Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Pretty Pictures (2)

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sparkgap - 6-6-2014 at 02:19

Quite nice! I hadn't realized that Mercurochrome's fluorescing color is different from its usual red. The green is quite different from that of plain Jane fluorescein, I suppose.

If it's not much trouble, do you have similar pictures using other triphenylmethane/phthalein pigments?

sparky (~_~)

arkoma - 6-6-2014 at 07:05



Pretty sure its Copper(I) Oxide Reference

kristofvagyok - 6-6-2014 at 07:28

Quote: Originally posted by sparkgap  

If it's not much trouble, do you have similar pictures using other triphenylmethane/phthalein pigments?

sparky (~_~)

Not really, we have circa 20kg phenolphthalein, but I never photographed it, maybe once(:

But here is a nice one:


I tried a trifluoromethyation with sodium trifluoroacetate in dimethylformamide on trinitrobenzene.

While heating the reaction mixture, the trifluoroacetate decomposed to give carbon dioxide, difluorocarbene and sodium fluoride. Since the sodium fluoride is an enough strong base in DMF to remove a proton from the trinitrobenzene, this red/orange thing formed what indicates the trinitrophenyl anion.

Brain&Force - 6-6-2014 at 15:20

Transit of Venus, 2012

<img src="http://i.imgur.com/lMNQGXQ.jpg" title="I wish I had a better camera." width=800>

sasan - 7-6-2014 at 06:13


how can I post my pix from my pc to here??
I have some flourscent solutions under UV light

The Volatile Chemist - 7-6-2014 at 09:47

Nice, B&F! What kind of set-up did you use to take it?

Brain&Force - 7-6-2014 at 11:58

A cell phone camera through some dude's refractor with a solar filter.

kristofvagyok - 7-6-2014 at 13:34



One of the most simple tests to show an organic compound present in a reaction mixture is irradiating the sample with UV light. If you know, that the product of the reaction should fluorescence blue, while the starting materials do not emit any light after irradiating the sample with UV, could help a lot while doing a reaction.

In this case a side product formed from the reaction above 130 °C, while the desired product formed at 100 °C. The starting material and the product did not emit any light under UV, while the side product did. So after taking the picture, I was sure, that the reaction is ready.

For more pics, visit: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/

Texium (zts16) - 9-6-2014 at 13:33

Just a nicely backlit picture some boiling copper sulfate solution, nothing too special, but I think it looks pretty cool.
IMG_1262.jpg - 1.3MB

alexleyenda - 9-6-2014 at 15:15

Quote: Originally posted by zts16  
I think it looks pretty cool.
yuup nice picture, copper sulfate's color always amazed me

Oscilllator - 9-6-2014 at 17:29

Anyone want to hazard a guess what this is?

clue: It isn't an organic compund

numos - 9-6-2014 at 17:48

Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
Anyone want to hazard a guess what this is?
clue: It isn't an organic compund


Just a wild guess, is it a copper sulfate, sodium dichloroisocyanurate complex? Otherwise no clue.
Although it's too light for that, I would like to make some,whatever it is, that color is... unseen.

U2U the name please? If you don't want to give it away here... :)

Fun with Copper!

Amos - 9-6-2014 at 17:48



IMG_0487.JPG - 2.1MB

Copper oxychloride (Dicopper chloride trihydroxide), freshly precipitated from a copper (II) chloride solution.

IMG_0486.JPG - 3.4MB

A vial in which I was conducting Fehlig's test for reducing sugars. The top layer is partially hydrolyzed starch, the middle is Fehlig's solution, and the bottom shows some hydrated copper (I) oxide precipitating, indicating glucose in the starch.

IMG_0494.JPG - 3.3MB

I don't find this as pretty as I do just neat, but these are some US nickels freshly plated in copper from a hot copper (II) acetate solution.

