Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Pretty Pictures (2)

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alexleyenda - 19-2-2015 at 19:31

Yep, it's the famous silver tree. They're crystals. At the beginning they are needle shaped cristals up to 5 mm long, and as the reaction goes on, branches of very small crystals form on the first crystals, so thin that light is absorbed or trapped in there so that's why the silver look so dark. The dark very small crystals look like a powder tho. It is very fragile, actually it really looks like a tree, when you shake it a bit all the "branches" move. If you shake it hard, it all falls.

In fact, if you shake it hard, it falls just like that :


agno3.jpg - 70kB agno32.jpg - 42kB

Edit : put back the original photo for easier comparison

[Edited on 20-2-2015 by alexleyenda]

Zombie - 19-2-2015 at 19:39

It really is stunning. I guess you could compare the growth the a fractile.

To me, this is the coolest thread on the forum. It's inspiring.

The Volatile Chemist - 23-2-2015 at 12:29

Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
It really is stunning. I guess you could compare the growth the a fractile.

To me, this is the coolest thread on the forum. It's inspiring.

I agree! I love all of the crystalline products here. By the way, nice title ("Forum Hillbilly") :)

Zombie - 23-2-2015 at 12:35

Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
It really is stunning. I guess you could compare the growth the a fractile.

To me, this is the coolest thread on the forum. It's inspiring.


I see my use of a made up, quasi English language confirms the "Forum HillBilly" title.

Soooo embarrassing... :(

alexleyenda - 2-3-2015 at 21:21

For the first time in months I had a little free time, so I decided to extract cinnamaldehyde. Here are a few photos ; it has a red color under bright light, a brown color under weak light, and a yellow color diluted in a little bit of ether. I got that ether (last photo) by condensation of ethanol in conc. sulfuric acid at 145°C. That was clearly one of the most frightening reaction I have done :p

c2.jpg - 40kB c3.jpg - 33kB

c1.jpg - 42kB ether.jpg - 50kB

[Edited on 3-3-2015 by alexleyenda]

Bot0nist - 2-3-2015 at 21:36

Very beautiful! I agree, distilling diethyl ether can be a bit nerve racking with its low auto ignition temp. Thanks for sharing.

Zombie - 3-3-2015 at 15:21

alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?

gdflp - 3-3-2015 at 15:25

Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


It's a very rare thing called snow;) which you, being a lucky bastard in Florida, would know nothing of right now unlike those of us who are up north.:mad: It reduces the evaporation of the ether product.

Loptr - 3-3-2015 at 15:29

Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


Lol. It's pretty contagious too as we just received over a foot and should be getting more on Thursday. The East Coast is getting buried.

alexleyenda - 3-3-2015 at 15:53

Quote: Originally posted by gdflp  
Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


It's a very rare thing called snow;) which you, being a lucky bastard in Florida, would know nothing of right now unlike those of us who are up north.:mad: It reduces the evaporation of the ether product.

That would be a right answer hahaha. There was snow all round me so it was easier to take that than prepare an ice bath. Anyway the ice bath would have become a real 100% ice bath if I had used that. I'm from Québec, Canada before you ask :p

fluorescence - 4-3-2015 at 03:59

Not really sure what this is, I guess it is some form of
K6[Co2(CN)10]. If you treat Cobalt(II)-Solutions with a low amount of Cyanide you'll get Co(II)cyanide, analogous to Nickel. If you continue to add more Cyanide the quite muddy looking thick brown cyanide goes into a green [Co(CN)5H2O]3-. This compound is sensitive to oxygen, so you'll have to work in oxygen-free water and under inert gas. I did it with regular destilled water and without any inert gas so the green complex wouldn't even build up and directly went into it's oxidized from which is a reddish solution. I am not sure what the composition of that exactly is. But if you manage to get the green complex and add enough Ethanol purple crystalls of K6[Co2(CN)10] should fall out. I did it with the red solution and the same happened. But since most cyanides and cyano-compounds of heavy metals are insoluble in Ethanol this could be any other Co-Cyano-Salt.

The color still fits and perhaps the reddish color of the solution came from rests of Co(II)cyanide, could be. There is a Co(III)cyanide but that one is blue, so this shouldn't be it, still this stuff reacts with water to a reddish Hydrate. Since the color of the crystals fit I'd rather go with K6[Co2(CN)10]. It's hard to see but that stuff is actually the Cobalt Version von Potassium Ferrocyanide. You could write it like that but data on the complex showed that it's rather written down as mentioned above.

