Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Pretty Pictures (2)

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greenlight - 4-6-2015 at 19:17

Very nice purple on the zipper reaction!
I purchased the powder dyes online and it did not specify on the listing or the packaging what type of exact dye they were.
I am fairly sure the yellow is solvent yellow 33 dye and the blue could be solvent blue dye 35 or 36.

DFliyerz - 5-6-2015 at 09:55

Some interesting crystals when I was decarboxylating salicylic acid to phenol, and an odd precipitate in my wash/waste bin (I think it may have been in part from the reaction of sucrose, sodium hydroxide, and copper sulfate, but the strange lumps on the bottom and lack of Rochelle's salt say otherwise.)

https://feen.us/k396.jpg
https://feen.us/4af1.jpg
(Too large to embed!)

[Edited on 6-5-2015 by DFliyerz]

Zephyr - 5-6-2015 at 14:36

Wow, interesting crystals!
Maybe the orangish red precipitate is copper (I) oxide?

The Volatile Chemist - 7-6-2015 at 13:39

Cool! The Zipper reaction looks great. Like to try it sometime.

aga - 7-6-2015 at 13:43

And so you shall TVC !

The Volatile Chemist - 7-6-2015 at 17:24

What? Oh, is it common in college or something? Definitely looking forward to AP Chem & AP Bio and Calc AB next year (Junior in HS).

Brain&Force - 8-6-2015 at 16:04

Back on track guys

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p lang="da" dir="ltr">Lanthanides, part 2: dysprosium and ytterbium <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/realtimechem?src=hash">#realtimechem</a> <a href="http://t.co/VyyFL8OIW7">pic.twitter.com/VyyFL8OIW7</a></p>&mdash; Brain&amp;Force (@brainandforce) <a href="https://twitter.com/brainandforce/status/608061459373948928">June 9, 2015</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

mayko - 8-6-2015 at 17:19

I made some iodoform recently, and recrystallized half of it from alcohol. The other half I tried to dry crude, and the base remaining on it appears to have caused it to decompose and release iodine - the filter paper and jar were stained brown. Now, though, there are these lovely formations growing on the lye I was using as a desicant!

LyeBerries.jpg - 2.9MB


Here's the conifer gall of a Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae . This fungus spends half its life cycle on apple trees, and the other half on junipers.



apple_cedar_rust.jpg - 2.4MB

DFliyerz - 9-6-2015 at 08:49

Quote: Originally posted by Pinkhippo11  
Wow, interesting crystals!
Maybe the orangish red precipitate is copper (I) oxide?


I was kind of thinking that too, but the color of the clumps and the chemicals in there don't really match.

PHILOU Zrealone - 10-6-2015 at 10:34

@Mayko,
Isn't iodoform yellow?

DraconicAcid - 10-6-2015 at 10:55

Quote: Originally posted by PHILOU Zrealone  
@Mayko,
Isn't iodoform yellow?


Yes, but if it's contaminated with iodine, it would probably have that icky brown colour.

mayko - 10-6-2015 at 11:23

Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
Quote: Originally posted by PHILOU Zrealone  
@Mayko,
Isn't iodoform yellow?


Yes, but if it's contaminated with iodine, it would probably have that icky brown colour.


Yes - and that's a picture of the NaOH I was using as a desiccant; sorry if I was unclear.

The Volatile Chemist - 10-6-2015 at 11:55

Nice photos. What method did you use to produce the iodoform? (And, just curious, what does iodoform smell like?)

pneumatician - 10-6-2015 at 17:49

extract from flowers.

flors.jpg - 82kB

PHILOU Zrealone - 12-6-2015 at 05:12

Quote: Originally posted by mayko  
Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
Quote: Originally posted by PHILOU Zrealone  
@Mayko,
Isn't iodoform yellow?


Yes, but if it's contaminated with iodine, it would probably have that icky brown colour.


Yes - and that's a picture of the NaOH I was using as a desiccant; sorry if I was unclear.

What was your process for CHI3?

I2 is soluble in brown in ethanol.
--> Was your recrystallization solvent orange-brown?

In a little chloroform I2 colours the solution in violet-purple.
That would prove some I2 formation.

If some of the NaOH has decomposed the iodoform or an intermediary compouns into I(-)...then NaI complexes iodine as brown-orange NaI3.

Alternatively ethanol may be oxydised by iodine into ethanal (what is subject to iodoform reaction)...ethanal will polymerize into orange-Brown tarry material upon exposure to strong base like lye (NaOH).