Amos - 9-6-2014 at 17:50

Oscillator, I recently precipitated an unknown copper(surprising, right?) compound that looked just like that by accident, waxy texture and everything. I am very interested in finding out what it is. Upon long exposure to air at ambient temperature that same sample turned blue-green, and returns to the violet color with heating.

[Edited on 6-10-2014 by No Tears Only Dreams Now]

numos - 9-6-2014 at 17:57

Quote: Originally posted by No Tears Only Dreams Now  
Oscillator, I recently precipitated an unknown copper(surprising, right?) compound that looked just like that by accident, waxy texture and everything. I am very interested in finding out what it is.[Edited on 6-10-2014 by No Tears Only Dreams Now]


What did you precipitate it from? I collect copper salts, and I have never seen this...

Amos - 9-6-2014 at 18:06

Quote: Originally posted by numos  


What did you precipitate it from? I collect copper salts, and I have never seen this...


I was going for precipitating cuprous oxide for my collection by reducing copper sulfate by the method in the second half of this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIHZ_zFu9lA

Long story short, it requires citric acid; I was impatient and tried to use kool-aid powder (cheap american drink mix) :D

It requires heating to complete the reaction; however, this curious precipitate formed almost immediately. And what is even more strange is that I can light it with a lighter, and it will weakly smolder for a bit.

Gooferking Science - 9-6-2014 at 19:01

An interesting blob of MEKP prior to detonation

IMG_3980.JPG - 696kB

Oscilllator - 9-6-2014 at 23:00

Hmmm, people seem to be jumping to the conclusion that this is a copper compound. Understandable, but nonetheless incorrect.
Keep guessing!

Tsjerk - 10-6-2014 at 03:32

Anhydrous cobalt chloride?

Amos - 10-6-2014 at 05:47

Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
Hmmm, people seem to be jumping to the conclusion that this is a copper compound. Understandable, but nonetheless incorrect.
Keep guessing!


I think rather we are hoping it is, so that we can add it to our collections(which, apparently, I'm not the only person obsessed with copper compounds). Can you tell us if it is wet or dry in the picture?

DraconicAcid - 10-6-2014 at 08:04

Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
Anyone want to hazard a guess what this is?
clue: It isn't an organic compund


It looks the right colour for hexamminenickel(II) chloride.

Texium (zts16) - 10-6-2014 at 10:16

Quote: Originally posted by No Tears Only Dreams Now  
Can you tell us if it is wet or dry in the picture?

Indeed, that would be quite helpful.
I don't really have any idea what it really is, but I would guess wet cobalt carbonate.
Edit: Or possibly cobalt phosphate.

[Edited on 6-10-2014 by zts16]

Brain&Force - 10-6-2014 at 14:01

Iodine spill! Did this for a bunch of curious biology students.

<a href="http://imgur.com/DU8fKVG"><img src="http://i.imgur.com/DU8fKVG.jpg" title="Mmm...swimming pool." width=800 /></a>

[Edited on 10.6.2014 by Brain&Force]

The Volatile Chemist - 10-6-2014 at 14:06

Cool image, BUT IT'S SIZE! I just can't get over it's size... :P

Brain&Force - 10-6-2014 at 14:33

I had to keep turning the fume hood on and off in order to flush the fumes. I was attempting to get rid of some residual iodine coating on the vial.

Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
Anyone want to hazard a guess what this is?
clue: It isn't an organic compund


It looks the right colour for hexamminenickel(II) chloride.


I thought [Ni(NH3)6]Cl2 is pink. I tried making some today, but I never got past the blue tetraammine complex.

http://www.theodoregray.com/periodictable/Samples/NiCl2/inde...