Still quite interesting, the chemistry of Cobalt-Cyano-Complexes. Stay up for more in summer. I'm currently planing a whole bunch of d-Metal complexes. Just went through a dozen of literature and still not finished yet. Till now it looks preatty cool and I'll try to make most of these forgotten compounds, soon. The one mentioned here is an example from the cobalt section but there are far better ones.

So I hope you like it :D.




EDIT:

So I isolated the brown-purple stuff and dissolved it in some water again and got a perfect yellow solution. That color is quite typical for the Hexacyanocobaltate(III). That stuff is like the Iron version quite unreactive and should -according to literature - not react with Peroxide in any way. I tried it and nothing happened. Co(II) and Cyanide can be boiled with oxygen for some time to get that stuff but it's quite cold in my lab and that stuff still build up. So I'm not sure what the intermediate produrct was, there are some complexes mentioned with 5 cyano ligands and one other like water or OH- depending on ration and amount of air. Could be one of them and this was oxidized while shaking it in the testtube with air to the yellow Cobaltate(III). There is quite some stuff you can try out here especially when you work under argon.
Cobalt.jpg - 48kB

[Edited on 4-3-2015 by fluorescence]

Zombie - 4-3-2015 at 04:58

Quote: Originally posted by gdflp  
Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


It's a very rare thing called snow;) which you, being a lucky bastard in Florida, would know nothing of right now unlike those of us who are up north.:mad: It reduces the evaporation of the ether product.



Oh yes. I have heard of this "snow".

Much like Mr. blogfast, and the mythical "thumper" i did not believe such a thing really existed. :D

Now I really feel stupid~~~~~:(

PHILOU Zrealone - 4-3-2015 at 05:37

S=N-O-W :)
Tungsten (I) thionitrite

LoL :D ;)

Zombie - 4-3-2015 at 20:50

one nothing, plus one nothing, always equals two nothings, no matter what anyone says.

Sorry.

Infinite mass or perfect vacuum... take your pick. :)

[Edited on 3-5-2015 by Zombie]

The Volatile Chemist - 5-3-2015 at 09:18

Infinite mass :) We've been getting a lot of snow in the mid-west of Ohio.

alexleyenda - 5-3-2015 at 13:43

I just received a piece of Bismuth, nothing special but I always loved the look of shiny metallic shards of bismuth.

11040768_534994893309921_720935822_n.jpg - 85kB

MrHomeScientist - 5-3-2015 at 14:04

Me too! Keep an eye on that piece - freshly broken, it's nice and silvery. But over time it oxidizes very slowly, and develops a yellow tinge.

The Volatile Chemist - 5-3-2015 at 14:42

Nice picture! I was looking at SM today, and someone was looking over my shoulder; got a nice 'silver tree' discussion started with them because of this page.

PHILOU Zrealone - 7-3-2015 at 06:01

Quote: Originally posted by alexleyenda  
I just received a piece of Bismuth, nothing special but I always loved the look of shiny metallic shards of bismuth.

I prefer the cristalline Bismuth with fractalo-cubic-Maya-temple shape and petroleum iridescent colour :D
Bsimuth cristals images

I own quite a lot from mineral Bourses/Fairs/Saloon at relatively cheap prices.
Also from such places cristaline Silicium, cristaline Carborundum (SiC) and Quartz Gold Aqua (transparent colorless Quartz that turns pale blue owing to gold atoms inserted into cristal latice by special rays), Quartz Titanium (the same but with Titanium...display metallic look with petrol iridescence),...

[Edited on 7-3-2015 by PHILOU Zrealone]

The Volatile Chemist - 7-3-2015 at 14:37

I love the way crystals is spelled in your link :)
I have a nice background picture for twitter, I think: https://twitter.com/volatilechemguy

Mercury (I) Bromide

Gooferking Science - 8-3-2015 at 09:59

Just made this mercury (I) bromide. Fluoresces salmon color under UV light.

Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 12.34.16 PM.png - 1.4MB Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 12.58.08 PM.png - 2MB

The Volatile Chemist - 8-3-2015 at 12:27

That's unique! I just made some copper(I) ferricyanide (Or ferrocyanide, I'm not entirely sure that the ferricyanide didn't get reduced...

alexleyenda - 8-3-2015 at 12:28

Quote: Originally posted by Gooferking Science  
Just made this mercury (I) bromide. Fluoresces salmon color under UV light.


