Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Pretty Pictures (2)

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The Volatile Chemist - 3-9-2014 at 13:52

Great! Looks pretty :) Enjoy looking at your blog!

Brain&Force - 4-9-2014 at 15:39

<a href='http://i.imgur.com/sHBDdQA' title=''><img src='http://i.imgur.com/sHBDdQA.jpg' width=800 title="I have a clearer image..." /></a>

The pic is blurry but it's easy to see how intense the rain was: the rainbow extended below the ground, as there was enough mist on the windshield to continue the bow.

jock88 - 8-9-2014 at 13:37


That just means that the pot of gold was buried as opposed to sitting on top of the ground (as it usually is).

kristofvagyok - 8-9-2014 at 15:04

Doing some column chromatography with fluorescent reaction side products.









Thanks

Ionic Chemist - 10-9-2014 at 21:43

Thank you volatile... I'm working on retrieving some pretty okay pictures of when i did experiments with dyes i hope to have then on the blog soon.

The Volatile Chemist - 11-9-2014 at 14:45

great! I've always loved dyes work. Been reading one of the articles in sciencemadness library on them. What were you working on? I've been doing some theorizing myself on some procedures.

Ionic Chemist - 12-9-2014 at 09:13


Actually I'm not working on dyes specifically it was just an interest I'd developed after I got access to some fluorescein. However, I do hope in the future to once again dive back into dye chemistry, to be more specific though, more into fluorescent dyes and glow stick preparations. Synthesizing organic fluorescent dyes and seeing how they behave when substituted as the main fluorescers in glow stick reactions. As well since this thread is about pretty pictures here are the latest pictures used from my old experiment collection, just posted on www.lab-chemist.tumblr.com

Preparation of crude eosin dye by bromination of fluorescein...



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Thank You......

The Volatile Chemist - 13-9-2014 at 13:44

Sure! Those look great! Do they happen to fluoresce at all...?

kristofvagyok - 13-9-2014 at 14:36



That reddish-brown gunk is washed out with a little cold methanol and I will soon have some white crystals at the top of the funnel :D

numos - 13-9-2014 at 16:41

Some Nitrogen dioxide gas and liquid at the bottom (due to pressure).





NO2 (2).jpg - 251kB

Ionic Chemist - 15-9-2014 at 04:34



Yes Volatile, the crude eosin dye did fluoresce, well under the same conditions used for the fluorescein. However the colour was a deep red and I couldn't get a good show of the colours with my camera so I don't really have a good picture to show, but this is what I did capture though...


DSCN3467.JPG - 2.1MB


[Edited on 15-9-2014 by Ionic Chemist]

The Volatile Chemist - 15-9-2014 at 13:47

Nice! Wonderful pictures! Have you considered contributing to sciencemadness wiki (the link's in my sig)? Some of your procedures would be nice to have on there!

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

Brain&Force - 17-9-2014 at 09:38

You can now post chemistry photos to the Rador Labs Instagram account or videos to the Rador Labs YouTube account. Links are in my signature. U2U me for the password.

[Edited on 17.9.2014 by Brain&Force]

DraconicAcid - 17-9-2014 at 10:19

Quote: Originally posted by numos  
Some Nitrogen dioxide gas and liquid at the bottom (due to pressure).


Cool. What colour is the liquid? If it's blue, doesn't that mean that it's N2O3?

[Edited on 17-9-2014 by DraconicAcid]

kristofvagyok - 21-9-2014 at 12:37






Uranyl-nitrate hexahydrate under UV light.

Mailinmypocket - 28-9-2014 at 13:18

Copper wire after sitting for a day in dilute sulfuric acid/peroxide solution:

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The Volatile Chemist - 29-9-2014 at 05:18

Nice! (Peroxide accelerates reaction?)

Amos - 29-9-2014 at 10:52

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Nice! (Peroxide accelerates reaction?)


Apart from nitric acid, copper metal won't react with most acids unless there is an oxidizer present(hence the H2O2). I have a single crystal of CuSO4 that I've been growing for a while; it's bigger than the end of my thumb now.