[Edited on 10.6.2014 by Brain&Force]

Metacelsus - 10-6-2014 at 14:37

@ B&F : tragic waste of iodine! :mad:

Texium (zts16) - 10-6-2014 at 14:40

Quote: Originally posted by Cheddite Cheese  
@ B&F : tragic waste of iodine! :mad:


I know! I was just thinking that too…
All the beautiful things it could have done, but it just had to go flying out a fume hood...

bismuthate - 10-6-2014 at 14:43

:(*stares mournfully at vapors:(*
But what did biologist want with I2? (I'm not exacly a biologist so this may be stupid)

Brain&Force - 10-6-2014 at 14:48

I was cleaning out a fume hood during a biology class that wasn't doing anything, so I decided to entertain the students. It was worth it, because ALL of them got very excited. They weren't using the iodine for anything.

At the same time the iodine was being used to grow crystals inside the vial. Couldn't get any good pictures though.

And for those of you worried about the travesty I committed, there was only about .2 grams of iodine in the vial.

Texium (zts16) - 10-6-2014 at 15:00

Ok then, I guess it just looks like a lot more than it actually is. That's understandable.

Metacelsus - 10-6-2014 at 17:59

.2 grams of iodine is still more than I have (50 mg).

Oscilllator - 10-6-2014 at 18:01

Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  

It looks the right colour for hexamminenickel(II) chloride.

Correct! (or close enough as makes no difference). It is Hexaamine nickel nitrate, shown here before drying:

I prepared it by first drying the nickel nitrate as much as possible by azeotropic removal of water using toluene. The picture below is of the Nickel nitrate after drying. I presume it is the dihydrate, but it could be the trihydrate or even higher, I don't know. A lot of water was removed from the nickel nitrate though, so I suspect its a fairly low hydrate.

I then removed the toluene, dissolved the nickel nitrate in ethanol and bubbled ammonia gas through the mixture, creating a beautiful precipitate of the hexaamine complex. The precipitate was so fine some of it got through the filter, and I was unable to fully dry the sample. It is still wet with ethanol, since I can see no way to dry it without removing the ammonia ligands

@Brain&Force I very much doubt the complex you linked is nickel Hexaamine chloride. The hexaamine complexes are unstable in air (I sealed mine in a plastic vial glued shut) because the ammonia ligands get gradually replaced by water ones. The compound looks a lot more like cobalt chloride to me, but of course I could be wrong.

Amos - 10-6-2014 at 18:28

Oscillator, every step of the whole synthesis looks amazing! Maybe I'll collect Nickel compounds next...

[Edited on 6-11-2014 by No Tears Only Dreams Now]

Texium (zts16) - 10-6-2014 at 18:35

Be careful, most are beautiful yet also very carcinogenic! Personally, I don't like keeping them around, as nice looking as they are.

Oscilllator - 10-6-2014 at 18:59

Quote: Originally posted by No Tears Only Dreams Now  
Oscillator, every step of the whole synthesis looks amazing! Maybe I'll collect Nickel compounds next...

[Edited on 6-11-2014 by No Tears Only Dreams Now]


Hmmm yes, I was actually thinking of doing a prepublication article on the whole process of nickel metal -> Nickel chloride -> nickel carbonate -> nickel nitrate -> dehydration -> nickel hexaamine nitrate, since the whole process is rather fun, and the pictures are quite nice.
The only thing left to do is make nickel hydrazine nitrate, but so far my efforts have failed. The problem there is I can't figure out how to safely isolate hydrazine from my meagre supple of hydrazine sulfate.

DraconicAcid - 10-6-2014 at 19:02

Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
@Brain&Force I very much doubt the complex you linked is nickel Hexaamine chloride. The hexaamine complexes are unstable in air (I sealed mine in a plastic vial glued shut) because the ammonia ligands get gradually replaced by water ones. The compound looks a lot more like cobalt chloride to me, but of course I could be wrong.


What usually happens is that the ammonia simply evaporates; whether water replaces it or not depends on the humidity of the air.

The colour doesn't look right for the hexammine complex- it should be more purplish-blue than pink. I agree- it does look more like cobalt chloride hexahydrate.