That sounds like dangerous stuff, but I like the colors :p

Jimmymajesty - 19-3-2015 at 14:27

Mg+NaCl thermite :)

IMG_3611.JPG - 734kB

j_sum1 - 19-3-2015 at 14:43

Quote: Originally posted by Jimmymajesty  
Mg+NaCl thermite :)


Winner of the conflagrations competition (and about ten bucks) except that you didn't enter.
Nice photo. Well done. :)

fluorescence - 23-3-2015 at 05:41

Hopefully some Tetracyanocuprate(II). It's said to be purple if you find anything mention about it in Literature. Usually you'll get Cu(I)Cyanide and then Tetracyanocuprate(I) which should give you a green to orange solution depending on the conc. of KCN. But obviousely although not very stable over time you can get Cu(II)Cyanide, too. Which I think has a really beautiful color. I even got a darker version but I couldn't get it on cam and it was more intense than on the picture. I guess my camera doesn't really pick up colors that well.

So I found 2 short sentences in Literature. The Cu(II)Cyanide is yellow and Cu(I) is white. And the complex is purple. So this should be the complex. I did some yellow-green precipitate, too that later turned puprle when I stirred it. So this could be Cu(II)Cyanide but I'd say that Cu(I)Cyanide does appear a quite similar color. So not sure about these two but well the Cuprate(II) seems to exist with it's purple color.


Cu(II)Cyanide.png - 631kB

[Edited on 23-3-2015 by fluorescence]

Jimmymajesty - 23-3-2015 at 09:46

Oh I never won anything with chemistry except some elementary school competitions. I selected my friends by looking at their hands during these competitions. The more nitric acid bite marks on their hands the more likely they knew the score, today its kinda the opposite:)

Anyway after the termite burned I dropped it onto some water, it bounced and gave off a moderate "Puff" due to elemental sodium, it is good to have kids around to have them grind the Mg powder off the 2kg block though.

Jimmymajesty - 24-3-2015 at 13:21

Oxidation of ethanol vapors with Pt foil :)

IMG_3625.JPG - 442kB

karlos³ - 25-3-2015 at 10:21

Two chemistry books I luckily acquired!
One is from 1913 (the one on the left) and the other about organic chemistry is from 1908!
So cool, and they were so cheap!



Pieces of history, pre-world war, so cool to own, i was so happy the day i found them (dusted, in an antiquarian bookshop) :D

[Edited on 25-3-2015 by karlos³]

Texium (zts16) - 25-3-2015 at 16:38

Quote: Originally posted by Jimmymajesty  
Oh I never won anything with chemistry except some elementary school competitions.
He was just saying that you probably would have won the Rador Labs Chemical Conflagrations challenge had you entered that picture. I would have to agree. Since you seem to have a knack for photographing chemistry, you may want to keep an eye out for our future challenges, which may involve similar things.

The Volatile Chemist - 26-3-2015 at 13:38

Quote: Originally posted by zts16  
Quote: Originally posted by Jimmymajesty  
Oh I never won anything with chemistry except some elementary school competitions.
He was just saying that you probably would have won the Rador Labs Chemical Conflagrations challenge had you entered that picture. I would have to agree. Since you seem to have a knack for photographing chemistry, you may want to keep an eye out for our future challenges, which may involve similar things.

I just passed the local portion of the Chemistry olympiad, and will be moving onto the nationals. If I do well in that, I get a trip to Colorado.... Nice work Jimmy!

quantumcorespacealchemyst - 1-4-2015 at 15:25

that looks like an induction coil there, nice. If you will, what is the rest of the setu? Does the oxidized gas get channeled to another reaction? Also, I read that Mg dust embedded in the skin (lungs by assumption) can cause local malignant tumor growth. I recommend a facemask/respirator for any assistants who do not know/are uncomfortable with the nature of the dust in grinding. Goggles too maybe, like swimming goggles perhaps?

smaerd - 4-4-2015 at 16:16

So these aren't home-lab photos but I'm pretty stoked about them.

A couple shots of a few molecules I've been working with for the past two or so months.


First picture is compound thats red on the column and purple in solution(base compound). Please don't judge the column pack job it was a quick separation. Chloroform to remove a fast runner and methonal to wipe the solid phase (zwitterionic isomer is sticky) which is why there is half semi-white(stationary phase) and half red (target).