[Edited on 9-29-2014 by No Tears Only Dreams Now]

bismuthate - 29-9-2014 at 10:58

Conc. boiling H2SO4 and copper do react but in a different way. Has anybody tried this?

Brain&Force - 29-9-2014 at 12:31

It forms sulfur dioxide and copper sulfate.

bismuthate - 29-9-2014 at 13:51

Yes but I was more trying to ask if anybody has actually tried it because it sounds like a nice experiment if anybody could tell me about procedures and such.

Morgan - 30-9-2014 at 12:05

I was trying to figure out how this strange cloud formed with wisps going out on either side of it. There's an airplane off to the left of it for size.

001 - Copy.JPG - 177kB

[Edited on 30-9-2014 by Morgan]

violet sin - 30-9-2014 at 12:11

a moisture pocket partly rolled across the interface of two bodies of air moving in opposing directions?

Jylliana - 3-10-2014 at 02:45


Lead(II) Iodide :)

Hi, i'm new here :D

The Volatile Chemist - 5-10-2014 at 13:27

Hi Jylliana!
Welcome to SM!
Hope you enjoy using the site! If you have any questions, U2U (kinda like PM-ing) someone. Nice picture, too!
I must comment, glad to see you are on the site! There are not very many females that are interested in chemistry, let alone state their gender.
Regardless of stereotypes, enjoy the site. Is there anything about chemistry you are particularly interested in? Specific branches?

-Nathan, The Volatile Chemist

Brain&Force - 5-10-2014 at 16:25

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Hi Jylliana!
Welcome to SM!
Hope you enjoy using the site! If you have any questions, U2U (kinda like PM-ing) someone. Nice picture, too!
I must comment, glad to see you are on the site! There are not very many females that are interested in chemistry, let alone state their gender.
Regardless of stereotypes, enjoy the site. Is there anything about chemistry you are particularly interested in? Specific branches?

-Nathan, The Volatile Chemist


Allow me to extend that welcome - we need more women not in professional STEM (TIL female astronomers and biologists outnumber male astronomers and biologists), but in hobby STEM, as that's where the interest grows.

Feel free to use the Sciencemadness Wikias a reference (and feel free to edit it as well). The thread discussing it has been topped and resides in Miscellaneous.

There's also the Rador Labs collaborative chemistry outreach project, which needs more interest and videos. Shoot me a U2U if you want the passwords.

Enjoy the site!

-B&F

The Volatile Chemist - 6-10-2014 at 16:17

B&F, always ready to advertise the resources he's made :)
Just kidding. If you need any help on how to use the site, just ask.

kristofvagyok - 11-10-2014 at 02:47




Found a 5000 cm3 Erlenmeyer flask written 0,5M NaOH solution of it and found these nice large crystals at the bottom. Single crystals of sodium hydrogencarbonate/carbonate.

Jylliana92 - 22-10-2014 at 10:13

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Hi Jylliana!
Welcome to SM!
Hope you enjoy using the site! If you have any questions, U2U (kinda like PM-ing) someone. Nice picture, too!
I must comment, glad to see you are on the site! There are not very many females that are interested in chemistry, let alone state their gender.
Regardless of stereotypes, enjoy the site. Is there anything about chemistry you are particularly interested in? Specific branches?

-Nathan, The Volatile Chemist


Hey Nathan & B&F,

Thanks for the welcome. I was not aware I was special lol :P
I've always seen myself as 'one of the boys'... in school I was the only female in my class. Never thought much of it.
I mostly like the 'kewl' chemistry, the spectacular, dramatic reactions(as long as it's safe. I tend to have a little too much 'respect' for some chemicals, almost fear them... not healthy, especially with my job, where I handle those chems almost daily.), and I see beauty in the tiniest reactions and displays, like the lead iodide crystals, or a water droplet skating off the hot plate(Leidenfrost effect ftw:cool: ).
I work as a School Science Tech on a high school. I assist the teachers with their practical classes. My background is Analytical Chemistry(chromatografy, spectrometry that sort of stuff).
I love teaching, and my goal is to make every student love chemistry as much as I love it :D

Rador Labs sound like an awesome initiative. Fighting chemophobia through education, always a good idea :D



[Edited on 22-10-2014 by Jylliana92]

HeYBrO - 25-10-2014 at 14:23

Tried bfesser's Copper(II) Aspirinate Synthesis
Which turned out quite well.