MrHomeScientist - 10-6-2014 at 19:25

Here's my preparation of hexaaminenickel(II) chloride - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49z5-Adw9QA

Mine was definitely purple:

Capture.PNG - 286kB

My experience too is that you can't really dry it completely - if you leave it out in air the ammonia ligands escape and it returns to regular old green nickel(II) chloride (as seen in the video).


--------------------------------

And for my own Pretty Picture, the underside of a small "raft" of potassium sulfate crystals that formed on the surface of a saturated solution that I'm recrystallizing from. The little pyramids formed stalactites floating on solution!
K2SO4 crystals.jpg - 156kB

[Edited on 6-11-2014 by MrHomeScientist]

Texium (zts16) - 10-6-2014 at 19:46

Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  

@Brain&Force I very much doubt the complex you linked is nickel Hexaamine chloride. The hexaamine complexes are unstable in air (I sealed mine in a plastic vial glued shut) because the ammonia ligands get gradually replaced by water ones. The compound looks a lot more like cobalt chloride to me, but of course I could be wrong.



I think it actually looks a lot more like anhydrous chromium(III) chloride rather than cobalt chloride. It has that same lustrous dark violet color, whereas cobalt chloride is more reddish purple.
Here's a picture of some for reference:


[Edited on 6-11-2014 by zts16]

Brain&Force - 10-6-2014 at 19:58

MrHomeScientist: It's no longer necessary to resize photos if that's what you're doing. I personally use imgur.

It may be tris(ethylenediamine)nickel(II) chloride. Photo from woelen.


Cobalt chloride

Tsjerk - 11-6-2014 at 05:43

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Anhydrous_Cobalt%28II...

I guessed Cobalt (II) Chloride based on this picture.

In biology by the way we use Iodine to colour starch. Bacillus transformations are often done with a DNA construct that after transfection gets inserted in the locus for amylase by homologous recombination.

If you then grow your Bacillus on a plate with starch you can check whether your recombination was successful by using iodine. You will get a colourless halo around the colony when it failed.

[Edited on 11-6-2014 by Tsjerk]

MrHomeScientist - 11-6-2014 at 07:02

B&F: Well, I like attaching photos to the posts instead of using a website link because external sources can change or disappear over the years. There's been several old threads I've read that used to be full of interesting goodies, but the photo and document links have since been broken. My hope is that resizing and attaching is a more permanent solution.

Brain&Force - 11-6-2014 at 07:10

I hadn't thought of that. But the attachment size limit is now larger thanks to Polverone; you no longer have to resize the images.

Zephyr - 11-6-2014 at 19:40

Quote: Originally posted by zts16  
Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  

@Brain&Force I very much doubt the complex you linked is nickel Hexaamine chloride. The hexaamine complexes are unstable in air (I sealed mine in a plastic vial glued shut) because the ammonia ligands get gradually replaced by water ones. The compound looks a lot more like cobalt chloride to me, but of course I could be wrong.



I think it actually looks a lot more like anhydrous chromium(III) chloride rather than cobalt chloride. It has that same lustrous dark violet color, whereas cobalt chloride is more reddish purple.
Here's a picture of some for reference:


[Edited on 6-11-2014 by zts16]

Anhydrous cobalt chloride is a light blue, and is only red in its hydrate form. Here are some pictures from a recent synthesis.




[Edited on 6-12-2014 by Pinkhippo11]

Brain&Force - 13-6-2014 at 13:19

Some potassium terbium sulfate under UV light. It's also noticeably paramagnetic. (I wonder what its Curie temperature is...)

<a href="http://imgur.com/tyB4mb7"><img src="http://i.imgur.com/tyB4mb7.jpg" title="Should I drop my remaining 2 grams of terbium metal into a test tube of molten potassium chlorate?" width=800 /></a>

In case you didn't know, I alt-text all of my photos.


The Volatile Chemist - 13-6-2014 at 19:03

I dunno B&F, what happens when you do that...? :) (Innocent smile....)