The second picture is a conjugate that is purple in solution(multistep synthesis), and the other is red in solution(prosthetic compound for tests).

column.JPG - 179kB DSCF0014.png - 526kB oxazolo.png - 678kB

[Edited on 5-4-2015 by smaerd]

HgDinis25 - 7-4-2015 at 13:01

Here are some beautiful pictures of Nitrocellulose flames:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/48fcoxrxrxgtvj2/1.PNG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/w5yq8luw1m7ji2g/2.PNG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/njb9x4vld37mglr/4.PNG?dl=0

I have a few more (and a video with slow motion) here:
https://hobbychemistry.wordpress.com/2015/04/03/burning-nitr...

EDIT: Can't post pictures, not exactly sure why...

[Edited on 7-4-2015 by HgDinis25]

Zombie - 7-4-2015 at 13:13

Very nice Picts. HgDinis25.

The Video with the slow motion effect was also quite fun to watch.

Nice job.

HgDinis25 - 8-4-2015 at 03:56

Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
Very nice Picts. HgDinis25.

The Video with the slow motion effect was also quite fun to watch.

Nice job.


Thanks! I'll make sure to place more pics here, every now and then :D

HgDinis25 - 9-4-2015 at 15:16

https://www.dropbox.com/s/gs1qhfkryx9ro9l/SAM_0867.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1pagy6vy6q0iy6b/SAM_0869.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/uzkkhfhyskyo5ug/SAM_0872.JPG?dl=0

Can anyone guess what these are?

Hint:
https://hobbychemistry.wordpress.com/2015/04/09/synthesis-of...

DraconicAcid - 9-4-2015 at 16:15

Quote: Originally posted by HgDinis25  
https://www.dropbox.com/s/gs1qhfkryx9ro9l/SAM_0867.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1pagy6vy6q0iy6b/SAM_0869.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/uzkkhfhyskyo5ug/SAM_0872.JPG?dl=0

Can anyone guess what these are?

Hint:
https://hobbychemistry.wordpress.com/2015/04/09/synthesis-of...


Nice crystals, and nice write-up, but please don't capitalize the names of compounds or elements. They aren't people.

Also, you mention "tin(II) dioxide" in your write-up. That should be tin dioxide, or tin(IV) oxide.

HgDinis25 - 9-4-2015 at 16:20

Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
Quote: Originally posted by HgDinis25  
https://www.dropbox.com/s/gs1qhfkryx9ro9l/SAM_0867.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1pagy6vy6q0iy6b/SAM_0869.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/uzkkhfhyskyo5ug/SAM_0872.JPG?dl=0

Can anyone guess what these are?

Hint:
https://hobbychemistry.wordpress.com/2015/04/09/synthesis-of...


Nice crystals, and nice write-up, but please don't capitalize the names of compounds or elements. They aren't people.

Also, you mention "tin(II) dioxide" in your write-up. That should be tin dioxide, or tin(IV) oxide.


Hehe the capitalization is a trend of mine and my own language. They aren't people but they are chemicals.

The Tin Dioxide part was bad though :P Thanks for the heads up!

Glad you liked the crystals. By the way, does anyone know why I can't put images in this post? I place these links as images and they don't show up.

The Volatile Chemist - 10-4-2015 at 17:18

Quote: Originally posted by HgDinis25  
Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
Quote: Originally posted by HgDinis25  
https://www.dropbox.com/s/gs1qhfkryx9ro9l/SAM_0867.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1pagy6vy6q0iy6b/SAM_0869.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/uzkkhfhyskyo5ug/SAM_0872.JPG?dl=0

Can anyone guess what these are?

Hint:
https://hobbychemistry.wordpress.com/2015/04/09/synthesis-of...


Nice crystals, and nice write-up, but please don't capitalize the names of compounds or elements. They aren't people.

Also, you mention "tin(II) dioxide" in your write-up. That should be tin dioxide, or tin(IV) oxide.


Hehe the capitalization is a trend of mine and my own language. They aren't people but they are chemicals.

The Tin Dioxide part was bad though :P Thanks for the heads up!

Glad you liked the crystals. By the way, does anyone know why I can't put images in this post? I place these links as images and they don't show up.

nice job, the crystals look great! Be sure to lacquer them if you want to preserve them.
The capitalization is something I do all the time. It's a hard habit to break, I understand. Somewhere during when I was homeschooled, I forgot that each word wasn't capitalized, and the difference between its and it's... :P

Argentum - 15-4-2015 at 14:19

Some nice Mn(NO3)2 crystals

Nice but contaminated, though.