Brain&Force - 12-6-2015 at 12:49

<a title="By brainandforce (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons" href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AHolmium_shards.jpg"><img width="512" alt="Holmium shards" src="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/38/Holmium_shards.jpg/512px-Holmium_shards.jpg" width=800 /></a>

I uploaded my first image to Wikimedia Commons, these are holmium shards.

[Edited on 12.6.2015 by Brain&Force]

alexleyenda - 12-6-2015 at 14:30

Some pretty *disgusting* pictures, an extraction after a pdc oxydation (pyridinium dichromate). This reaction is such a pain in the @ to clean. And that is before I tried to wash it. It became worst when I started rubbing it with a brush, the crap stretched accross the glassware -_-



pdc1.jpg - 69kB pdc 2.jpg - 66kB

[Edited on 12-6-2015 by alexleyenda]

The Volatile Chemist - 13-6-2015 at 12:50

Nice! What procedure was used?
What's the gunk made of? Is it the product, or chromium junk?

plastics - 16-6-2015 at 01:46

Sodium salt of 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl-o-benzoic acid

Precursor to series of fluorescent dyes

Looks just like liquid gold

When dissolved in water gives deep olive-green solution

IMG_0423.JPG - 219kB

DutchChemistryBox - 16-6-2015 at 07:13

Quote: Originally posted by plastics  
Sodium salt of 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl-o-benzoic acid

Precursor to series of fluorescent dyes

Looks just like liquid gold

When dissolved in water gives deep olive-green solution


Interresting! What are you going to make?

pyro2525 - 17-6-2015 at 08:51

Manganese (II) Chloride, recrystallization test sample out of batch.
It is such a deliquescent bitch, redissolving whenever it rained. This came out of about a week in a desiccant bag.
The single crystals at the beginning were much prettier but I didn't want to risk taking it out.

mncl2_1.jpg - 414kB

mayko - 17-6-2015 at 19:22

Quote:

(And, just curious, what does iodoform smell like?)


A little like chloroform, but maybe more astringent. During preparation, there is a much stronger smell, a nauseating, cloying sweet smell, dissimilar to chloroform; this smell seems to remain with the aqueous layer.


Quote:

What was your process for CHI3?


I dissolved iodine in acetone and added sodium hydroxide solution.


Quote:

I2 is soluble in brown in ethanol.
--> Was your recrystallization solvent orange-brown?


It was a deep orange-yellow, but not so strong I suspected leftover iodine. The decomposition was striking: I put both samples into desiccators, the crude stuff as lumps, the pure stuff as crystals. They appeared identical colors. A day later, the crystals were fine; the lumps had turned a dark brown, almost black, which had stained the filter paper holding them.

Chloroform is reactive with base (I had vague memories of this being important when making it from bleach and acetone; the product is to be removed in a timely manner otherwise it will decay) but it isn't clear how a base would convert a haloform to a halogen.

Zephyr - 19-6-2015 at 16:03

I like those crystals pyro!
Here are a few of my own, these are vanillic acid being recrystallized:

Remnants:

96SVaFZ.jpg - 666kB

And the final drying crystals:

2k5Evc5.jpg - 1.5MB




The Volatile Chemist - 20-6-2015 at 18:46

"deliquescent bitch"
Lol, would make a BA band name, or a great pompous curse word to use on certain foul womenfolk :P

alexleyenda - 21-6-2015 at 20:14

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Nice! What procedure was used?
What's the gunk made of? Is it the product, or chromium junk?

The procedure could not be more simple, PDC with the molecule to oxidize in a solvent, the junk is probably chromium junk.

The Volatile Chemist - 22-6-2015 at 09:13

Quote: Originally posted by alexleyenda  
Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Nice! What procedure was used?
What's the gunk made of? Is it the product, or chromium junk?

The procedure could not be more simple, PDC with the molecule to oxidize in a solvent, the junk is probably chromium junk.

Was it 'for your education', or for fun?

alexleyenda - 22-6-2015 at 17:24

For my education and for research !

The Volatile Chemist - 22-6-2015 at 17:42

Nice. Where do you research/for who?

alexleyenda - 22-6-2015 at 19:07

At the university of montreal.