Texium (zts16) - 14-6-2014 at 10:48

Here's a test tube containing copper(II)bromide complex at different concentrations, prepared from sodium bromide and copper(II)sulfate. I prepared two solutions, one concentrated and one diluted, and then combined them in this tube. I love the way it changes colors so dramatically depending on concentration. After swirling the tube a bit, it became a uniform yellow color.

IMG_1264.jpg - 486kB

Zyklon-A - 14-6-2014 at 11:30

Iron trichloride hydrate. It's amazingly dark, will stain anything. Also quite dense.



[Edited on 14-6-2014 by Zyklonb]

image_jpg-thumb1.0.jpg - 23kB

Texium (zts16) - 14-6-2014 at 11:41

I have come to dislike iron(III)chloride, because of all of all the time I spent tediously (and in the end, unsuccessfully) trying to separate it from manganese chloride that I had obtained form the oxides in batteries.
You're right about it staining anything. The white plastic funnel I was using during filtering is now beige on the inside.

[Edited on 6-14-2014 by zts16]

Zyklon-A - 14-6-2014 at 11:48

Yeah, it's very messy to work with.
I made it from pure iron, hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

It's reaction with a sodium carbonate solution is pretty cool looking if you add the iron chloride solution drop by drop to the carbonate solution.



[Edited on 14-6-2014 by Zyklonb]

image_jpg-thumb2.0.jpg - 16kB

Brain&Force - 14-6-2014 at 15:14

I really don't like working with any iron compounds, they're all the cause of my problems. Do you know what molarity your solution is, Zyklonb?

On another note, can someone fix the image size? I'm having issues with this thread.

Texium (zts16) - 14-6-2014 at 15:26

@B&F: I don't usually either for the same reason, but I might try crystalizing some for my crystal collection I'm working on.

Edit: Oh, and now that I've posted this, it's started a new page, fixing the image size problem you mentioned, at least for the current page!

[Edited on 6-14-2014 by zts16]

Brain&Force - 14-6-2014 at 15:31

Not my work, but here's a video of erbium-praseodymium powder spontaneously igniting in air:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i45S_YW2Hg

No ignition sources needed.

kristofvagyok - 14-6-2014 at 16:37






3,4-O-Isopropylidene-D-mannitol, purity over 99% according to NMR analysis.

numos - 14-6-2014 at 21:43

On the subject of needle crystals:

Recrystallized Salicylic acid:
WP_20140614_002.jpg - 342kB


Sublimation distillation of Phthalic acid to Phthalic anhydride
WP_20140613_007.jpg - 275kB

Nowhere as impressive as kristof's crystals, but still pleasant to look at.



sasan - 15-6-2014 at 03:05


pyranine solution in water under UV light:cool:

DSC_0046.jpg - 438kB

Brain&Force - 15-6-2014 at 11:14

Try adding some acid and base for some interesting effects - pyranine is a fluorescent pH indicator.

sasan - 16-6-2014 at 06:19


Violet hexamine nickel (II) chloride and Yellow dipotassium tetra chloro nickelate(II)

are they cool enough??:D

DSC_0245.jpg - 424kBDSC_0249.jpg - 307kB

Metacelsus - 16-6-2014 at 07:02

What's the blue stuff on the far right?

The Volatile Chemist - 16-6-2014 at 07:11

Very nice pictures everyone!
I like the yellow complex :)

sasan - 16-6-2014 at 07:30

It is hexamine nickel chloride too but it is under sunlight ,the left is under tungsten light0

The Volatile Chemist - 16-6-2014 at 07:40

^Oh my, that's a stunning difference!

sasan - 17-6-2014 at 06:53

6gr platinium metal :cool::cool:

Platinium.jpg - 979kB

The Volatile Chemist - 17-6-2014 at 07:20

Where'd you pick up that?