20150415_190533.jpg - 3.7MB

blargish - 16-4-2015 at 07:46

Not the best quality pic in the world, but a cool effect seen when dark-brown crystals of potassium tetraperoxochromate(V) are put into hydrochloric acid, with the formation of a blue chromium oxide diperoxide complex: CrO(O2)2.


Screen Shot 2015-04-16 at 11.32.25 AM.png - 443kB

Zombie - 16-4-2015 at 17:01

I love this thread!

SupaVillain - 16-4-2015 at 19:20

The Sodium 2,4-Dinitrophenolate I used to sell on Ebay... still for sale just not on Ebay

dnp.png - 338kB

greenlight - 17-4-2015 at 04:44

Strontium nitrate and shellac mixture; not the prettiest, but still very nice to look at:
Won't let me rotate picture for some reason









[Edited on 17-4-2015 by greenlight]

20150417_200951.jpg - 4.3MB

[Edited on 17-4-2015 by greenlight]

20150417_200954.jpg - 4.6MB

violet sin - 17-4-2015 at 04:53

nice, care to edit in a description of the pic? lovely color

Bezaleel - 17-4-2015 at 04:59

Quote: Originally posted by fluorescence  
Hopefully some Tetracyanocuprate(II). It's said to be purple if you find anything mention about it in Literature. Usually you'll get Cu(I)Cyanide and then Tetracyanocuprate(I) which should give you a green to orange solution depending on the conc. of KCN. But obviousely although not very stable over time you can get Cu(II)Cyanide, too. Which I think has a really beautiful color. I even got a darker version but I couldn't get it on cam and it was more intense than on the picture. I guess my camera doesn't really pick up colors that well.

So I found 2 short sentences in Literature. The Cu(II)Cyanide is yellow and Cu(I) is white. And the complex is purple. So this should be the complex. I did some yellow-green precipitate, too that later turned puprle when I stirred it. So this could be Cu(II)Cyanide but I'd say that Cu(I)Cyanide does appear a quite similar color. So not sure about these two but well the Cuprate(II) seems to exist with it's purple color.

[Edited on 23-3-2015 by fluorescence]

Interesting to see that this is a purple compound, as cyanuric acid and copper(II) also combine to form a purple compound. So, the purple colour may well arise from the N-Cu bond, when N is also bonded to C.

greenlight - 17-4-2015 at 05:30

1 gram flask cracker's mid-pop made from potassium permanganate, sulphur, and aluminum flash:



[Edited on 17-4-2015 by greenlight]

Screenshot_2015-03-05-00-48-55-2.jpg - 1.7MB

[Edited on 17-4-2015 by greenlight]

[Edited on 17-4-2015 by greenlight]

Screenshot_2015-04-17-21-20-35.png - 2.5MB

neptunium - 17-4-2015 at 05:32

perhaps a high speed footage would be interesting as well .. but must be over 16000fps

greenlight - 17-4-2015 at 05:35

Yes, would be good, unfortunately don't have a good enough camera for this:(

DraconicAcid - 17-4-2015 at 08:04

Quote: Originally posted by Bezaleel  

Interesting to see that this is a purple compound, as cyanuric acid and copper(II) also combine to form a purple compound. So, the purple colour may well arise from the N-Cu bond, when N is also bonded to C.


Not surprising, actually- most amine-type copper(II) complexes are purple or blue-purple, [Cu(NH3)4]2+ being the prime example. The copper cyanide, however is a bit more surprising, as cyanide is a very strong-field ligand, and you'd expect a different colour.

The Volatile Chemist - 17-4-2015 at 12:57

Quote: Originally posted by blargish  
Not the best quality pic in the world, but a cool effect seen when dark-brown crystals of potassium tetraperoxochromate(V) are put into hydrochloric acid, with the formation of a blue chromium oxide diperoxide complex: CrO(O2)2.



Is the second complex isolate-able? Nice picture! SuperVillan, nice picture too!

mayko - 20-4-2015 at 19:06



Here's a couple I made with pictures taken via scanning electron microscopy, and colorized using GIMP and public-domain images from Wikimedia Commons. I entered an art contest with them at the university I work at ... didn't win, but they're decorating one of the chemistry buildings!