HeYBrO - 8-7-2015 at 21:10

CuCl2 which will be used for woelen's CsCuCl3 synthesis :)


IMG_3272.jpg - 2.2MB

The Volatile Chemist - 10-7-2015 at 10:38

Nice, that's a great pic! Post your prep of the second compound when you get a chance.

sasan - 11-7-2015 at 05:28

Tungsten trioxide powder.it is more yellow than I'd photographed.

[Edited on 11-7-2015 by sasan]

_20150711_174526.JPG - 914kB

sasan - 11-7-2015 at 05:44

And this is the picture of W3O8 green powder.another oxide of tungsten

_20150711_174623.JPG - 554kB

sasan - 11-7-2015 at 05:47

menthol crystals C10H20O
(1R,2S,5R)-2-Isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexanol

_20150711_174555.JPG - 440kB

sasan - 11-7-2015 at 05:50

Hexamine nickel chloride NiCl2.6 nh3


_20150711_174707.JPG - 483kBhexamine nickel chloride.jpg - 424kB

sasan - 11-7-2015 at 05:51

Copper ammonium sulfate crystal

_20150711_174416.JPG - 21kB

sasan - 11-7-2015 at 05:52

Manganese ammonium sulfate crystals.

_20150711_174450.JPG - 400kB

sasan - 11-7-2015 at 05:55

Potassium tetracyanonickelate(ll).

potassium tetracyanonickelate.jpg - 822kB

Starcruiser - 11-7-2015 at 06:24

My crowded little fumehood :)

Apparatus for making some ammonia soln. (NH4NO3 + KOH), improvised scrubbers in the background - some 30 years old milk bottles filled with water, suck-back traps in between (probably unnecessary - I`ve also provided some aquarium anti suck-back valves - these work like a charm (but I don`t rely on them if I were generating NO2 or something else more corrosive).

DSC_6601b_2.jpg - 4.9MB

[Edited on 11-7-2015 by Starcruiser]

aga - 11-7-2015 at 09:10

Looks great !

How do you get it so white and clean ?

Metacelsus - 11-7-2015 at 11:38

My fumehood was that clean right after I built it.

It would be very hard to get that way again (it would probably take a repainting).

Starcruiser - 11-7-2015 at 15:10

Quote: Originally posted by aga  
Looks great !

How do you get it so white and clean ?


Thanks aga.

It is rarely used (unfortunately !) and it is only about 1 year old. I work slow, prepare a lot before actually do any experiment (this setup, for example, took couple of weeks to put together).

Not so much work on the "fiery side" of the hobby, also trying to avoid as much as possible visible / smelly fumes (very busy apartment neighborhood, low profile is mandatory - afraid of "legal" interference).

And, yes, I am kind of obsessed with cleanliness (my wife too).


Volanschemia - 12-7-2015 at 16:51

In regard to a request by aga in this thread, here are some pictures pertaining to what I have done this month so far.
I thought I would post them here since most of them are quite pretty and that way I don't have to double post them.

1: My Bromine distillation setup (it was very cold that day, hence no condenser)
2: My yield of Bromine
3: Cobalt(II) Chloride (almost anhydrous)
4: Cobalt(II) Nitrate Hexahydrate
5: Cobalt(II) Nitrate Hexahydrate after crystallization in a petri dish
6: Praseodymium(III) Nitrate (hydrated)
7: Sodium Ruthenate(VI)
8: Top layer = 2-Ethylhexanol, Bottom layer = Aqueous Sodium Phthalate

Bromine Setup.jpg - 246kB Bromine.jpg - 167kB Cobalt(II) Chloride.jpg - 204kB Cobalt(II) Nitrate.jpg - 170kB Cobalt(II) Nitrate Crystals.jpg - 574kB Praseodymium(III) Nitrate.jpg - 199kB Sodium Ruthenate(VI).jpg - 208kB Saponified Phthalate.jpg - 144kB

HeYBrO - 12-7-2015 at 19:07

Damn those are nice pictures! Nice experimenting.

Texium (zts16) - 12-7-2015 at 20:16

Come on TAS, give diddi some credit too! :)

Volanschemia - 12-7-2015 at 20:24

Oh, alright then. diddi did a little bit. (and by that I mean he helped a lot. Thanks diddi!)

