallised some of mine, I got needle-like crystals. Admittedly, I don't recall which solvent I used.

DraconicAcid - 7-5-2019 at 18:00

Quote: Originally posted by DavidJR  
Are you sure that's salicylic acid? When I recrystallised some of mine, I got needle-like crystals. Admittedly, I don't recall which solvent I used.


The melting point checked out (although I didn't do a mixed one). From water, I usually see needles.

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