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Texium (zts16) - 27-10-2014 at 14:34

Here's some copper(II) chloride crystals that I set out to crystallize months ago but wasn't able to retrieve until today, because they had been guarded by angry yellow jackets until now.

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The Volatile Chemist - 27-10-2014 at 16:25

Nice! Were the yellow-jackets attracted to the crystals? :)

Brain&Force - 27-10-2014 at 17:16

Beautiful! I love how the copper chloride crystals have green tints - did you grow them in excess HCl?

pneumatician - 28-10-2014 at 17:23

now a little video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTb640Rbq74

Texium (zts16) - 28-10-2014 at 17:40

Quote: Originally posted by Brain&Force  
Beautiful! I love how the copper chloride crystals have green tints - did you grow them in excess HCl?
Yes, there was a little bit of HCl. I didn't want them to be too green. The first batch that I made was, and I didn't think it looked representative of the compound. I like the way these turned out since they're mostly aqua colored with some green highlights. Especially cool is that the green only becomes visible when you hold it up to the light.

wish i had a kraken!!! - 28-10-2014 at 22:08

:D

[Edited on 29-10-2014 by wish i had a kraken!!!]

New Bitmap Image (4).bmp - 2.7MB

The Volatile Chemist - 31-10-2014 at 05:37

Quote: Originally posted by Brain&Force  
Beautiful! I love how the copper chloride crystals have green tints - did you grow them in excess HCl?

It appears they were grown in excess HCl, but at least some of that excess evaporated off, because the crystal color changes partway. Not that basement evaporation (what I do) is better than outside. :)

Jylliana - 3-11-2014 at 00:15


Strontium Chloride.


Strontium Chloride transferred to a vial.


Copper Chloride in a petridish, crystallized from a mixture of 50% acetone and 50% water.

[Edited on 3-11-2014 by Jylliana]

Eddygp - 3-11-2014 at 10:10

Those are LARGE pictures... I liked the second one, because it has a sort of gooey feeling to it, while obviously being a group of crystals.

The Volatile Chemist - 3-11-2014 at 16:49

Nice work Jylliana! Inspiring! I like the strontium chloride especially! Looks rather pure, too! I might recommend the acetate as well, it, too, has a nice looking crystal structure.

Brain&Force - 13-11-2014 at 10:33

<img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B2DdPYTCQAAExs0.jpg" title="Can someone find the transition point of pyranine for me?" width=800>

To celebrate 1000 posts and a year on the forum, here is one of my favorite pictures of all time: pyranine in neutral to progressively more acidic environments. The dye's fluorescence changes from green to blue.

I may make a video series regarding fluorescent pH indicators from highlighters.

mayko - 13-11-2014 at 20:12

I work in a Drosophila lab, and in particular I've been doing some scanning electron microscopy. Here's some cool stuff I've seen:

The samples get sputter-coated so that charge doesn't build up on a nonconductive surface. Basically I blast a fly in the face with plasma.

plasma_in_the_face.jpg - 110kB

Here's the microscope itself:

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Things get pretty Lovecraftian at this scale. Eeesh.

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In the back room of the SEM lab: Oh, you know, osmium tetroxide, sitting on the lab bench, chillin'.
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And an open bottle of this lovely substance.
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(There was also a bottle of 'uranyl acetate waste', but it's not very photogenic unless you really like the color yellow.)


Oscilllator - 14-11-2014 at 00:50

From the look of that can, that's an utterly ridiculous amount of osmium tetroxide to have. The picture makes it look like that's a 1.5L can. Surely I am missing something here?

Tsjerk - 14-11-2014 at 03:47

Doesn't it say 250mg on the left top? These cans always contain a load of packing material against breaking.