DraconicAcid - 17-6-2014 at 08:23

The yellow tetrachloronickel(II) complex is particularly surprising. I've made the tetraethylammonium salt of that ion, and it's blue.

sasan - 17-6-2014 at 10:17


In fact in solution was green,apon drying was green too,but after heating to about 45 c,the color change to deep yellowish orane,after puverizing change to light yellow with some green tint
In wiki the tetrachloronicklate ion is yellow

DraconicAcid - 17-6-2014 at 11:03

Quote: Originally posted by sasan  

In fact in solution was green,apon drying was green too,but after heating to about 45 c,the color change to deep yellowish orane,after puverizing change to light yellow with some green tint
In wiki the tetrachloronicklate ion is yellow

How did you make it?

sasan - 17-6-2014 at 21:37


I've prepared it months ago,but as I realize,first I dissolved NiCl2.6H2O in water(preferly concentrated) added drops of con HCl(aq)into sulotion and added 2moles KCl for each moles of NiCl2.apaporated and heated to about 40 c or place it under of intense hot sunlight.this is the procedure but I'm not sure if it will work or not.try it in stochiometric amounts

sasan - 18-6-2014 at 02:47

Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
The yellow tetrachloronickel(II) complex is particularly surprising. I've made the tetraethylammonium salt of that ion, and it's blue.


how did you make the tetraethylammonium salt??can you write the complete name and structure of this salt?it seems to nedd tetrammonium chloride reagent(I don't have:()

[Edited on 18-6-2014 by sasan]

DraconicAcid - 18-6-2014 at 09:06

Quote: Originally posted by sasan  
Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
The yellow tetrachloronickel(II) complex is particularly surprising. I've made the tetraethylammonium salt of that ion, and it's blue.


how did you make the tetraethylammonium salt??can you write the complete name and structure of this salt?it seems to nedd tetrammonium chloride reagent(I don't have)


Dissolve nickel chloride hexahydrate in absolute ethanol with triethyl formate, heat until the solution is brown. Then add a solution of tetraethylammonium chloride in ethanol to get blue (NEt4)2[NiCl4].

violet sin - 19-6-2014 at 09:24

couple pics to post here,

antimony 95g
antimony resized.JPG - 288kB
cadmium stick 1/2 lb
cadmium stick resized.JPG - 227kB

tellurium pics, 1) 2lb ingot, 2) chunks broken from ingot, 3) ingot remainder, and 4) end of bar showing crystalline structure
resized Te bar.JPG - 263kB big chunks resized.JPG - 135kB

half stick resized.JPG - 99kB Te fist resized.JPG - 115kB

the gentleman who sold the Te has more of the 2# ingots for an affordable price if any one is interested. I'm going to get more. 120$/2 lb with shipping to the US only. I will post in reagent acquisition shortly. in the ebay auction it said, 97%, but in personal email it was stated 99.7%, which I believe after breaking this thing up a little. so stoked to find it at a good price :D

numos - 19-6-2014 at 13:29

Some Sulfur dichloride I prepared yesterday. The ampule on the right is very contaminated with disulfur dichloride, but the other three are quite pure.

WP_20140619_006.jpg - 280kB

Oscilllator - 19-6-2014 at 18:34

Numos wouldn't it be unsafe to store disulfur dichloride for long periods of time? I thought that it decomposed to disulfur dichloride and chlorine gas, building up pressure until the vessel explodes. Or is an equilibrium formed at a low enough pressure to be safe?

HgDinis25 - 20-6-2014 at 04:12

Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
Numos wouldn't it be unsafe to store disulfur dichloride for long periods of time? I thought that it decomposed to disulfur dichloride and chlorine gas, building up pressure until the vessel explodes. Or is an equilibrium formed at a low enough pressure to be safe?