Third_Eye.jpeg - 2.3MB

"Dorsal Ocelli"
Insects are famous for their compound eyes; who hasn’t seen a microphotograph of the honeycombed lenses of an ant’s eye? Less well known is the fact that many insects also have simple eyes on the tops of their heads. Pictured here are the simple eyes of a fruit fly. What do they see? Light? Motion? Shape? What would it be like for humans to have two distinct forms of sight?







lovecraftian_horror_fly.jpeg - 2MB

“Are Lovecraftian Horrors Circling Your Bananas?”
Humans seem to have a kind of common sense, an intuition about how the world aroundthem looks and works. But because it's been built around what is common in human experience, it can lead to counterintuitive results on small spatial scales (quantum mechanics) or at very high velocities (relativity). Here's a less extreme example: this is the mouth of a fruit fly. Is this what you'd naturally associate with your household insect friends?

The Volatile Chemist - 21-4-2015 at 12:15

Nice! What method did you use to colorize them?

Volanschemia - 23-4-2015 at 18:01

Some pictures of the slow precipitation of Lead(II) Iodide by heating the solution to 95C so all the compound dissolves and slowly cooling down again.

Pictures of dry crystals in vial soon to follow.

IMGP1224.jpg - 269kBIMGP1253.jpg - 276kBIMGP1260.jpg - 264kB

blargish - 23-4-2015 at 18:17

Quote: Originally posted by TheAustralianScientist  
Some pictures of the slow precipitation of Lead(II) Iodide by heating the solution to 95C so all the compound dissolves and slowly cooling down again.

Pictures of dry crystals in vial soon to follow.


Just got some lead(II) nitrate and can't wait to try this reaction out! It looks awesome!

Volanschemia - 23-4-2015 at 18:33

Yes, it is a beautiful process to watch.
It looks like there is so much product there, but when dry all that barely fills up a 4mL vial.

I also love how the yellow precipitate dissolves to give a colourless solution.

[Edit] Typo.

[Edited on 24-4-2015 by TheAustralianScientist]

[Edited on 24-4-2015 by TheAustralianScientist]

mayko - 23-4-2015 at 18:44

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Nice! What method did you use to colorize them?


Part of it was using the Color Balance and Colorize tools. For the first, I used the clone tool to copy image info from other pictures (eg, a CD which had been microwaved, a butterly's wing under the microscope). I used the "color" setting, meaning that the patterns of saturation and value are preserved, but the color is carried over. For the second, I made a transparent layer over the main image which had the edges brought out and then motion blurred and colorized.

My crystals

Gleb - 29-4-2015 at 06:31



xebmMl7l71w.jpg - 24kBrD6vlxFHAoA.jpg - 25kBjPV05FT_BrY.jpg - 45kBTA-_UnXCjcg.jpg - 26kB8dJ1-GzUVBU.jpg - 30kBVAWopvhtwz4.jpg - 38kBVM9CFYu6Wio.jpg - 34kB

MrHomeScientist - 29-4-2015 at 07:58

Beautiful pictures, need details!

My crystals 2

Gleb - 29-4-2015 at 08:33



eKC_RzxxKwo.jpg - 34kBgUXGVqmZHRQ.jpg - 32kBt_SUjVLOHBk.jpg - 27kB5cbXOPMs0vY.jpg - 27kBmr1MkQrq1mA.jpg - 30kB

BobD1001 - 29-4-2015 at 20:02

Gleb, truly beautiful crystal specimens!

nezza - 30-4-2015 at 05:58

Small (0.5cm) crystals of Neodymium sulphate.

Neodymium sulphate.jpg - 232kB

DFliyerz - 30-4-2015 at 06:47

Gleb, those are beautiful. What's your secret?

Also Nezza, that is awesome! I've never seen neodymium salts before.

MrHomeScientist - 30-4-2015 at 07:03

There's several in "The Trouble with Neodymium..." thread! The ones I've produced all share the characteristic that they have different colors under different lighting (sunlight, CFL, etc.). Very cool!

Nezza, those are fantastic crystals. How big are they?

The Volatile Chemist - 30-4-2015 at 08:05

Indeed, Gleb, how'd you grow those? They appear to not have been suspended by string...?

Amos - 30-4-2015 at 08:09

Gleb, you can't leave us hanging like this! At least tell us what compound the crystals are made of!