Gooferking Science - 14-7-2015 at 09:04

Mitotic skin cancer cells under my microscope at 1000x. You can clearly see the cells at different points in mitosis. The most incredible is a cell near the middle of the picture in anaphase. The spindle fibers are clearly visible! The yellowish tint near the edge is due to my camera not being perfectly in line with the microscope.

mitotic cancer cells forum.jpg - 4.8MB

Metacelsus - 14-7-2015 at 16:08

Cool! What stain is that? How is the sample prepared?

Gooferking Science - 15-7-2015 at 05:35

Quote: Originally posted by Cheddite Cheese  
Cool! What stain is that? How is the sample prepared?


It was an H&E stain. That stain is really good for viewing cancer cells since the basic haemotoxylin used binds to acidic DNA/RNA. This makes the extreme amounts of mitosis happening more visible and easier to identify.

The Volatile Chemist - 16-7-2015 at 12:51

You don't have skin cancer, do you?
Sasan and TAS, nice pictures! How's you make ethylhexanol? I'd like to!

Volanschemia - 16-7-2015 at 16:59

Thanks! The 2-Ethylhexanol was a byproduct of making Phthalic Acid from Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

Gooferking Science - 17-7-2015 at 10:14

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
You don't have skin cancer, do you?
Sasan and TAS, nice pictures! How's you make ethylhexanol? I'd like to!


No I don't. My father who is a dermatologist obtained this sample from a patient.

The Volatile Chemist - 21-7-2015 at 13:19

Quote: Originally posted by Gooferking Science  
Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
You don't have skin cancer, do you?
Sasan and TAS, nice pictures! How's you make ethylhexanol? I'd like to!


No I don't. My father who is a dermatologist obtained this sample from a patient.

Cool. What brand microscope do you have?

Texium (zts16) - 23-7-2015 at 16:25

Here's a couple pictures of sodium cuprioxalate, Na2[Cu(C2O4)2], which was made by crystallizing a solution of the complex formed by dissolving copper(II) oxalate in excess sodium oxalate solution. As you can see, it forms beautiful needle-like blue crystals, similar in color to copper nitrate, but much more delicate and non-hygroscopic.

IMG_0753.jpg - 1.8MB IMG_0752.jpg - 2.5MB

[Edited on 7-24-2015 by zts16]

j_sum1 - 23-7-2015 at 17:04

Wow! Cool pix zts16. I might have to try this.

Oscilllator - 26-7-2015 at 23:14

Nice one zts16. Did you use a cellphone camera for that second pic? It appears to be zoomed in quite far for a photo taken with a phone.

Texium (zts16) - 27-7-2015 at 08:09

Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
Nice one zts16. Did you use a cellphone camera for that second pic? It appears to be zoomed in quite far for a photo taken with a phone.
Thanks, and yes, I used my cellphone camera, but I have this little macro lense that fits on its camera so I can take decent close up pictures with it. It's really nice to have for getting good crystal pictures.

Ionic Chemist - 27-7-2015 at 09:27


I've been pretty busy with my first year of university and since I cant afford to buy some equipment for my personal experimenting I've been making stuff again. I'm not very sure if you'd classify them as pretty but I guess they have their own aesthetic going on.

The first picture is the conceptual design I'm going with for a stirrer/heating mantle, the glass part is from a broken sep funnel, the metal can is a sterno can and the plastic supports are from an old Cuisinart cup I found. The second picture is a vacuum aspirator made out of some old pen parts, a bunsen collar, some broken glassware and a few metal fittings and pieces. Oh! and just for fun two pictures of an old thermite volcano display I made a while back.

IMG_20150724_110707.jpg - 106kBIMG_20150724_110624.jpg - 115kB
207294_519061774813478_922648156_n.jpg - 267kB225252_519063338146655_1128709151_n.jpg - 111kB

Thank You......



The Volatile Chemist - 27-7-2015 at 12:01

Nice!
Zts16, have a copper compound collection? That compound would look nice in a storage container (Capped vial, ampoule, you know what I mean) if the crystals stayed intact!

Texium (zts16) - 27-7-2015 at 14:12

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Nice!
Zts16, have a copper compound collection? That compound would look nice in a storage container (Capped vial, ampoule, you know what I mean) if the crystals stayed intact!
Yes, I do, and I have already transferred it to a vial. Some of the crystals broke up a bit, but they remained intact for the most part.

The Volatile Chemist - 29-7-2015 at 09:23

Nice. Mine's small at the moment, but I have a very large amount of basic copper carbonate drying.

fluorescence - 1-8-2015 at 07:58

Just happened yesterday.
The cam doesn't pick it up very well but the liquid has the
same color as the surface of the precipitate a really
beautiful blue-green hue. In the test tube on the right is the
liquid layer seperated from the solid. As you can probably see
the color is different. The greenish hue is caused by the
orange to brown solid on the bottom of the beaker.