The Volatile Chemist - 14-11-2014 at 05:13

That's crazy. How much did THAT cost? And what's wrong with permanganate? Or do you always recover the osmium Tetroxide?

Tsjerk - 14-11-2014 at 08:33

According to Sigma 64 euro.

DraconicAcid - 14-11-2014 at 09:21

Quote: Originally posted by Tsjerk  
Doesn't it say 250mg on the left top? These cans always contain a load of packing material against breaking.


Yes- the can's not full of osmium tetroxide, it's full of vermiculite. In the middle of the vermiculite, there's a small bottle of OsO4.

Mailinmypocket - 20-11-2014 at 14:24

The condenser water was too cold during a distillation of benzene. It froze in the condenser, swapping the cold water for cool water melted it right away.


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The Volatile Chemist - 21-11-2014 at 06:40

Quote: Originally posted by Mailinmypocket  
The condenser water was too cold during a distillation of benzene. It froze in the condenser, swapping the cold water for cool water melted it right away.



Wow, that's crazy. I never thought of benzene as being something that could do that, but I guess it makes sense. You could almost put a 'cold finger' (a piece of glassware for all who do not know) over such a flask, though I supposed it wouldn't be removed enough from the heat source.

Mailinmypocket - 21-11-2014 at 08:45

The cooling water had ice in it and I forgot about benzene having a melting point of about 5.5 Celsius. A cold finger probably would have some benzene solidify onto it but in this case benzene was being synthesized so the temperature in the steel vessel obviously would be too high for a cold finger to even remotely work. Making this stuff is tedious by the way... Fill reaction vessel, heat, distill, empty clinker stuff, repeat. Ugh.

Selenium dissolving in sodium sulfide solution

Mailinmypocket - 26-11-2014 at 07:12



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j_sum1 - 26-11-2014 at 07:23

Mailinmypocket, that looks truly stunning. (I bet it didn't smell as good as it looks!)
Do you mind if I ask what kind of experimentation you were attempting?

Mailinmypocket - 26-11-2014 at 07:31

Thank you! The smell was typical egg fart variety :) I was going to make some selenium dioxide but got sidetracked by Woelens page on selenium and thought it looked too pretty to not try:

http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/exps/se_chemistry...

I also made a time lapse of selenium dust floating on top of the sodium sulfide:
http://youtu.be/hYXiRPA-Klo

[Edited on 26-11-2014 by Mailinmypocket]

j_sum1 - 26-11-2014 at 07:43

Vid looks cool too.
Unfortunately woelen's website is blocked by the security settings on my work laptop. There have been a few links to his site that I have not been able to read. I will have to get that rectified but it means a chat to the IT staff.

Jylliana - 28-11-2014 at 06:09


My silver bar remelted ^_^

I held it in a bunsen burner for a while with a pair of tongs and the silver started dripping, to catch it I placed a large beaker with cold water underneath. This is the result.

The Volatile Chemist - 28-11-2014 at 17:19

Wow, rather pretty! And a pretty good deal of Ag there.

Jylliana - 29-11-2014 at 02:43

The original bar was 10grams. I might have lost some because I have done some other experiments with it before melting it, but not much.

curelom - 8-12-2014 at 18:36

Wow, that silver is stunning, Jylliana!

I'm new here, and just looked through this whole thread. I really enjoyed the photos, everyone! :)

Jylliana - 8-12-2014 at 23:07

Welcome to ScienceMadness, curelom :)
I hope you enjoy it here ^_^

Hellafunt - 9-12-2014 at 17:34

This is my fave mineral, wulfenite. I took the pic at a museum in Toronto, I can't think of the name right now. i like it because it looks like peanut brittle (the mineral, not the museum.)

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[Edited on 10-12-2014 by Hellafunt]

Atrum - 9-12-2014 at 19:43

Hello, I am new here.
I've been teaching my self chemistry for a while now and find that I could use someone to bounce my thoughts off of once in a while.

I look forward to becoming an active member here.

I'll start things off with my own pretty picture.

Potassium nitrate crystals.