Actualy, he's storing Sulfur Dichloride, not Disulfur Dichloride. Sulfur Dichloride looses chlorine over time. However, in an ampoule, there will be a slight higher pressure than 1atm, because of chlorine formation. However, like you said, the equilibrium is quickly reached and no pressure build up actualy happens. The decomposition of Sulfur Dichloride may be reduced by placing it in an ampoule that had been previously filled with chlorine gas.

numos - 20-6-2014 at 06:07

Quote: Originally posted by HgDinis25  
Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
Numos wouldn't it be unsafe to store disulfur dichloride for long periods of time? I thought that it decomposed to disulfur dichloride and chlorine gas, building up pressure until the vessel explodes. Or is an equilibrium formed at a low enough pressure to be safe?


Actualy, he's storing Sulfur Dichloride, not Disulfur Dichloride. Sulfur Dichloride looses chlorine over time. However, in an ampoule, there will be a slight higher pressure than 1atm, because of chlorine formation. However, like you said, the equilibrium is quickly reached and no pressure build up actualy happens. The decomposition of Sulfur Dichloride may be reduced by placing it in an ampoule that had been previously filled with chlorine gas.


Yes, this is correct. The best way to store Sulfur dichloride is in an ample as it keeps the substance from decomposing. I think I'm going to make a video on the preparation of this, it is pretty simple, but can be very messy and lethal if done incorrectly.

arkoma - 20-6-2014 at 09:48



Beaut-i-mous to me. Rose leaves refluxing in acetone. The maid cleaned AROUND it. (Living in a motel ATM) Nevada puts up with anything if yer not on dope or stealing LOL

HgDinis25 - 20-6-2014 at 11:40

Crossing the road can also be messy and lethal if done incorrectly. And you won't film a video of how to cross the road (I thing). You should want to make the video because of the amazing chemistry going on, and all the complex thinking that designed the experiment ;)

Mailinmypocket - 21-6-2014 at 19:30

Received some hard to get chrysene. Here is 5mg in 3ml acetone under a blacklight. A neat and different fluorescent material! It is found in car exhaust, cigarette smoke and burnt BBQ foods I believe.
Quite carcinogenic and expensive. A small speck is seen in the bottom of the vial


[Edited on 22-6-2014 by Mailinmypocket]

violet sin - 21-6-2014 at 21:21


KCl crystal I grew over the course of the last year and a half. ran out of room in the snapple tea bottle, destroyed the bottle to retrieve it. just mixed and set out for a long time, then put in with worn out CaCl2 and checked periodically. turned out nice I think
IMAG0322.jpg - 824kB IMAG0305.jpg - 823kB IMAG0301.jpg - 809kB



pile of ammonium sulfate,... drying magnesium hydroxide,... some of the larger crystals of ammonium sulfate. I had made the magnesium hydroxide for a ceramic component. epsom salt and ammonia, MgSO4 + 2 NH4OH -> Mg(OH)2 + (NH4)2SO4 and figured why not use my free dessicator( backyard) to salvage the ammonium sulfate also? I do already have 40#'s or so for the lawn in the shed, but better than down the drain. fertilizer and ceramic material, nothing to waste
IMAG0285.jpg - 1.1MB IMAG0290.jpg - 1.3MB IMAG0286.jpg - 1.4MB


[Edited on 22-6-2014 by violet sin]

kristofvagyok - 22-6-2014 at 11:13




The reaction of triphenylphosphine with lithium.

When adding lithium metal (those near shiny lumps floating over there) to a solution of triphenylphopshine in tetrahydrofuran, phenyl lithium and lithium diphenylphosphide will form (that orange colored thing at the surface of the lithium). The reaction will only happen if the solvent does not contain any water, but when it starts, the whole solution will turn blood red in a few minutes.

arkoma - 24-6-2014 at 09:24

only camera I have since my digi broke is a crappy webcam *sigh*

Crude piperine being crashed out of isopropanol with ice cubes

sasan - 24-6-2014 at 09:36


arkoma did you extract it from black pepper?it has yellowish color

arkoma - 24-6-2014 at 09:46

Yes, extracted a quarter pound of "Safeway" brand ground black pepper. The oil is layering out nicely in the bottom of my beaker. Wish I had a better camera :(

Edit--Me, through a "rose" colored filter. Red rose pigment, aqueous extract dried on a glass plate



[Edited on 6-25-2014 by arkoma]

2014-06-24-192212.jpg - 51kB

bob800 - 25-6-2014 at 18:19

acetate.jpg - 58kB

A sodium acetate solution made by boiling down vinegar & baking soda (hence the amber impurities).