Nice...but I have no clue what it could be. Probably some
Copper Sulfate mixed with other Copper Compounds, dunno.
I was working on a new Cyanide Compound and prepared that
beaker full of KCN-solution. After I was finished I had quite a large
amount of it and wanted to neutralize it. Halfway trough I stopped
since it was to expensive to just neutralize and thought of
precipitating it with copper sulphate. That's when I got that solution.
I did it in a test tube, once with copper sulphate and on the other with some of the neutralizing agents I used. Only the second showed the beautiful blue-green color, the other one didn't.

I guess I'll have to try this without any Cyanide in it. Still it looks pretty nice and was quite a surprise to me.



Cooper blue.jpg - 189kB

The Volatile Chemist - 2-8-2015 at 15:10

Perhaps it's just a hydroxide or basic carbonate?
Pretty, regardless! Also, nice beaker! I'm rather fond of the tall, thin ones, though one always needs the short, wider ones for evaporation.

fluorescence - 3-8-2015 at 08:01

Yeah the reason I got that was kinda funny.

I was in this Chemical Shop and the shop owner just went to get me some Pyridine and
other Stuff I ordered when I saw that there were these beakers. I wasn't sure how much it fit
because of the hight so I thought I'd buy it. It's really usefull if you want to work with small scales
but need to have a high solvent coloumn. Usually I don't work with my Cyanides in these quantities but
in that specific case it was easier to handle the KCN solution in a higher beaker than in a lower one.

Does anyone know what that ampoule I'm holding at the right is called ? I got that from a pharmacy that
sold all their lab stuff. They are really usefull.

[Edited on 3-8-2015 by fluorescence]

Crowfjord - 3-8-2015 at 08:37



Quote:

Does anyone know what that ampoule I'm holding at the right is called ? I got that from a pharmacy that sold all their lab stuff. They are really usefull.


Looks like a small centrifuge tube.

[Edited on 3-8-2015 by Crowfjord]

gdflp - 3-8-2015 at 08:50

Quote: Originally posted by fluorescence  

Does anyone know what that ampoule I'm holding at the right is called ? I got that from a pharmacy that
sold all their lab stuff. They are really usefull.

It's a centrifuge tube with a glass stopper. Elemental Scientific sells them, they're quite expensive from them though IMO.

fluorescence - 3-8-2015 at 09:49

Cool I have two of them and a another one that is a test tube, a bit bigger also with glass stopper and graduated on the sides. Costed me like max. 5$ each, I think it was even cheeper. Two pharmacies closed last year and I spent around 100-120 $ buying their glass ware, ceramics, old bottles, especially those you used for Acids, that have another cap on them. They even offered me their fume hood but I didn't want to buy it.


j_sum1 - 3-8-2015 at 15:50

I haven't come across them before but a graduated tt with stopper seems like a splendid idea to me. I started looking and here is what I found!

glass centriguge tube.jpg - 24kB

Texium (zts16) - 3-8-2015 at 17:22

Well, that certainly ain't a pretty picture. I wonder if the shipping is better within the US, or if it's still bad and they're just trying to scam. Do you have a link?

fluorescence - 4-8-2015 at 05:34

If you ever want to react a salt with an acid make sure to add the
salt first, otherwise the test tube will be covered with liquid and the
salt will stick on it...something I didn't think of. I just saw that these
beautiful crystals formed. It's a continuous line along the wall and ends in a bigger crystal on the bottom :D.



Crystals.jpg - 206kB


Oh and here are the glass test tubes/centrifuge tubes whatsoever

glass.jpg - 65kB

[Edited on 4-8-2015 by fluorescence]

The Volatile Chemist - 9-8-2015 at 14:18

fluorescence, you seem to have a ton of luck with supplies! A chem shop near you AND a pharmacy closing????

fluorescence - 10-8-2015 at 12:47

Actually 2 Pharmacies closed. And I dont use that Shop too often.
I just ordered some Benzene thats something you wouldnt get in
that shop. But I guess I can get pretty much anything as long as I need it for my research.