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[Edited on 10-12-2014 by Atrum]

Bert - 10-12-2014 at 12:06




NOT a pretty picture, actually!

Zyklon-A - 10-12-2014 at 18:37

Welcome to the forum Atrum! I too started out teaching myself, it's a great way to learn.
Potassium nitrate is still one of my favorite compounds to recrystallize, and I just bought 5 pounds of the stuff, so I'll be crystallizing it soon.

Atrum - 11-12-2014 at 17:18

Thanks Zyklon.

Here are a few more from my past experiments.

1. NO2 gas
2. Luminol (made from otc chemicals)
3. Copper acetate crystals


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[Edited on 12-12-2014 by Atrum]

curelom - 11-12-2014 at 17:53

Nice pictures, Atrum! I love the copper acetate crystals. About how big are they? :)

-Mariah :)

Atrum - 11-12-2014 at 19:05

Quote: Originally posted by curelom  
Nice pictures, Atrum! I love the copper acetate crystals. About how big are they? :)

-Mariah :)


Thanks, they are about the size of a lima bean.

Zyklon-A - 11-12-2014 at 19:21

Nice, how'd you make the N2O4/NO2?
Is it dry?

Atrum - 11-12-2014 at 19:31

Quote: Originally posted by Zyklon-A  
Nice, how'd you make the N2O4/NO2?
Is it dry?


The NO2 was a by product from when I made nitric acid.
I decided to capture some of it because I thought that it looked cool.

I used a nitrate salt, HCl, and some copper. I fed the gases into cold 35% H2O2.
It is not dry.

[Edited on 12-12-2014 by Atrum]

blargish - 13-12-2014 at 15:08

Some different crystalline compounds:

1. Potassium Tetraperoxochromate(V)
2. Copper(II) Chloride Dihydrate
3. TCCA (crystallized from acetone)





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UnintentionalChaos - 13-12-2014 at 17:20

Orgsyn says "Approximately 500 g. of cracked ice is added, and then, with mechanical stirring, the diazonium salt solution is run in as rapidly as possible. The mixture becomes a bright orangered." during the prep of phenylhydrazine. They're not kidding, man.


Jylliana - 15-12-2014 at 08:41





Made fluorescein today :)
Unfortunately my fingers now do fluoresce as well, while I thought I worked in a really clean way :(

Jylliana - 18-12-2014 at 04:21


Two beads of aluminum among other stuff that didn't melt properly.

The Volatile Chemist - 18-12-2014 at 10:17

Those are really pretty pictures. Where'd the aluminum above come form, Jylliana?

Jylliana - 18-12-2014 at 10:22

It was just aluminium foil. It does melt, but it required a lot of effort to do that, partly because my burner isn't very hot.

Copper Crystals

I Like Dots - 18-12-2014 at 14:56

I have been growing some copper crystals recently.
I use a computer power supply, 3.3v carrying about 16 amps. I use a sulfuric acid/copper sulfate bath. I am not sure about the amounts, as i have been constantly adjusting the concentration, but it is about 100g/L of copper sulfate, and enough acid to bring the pH to 2-3. Recently, Ive added 60ppm chloride (HCl) because I read on a plating forum that chloride ions inhibit dendrites, which is good for growing larger nodules.
The crystals take about 2 days to grow.

Here are some pictures, and I made a video here if you want to see more!








[Edited on 18-12-2014 by I Like Dots]

Jylliana - 18-12-2014 at 22:47

Wow, that looks really cool!
What electrodes did you use? I wanna try this myself :D

Mailinmypocket - 20-12-2014 at 11:32

The color inside freshly broken calcium carbide is quite neat looking


image.jpg - 2MB

I Like Dots - 20-12-2014 at 19:01

Jylliana i just used copper for both! Watch my video i show exactly what i did.

wish i had a kraken!!! - 21-12-2014 at 09:10



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The Volatile Chemist - 21-12-2014 at 14:23

kraken, what IS that?
And the copper 'crystals' are really nice, I might try that.

wish i had a kraken!!! - 21-12-2014 at 23:41

It supposed to be a multichannel needle ! :-D , And to be honest I didn't find a proper use for it till now , If U know it is gonna be useful somewhere, Plz let me Know .