Gleb - 30-4-2015 at 23:02

1 and 2 double copper-calcium acetate CaCu(CH3COO)4*2H2O
3 yellow blood salt K4[Fe(CN)6]*3H2O
4 nickel sulfate NiSO4*6H2O
5 red blood salt K3[Fe(CN)6]*3H2O
6 potassium dichromate K2Cr2O7
7 iron sulfate Fe(SO4)*7H2O
8 nickel sulfate NiSO4*7H2O (7H2O not 6H2O)
9 Rochelle salt KNaC4H4O6*4H2O
10 copper acetate Cu(CH3COO)2
11 potassium chromate K2CrO4
12 magnesium sulfate MgSO4*7H2O

The Volatile Chemist - 1-5-2015 at 08:12

Quote: Originally posted by Amos  
Gleb, you can't leave us hanging like this! At least tell us what compound the crystals are made of!

But Amos, from the looks of it, they weren't hanging... ;)

Detonationology - 6-5-2015 at 07:45

Here is some Bismuth metal I extracted from Pepto Bismol, mixed with a bit of methanol

Bismuth Flame 1.png - 68kB Bismuth Flame 2.png - 87kB Bismuth Flame 3.png - 56kB Bismuth Flame 4.png - 68kB

Zombie - 6-5-2015 at 08:05

This is the best thread on the site. Perhaps my favorite on the web.

You guys really know how to rock!

Loptr - 6-5-2015 at 08:56

Quote: Originally posted by Detonationology  
Here is some Bismuth metal I extracted from Pepto Bismol, mixed with a bit of methanol



How did you reduce the bismuth subsalicylate? Hydrochloric acid and aluminum, perhaps? I have read of people attempting to reduce it with carbon, but reported poor results.

Detonationology - 6-5-2015 at 09:04

Quote: Originally posted by Loptr  
Quote: Originally posted by Detonationology  
Here is some Bismuth metal I extracted from Pepto Bismol, mixed with a bit of methanol



How did you reduce the bismuth subsalicylate? Hydrochloric acid and aluminum, perhaps? I have read of people attempting to reduce it with carbon, but reported poor results.


That is exactly what I did. I then used some methanol to rinse the salicylic acid out

MrHomeScientist - 6-5-2015 at 12:38

I've tried that one and it yields Bi powder, which isn't very interesting to me so I tried melting it down to an ingot. That failed, and instead it oxidized to yellow bismuth trioxide! Too finely powdered, I guess.

Photoluminophor

Gleb - 10-5-2015 at 00:50

Combining photoluminophor, epoxy glue and bottles of brandy.

Yy6oUF1jn08.jpg - 17kBeTq7W4pOej8.jpg - 16kBaAZMLSWH54M.jpg - 19kB

alexleyenda - 16-5-2015 at 10:36

Photos from my internship:

What the guy beside me do :


reac rouge mottons.jpg - 65kB

What i do while he sacrifices virgins :

reac flash.jpg - 51kB

-_-'




[Edited on 16-5-2015 by alexleyenda]

Zombie - 16-5-2015 at 12:49

It's a tough call as to who has the better job...

blogfast25 - 16-5-2015 at 12:56

When fermenting berries in the lab, always strain the mash first!

Zombie - 16-5-2015 at 13:15


Meme+00085.jpg - 166kB

alexleyenda - 16-5-2015 at 13:27

^^By the way, the red stuff was a kind of Iron 2+ complex with a bidental triple cycle ligand, I forgot it's name, anyway it's not my project as I said :p

Texium (zts16) - 16-5-2015 at 13:49

Quote: Originally posted by MrHomeScientist  
I've tried that one and it yields Bi powder, which isn't very interesting to me so I tried melting it down to an ingot. That failed, and instead it oxidized to yellow bismuth trioxide! Too finely powdered, I guess.
Yeah, I had the same experience! Even when I tried to melt it under argon (using a wine preservation canister). Oh well. It isn't very pretty for the element collection but at least it still works for chemistry.

My collection (others)

Gleb - 17-5-2015 at 02:28

1. Mn(SO4)2
2. naphthalene
3. thiourea
4. Na2B4O7
5. K2SO4*NiSO4
6. Bi


qGPQPiFTnNY.jpg - 30kBTgjSUZdWNr4.jpg - 67kB2wQYPkYCBvA.jpg - 26kByziUe21_G4o.jpg - 39kBOYEnhzkJh0M.jpg - 25kBsyDrkGbqgdM.jpg - 62kB

smaerd - 17-5-2015 at 04:05

Nice flask there Alexleyenda. Love the column too. I learned a lot doing an internship like program hope you did too.