HeYBrO - 28-6-2014 at 03:34

benzoic acid from toluene. I should warn that it is important to limit exposure to toluene, as right now i feel dizzy and have headache. Manganese dioxide get absolutely everywhere too. Fun synth otherwise.

IMG_1558.jpg - 2.1MB

IMG_1515.jpg - 1.7MB

[Edited on 28-6-2014 by HeYBrO]

The Volatile Chemist - 30-6-2014 at 07:09

Quote:
Beaut-i-mous to me. Rose leaves refluxing in acetone. The maid cleaned AROUND it. (Living in a motel ATM) Nevada puts up with anything if yer not on dope or stealing LOL

That's hilarious. Did she ask what it was :)?
When and where did you get your rig?

arkoma - 30-6-2014 at 08:02

When I moved in here after fight with daugther-in-law (over the non-existent meth lab) I explained to the manager and housekeeping what I was doing. They asked me to keep the flasks inside so as not to alarm the other guests LOL.

I got my rig a couple three weeks ago as a gift from a generous member on this board. See this post.

Same member was "griping", "wheres the pictures of what your doing?".
"Uh, my little Kodak digi broke".
"Well, I sent you one".

So, I'll be filling this thread up! (camera arrives today)

alexleyenda - 30-6-2014 at 09:16

XD that's really cool. It looks like someone likes you :p

arkoma - 30-6-2014 at 09:31

I had to ask my 19 year old niece WTF is this "XD" crap just last week.......

The Volatile Chemist - 30-6-2014 at 11:08

Quote: Originally posted by arkoma  
I had to ask my 19 year old niece WTF is this "XD" crap just last week.......

I didn't figure it out till a month ago lol, I don't have a phone (YOU can't track me murica, hahahaha!) :P

Texium (zts16) - 30-6-2014 at 13:54

They can track you just fine on whatever it is you post on here with!
I've just come to accept it. I have nothing to hide.

arkoma - 30-6-2014 at 15:10

Way Off Topic LOL

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
(YOU can't track me murica, hahahaha!) :P


Read "Little Brother" by Corey Doctorow

[rant]I post "F*** You NSA" regularly on FB. If they come for me in middle of the night I'd rather be dead anyway[/rant]

Amos - 30-6-2014 at 15:19

Arkoma, what forum did you post that last bit about your rig in? I can't seem to access it :(

arkoma - 30-6-2014 at 15:21

Whimsy--ya need around 50 posts b4 mods will let you in. Didna want it accessible to any nutter that "just wandered in" (guests, actually)

alexleyenda - 30-6-2014 at 15:34

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  

I didn't figure it out till a month ago lol, I don't have a phone (YOU can't track me murica, hahahaha!) :P


I don't have a phone either :D but hey, common it is used a lot on internet too !

The Volatile Chemist - 1-7-2014 at 06:43

Yea. I just meant they couldn't track my LOCATION every second by built in GPS, that's all :)

arkoma - 1-7-2014 at 08:33



Concentrating rose hip extract (in acetone)

Texium (zts16) - 1-7-2014 at 09:42

Cool, looks like you got your new camera.
Also, those duct-taped joints are looking great! ;)

sasan - 4-7-2014 at 04:14



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sasan - 4-7-2014 at 04:16


top left is zinc phosphide
top right copper tetraiodomercurate
bottom left is zinc sulfide
bottom right is copper tungstate

sasan - 4-7-2014 at 04:20



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