And for copper crystals Ya , u'd better try them :-D

Just Like what I did a year ago!



[Edited on 22-12-2014 by wish i had a kraken!!!]

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Partway through a permanganate oxidation of p-nitrotoluene

Metacelsus - 22-12-2014 at 10:31



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gdflp - 25-12-2014 at 09:03

Merry Christmas! Here's a chemical rainbow I made, anyone care to guess what the different colors are?(Hint : All but Red, Indigo and Purple are inorganic)

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cyanureeves - 25-12-2014 at 09:17

#2 is potasium dichromate,#4 is nickel sulfate,#5 is copper sulfate,#6 is tetraamine copper nitrate #7 was scooped off the back yard?:D

[Edited on 12-25-2014 by cyanureeves] #7 is copper acetylide.on magnification it looks very pretty actually.

[Edited on 12-25-2014 by cyanureeves]

cyanureeves - 25-12-2014 at 09:24

the purple is organic?

gdflp - 25-12-2014 at 09:25

#2 is a dichromate, ammonium actually, #4 isn't a nickel salt, #5 is copper sulfate, #6 isn't tetraamine copper nitrate, #7 isn't copper acetylide. The purple is a complex between an inorganic and organic compound.

[Edited on 12-25-2014 by gdflp]

Metacelsus - 25-12-2014 at 10:10

#3 could be a chromate salt, or possibly a ferric salt. #7 is an ethylenediamine nickel complex.

gdflp - 25-12-2014 at 10:12

#3 is ammonium chromate, #7 is not an ethylenediamine nickel complex

Zyklon-A - 25-12-2014 at 10:15

1- cobalt chloride? 4- copper chloride?

Mailinmypocket - 25-12-2014 at 10:22

Is the purple an indicator? Dichloroindophenol?

gdflp - 25-12-2014 at 10:38

The purple isn't an indicator, it's a complex. #1 is an organic indicator, #4 is CuCl4 2- Huh, the superscripts aren't working.

[Edited on 12-25-2014 by gdflp]

alexleyenda - 25-12-2014 at 23:36

#1 is probably phenolphtaleine
#2/3/5 were easy to guess :p
#4 I learned something, didn't know that one :D
#6 I got no idea, i'm gonna learn something again !
#7 could be Salicylic acid /iron complex (maybe with FeCl3) ... or maybe a dilute iodine/starch complex but yeah.. I definitely think it's a salicylic acid/iron complex

gdflp - 26-12-2014 at 07:58

Yep, #1 is phenolphthalein, #7 is a dilute salicylic acid/ferric chloride complex, #6 is dilute methylene blue.

The Volatile Chemist - 26-12-2014 at 09:27

Nice gdftp. I was thinking a Fe(II) tannate or something for #7.

Bert - 27-12-2014 at 12:38

This is pretty!

Bot0nist - 27-12-2014 at 12:44

Wow. That looks unreal... I've never seen powder rockets used in a way. I wonder if a smaller concept could be made using rcandy engines...

Bert - 27-12-2014 at 12:56

It's called different things in various cultures: "girondola", "table rocket", "flying crown", "tourbilion", "UFO"...

Search for girondola on Youtube, lots of videos in all sizes and many different configurations. But THAT one is the biggest I've ever seen!

[Edited on 27-12-2014 by Bert]

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[Edited on 27-12-2014 by Bert]

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[Edited on 27-12-2014 by Bert]

Brain&Force - 2-1-2015 at 19:03

*jaw re-excavates foundation*

http://www.reddit.com/tb/2r5gmy

The Volatile Chemist - 5-1-2015 at 14:22

That's a crazy collection.
Bet there's a bit of 'air pollution' going on there.

DraconicAcid - 9-1-2015 at 11:00

Crystals of tris(ethylenediamine)nickel(II) oxalate. I was trying to make a bis(en) complex with a coordinated oxalate, but refluxing was not taking off the third en ligand, nor was heating the solid to over 300 oC.

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