Wizzard - 17-5-2015 at 08:16

Gleb - Beautiful work, there!! I aspire to grow my own as well as yours. Can you tell me anything about the potassium sulfate and nickel sulfate crystal in your last picture?

Nizzo - Nice Nd sulfate crystals! How do you prevent yours from cracking? My medium sized ones (about that size) like to split along planes.

Brain&Force - 17-5-2015 at 21:38

<img src=http://i.imgur.com/vGCOVMu.jpg width=800>
<img src=http://i.imgur.com/cCwBiC6.jpg width=800>

The same holmium citrate solution, in tube lighting and CFL respectively.

Gleb - 18-5-2015 at 01:55

Wizzard, thank you!
I crystallized the stoichiometric amount of nickel sulfate solution and potassium:
NiSO4+K2SO4+6H2O=K2SO4*NiSO4*6H2O (blue-green crystals)

temperature=20 C
quite fine chemicals
isometric evaporation method

Brain&Force - 18-5-2015 at 20:05

<img src=http://i.imgur.com/By8k73e.jpg width=800>

Here's some of the holmium citrate solution I'm drying, under CFL light. The above pictures aren't very accurate, as there still was a bunch of particulate metal pieces that hadn't fully dissolved yet.

Here are the crystals that I've already made:

<img src=http://i.imgur.com/1gJSk0a.jpg width=800>

The Volatile Chemist - 26-5-2015 at 12:40

Cool! Very small, too bad. How much holmium do you own?

aga - 26-5-2015 at 12:48

And there was B&F saying he had no Lab ...

greenlight - 28-5-2015 at 07:19

Probably has already been done but rhodamine B in water:

[Edited on 28-5-2015 by greenlight]

20150528_232919.jpg - 3MB

[Edited on 28-5-2015 by greenlight]

20150528_233157.jpg - 3MB

PHILOU Zrealone - 28-5-2015 at 11:14

Quote: Originally posted by greenlight  
Probably has already been done but rhodamine B in water:

[Edited on 28-5-2015 by greenlight]



[Edited on 28-5-2015 by greenlight]

Looks similar to phenolphtalein cristals falling in NaOH solution :D

The Volatile Chemist - 31-5-2015 at 14:24

Yeah. But, heck, phenolphthalein crystals? I only've ever had solutions of it :/
Did you make the Rhodamine, or purchase it?

greenlight - 31-5-2015 at 18:57

@ volatile chemist;
I purchased the Rhodamine online.

greenlight - 3-6-2015 at 06:04

Again; may have already been posted but some nice coloured smoke compos:):

Screenshot_2015-06-03-17-22-24.png - 4.7MB Screenshot_2015-06-03-17-23-05.png - 4.1MB

[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]


Screenshot_2015-06-03-17-18-51.png - 4.1MB

[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]

[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]

Screenshot_2015-06-03-17-21-23.png - 3.7MB

[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]

DutchChemistryBox - 3-6-2015 at 09:52

Quote: Originally posted by greenlight  
Again; may have already been posted but some nice coloured smoke compos:):



[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]




[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]

[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]



[Edited on 3-6-2015 by greenlight]


Wow beautiful!

Can you tell us something about your compositions?

greenlight - 3-6-2015 at 19:20

They are 50:30:20 Powder dye/Potassium chlorate/Lactose powder.
50 grams each wrapped in paper and tightly taped

Top left = Blue dye Top right = Purple dye (Rhodamine B)
Middle = Yellow solvent dye
Bottom = 50:50 Blue/yellow

The Volatile Chemist - 4-6-2015 at 12:20

Cool, they look nice! Very opaque.

Texium (zts16) - 4-6-2015 at 14:04

Quote: Originally posted by greenlight  
Top left = Blue dye Top right = Purple dye (Rhodamine B)
Middle = Yellow solvent dye
Bottom = 50:50 Blue/yellow
Could you elaborate more on what the blue and yellow dyes consist of?

Volanschemia - 4-6-2015 at 16:24

Yes, please. I would like to know that as well. They look really nice!

alexleyenda - 4-6-2015 at 18:46

Quote: Originally posted by TheAustralianScientist  
Yes, please. I would like to know that as well. They look really nice!

I agree !

Today, in my internship, I made a zipper reaction, that is the result of ethylenediamine deprotonated by NaH, it becomes a nice purple !


11329668_575540119255398_533268627_n.jpg - 83kB11304469_575540042588739_157542487_n.jpg - 55kB

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