And as for someone who knows quite many chemosts I usually get told when something is sold.

fluorescence - 11-8-2015 at 06:02

Part of my latest order came some Manganesechloride and Bismuth Nitrate. I knew I got the hydrate form but I didn't expect such large and really neat looking crystals. It's harder to dissolve but it looks really cool. Especially the Bismuth ones. Some are huge and quite transparent.

On the right I put some of the Chloride on about 250-300°C for around 10 minutes and then pulverized the result. I guess most of the water is out now.



12.jpg - 164kB

The Volatile Chemist - 12-8-2015 at 08:18

Nice pictures! Those crystals are really cool. When I ordered Ferric Ammonium Sulfate, I gt some really big crystals too.

j_sum1 - 16-8-2015 at 02:08

I finally get a turn at this. (I should have raided my wife's camera instead of using my antiquated phone. And I should have organised some light rather than trying to take them in near darkness.)

I had a go at making some sulfur crystals today. I was expecting rhombic and not the needles/feathers that I got. Still, rather interesting to look at.
For the interested, garden variety sulfur and xylene -- both from the hardware store.

2015-08-16 19.29.11.jpg - 1.2MB2015-08-16 19.29.30.jpg - 1.2MB2015-08-16 19.29.55.jpg - 1.2MB

diddi - 16-8-2015 at 02:33

most unexpected result j_sum. maybe different solvents will prove to make different crystals

HgDinis25 - 18-8-2015 at 13:39

So, I heard you like pretty pictures :cool:

https://hobbychemistry.wordpress.com/2015/08/18/returning/

PS: I was intending to post the photos here, but there are too many to resize, so I'll just direct you to the post with all of them.

The Volatile Chemist - 21-8-2015 at 12:23

Very nice! What is the first compound?

violet sin - 22-8-2015 at 02:33

found a nice book at the thrift store today :) only $2.50 for 159pg's of decent reading, I can't complain. I have found a few other great books there randomly from time to time.
080.jpg - 73kB 081.jpg - 79kB

Sulaiman - 22-8-2015 at 02:53

j_sum1

nice sulfur crystals !

how long did they take to grow ?


[Edited on 22-8-2015 by Sulaiman]

j_sum1 - 22-8-2015 at 03:49

Just as long as it took for the xylene to cool.
Not very long at all.

Texium (zts16) - 22-8-2015 at 07:13

Quote: Originally posted by violet sin  
found a nice book at the thrift store today :) only $2.50 for 159pg's of decent reading, I can't complain. I have found a few other great books there randomly from time to time.
Nice, that looks very useful! (although I'm sure the people at the store would not understand)

The Volatile Chemist - 22-8-2015 at 07:20

Time lapse would be cool for the growing of the sulfur.
Fine book! The only specialty book I've found at a half priced books of interest was a book having something to do with fields and molecules, I saw it a few years ago and didn't know what it was. It seems like it had to do with meshes (like in engineering programs) and the fields of electrons or charge that computer libraries like openbabel can calculate. But it was a while ago.

PHILOU Zrealone - 22-8-2015 at 10:31

Quote: Originally posted by violet sin  
found a nice book at the thrift store today :) only $2.50 for 159pg's of decent reading, I can't complain. I have found a few other great books there randomly from time to time.

Beware! Such buying can become addictive and compulsive.
Once started, you may find hard to stop :D

j_sum1 - 23-8-2015 at 02:34

Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Time lapse would be cool for the growing of the sulfur.

I might look into that.
Here's the latest effort -- silver crystals via displacement reaction. Nothing spectacular but a bit of a classic. I was pleased with the way that they look.

2015-08-23a.jpg - 375kB

violet sin - 23-8-2015 at 21:30


first batch of crystals after cooling, then after filtered
close up (2).jpg - 1017kB close up.jpg - 1.3MB

second batch of crystals from remaining sol, and cool pattern left from a thin film drying
slow cooling.jpg - 1017kB pattern.jpg - 1.3MB


Potassium ferrioxalate I finally got around to crystallizing, in the third pic you can see what happened when I let it cool slowly while trying for larger crystals. from the second wash after filtering. left in the pan on the hotplate with an aluminum lid for a slow cool. I got larger shapes, of small crystals...

also, notice to the left of the container bottom of first image, you can see a decidedly darker green spot. apple green to my eyes. this spot was set apart just lower left of center of the second image. I haven't had time to investigate yet, but it kinda looked like a larger crystal had formed in the mossy aggregate of small crystals.

while watching the solution cool, you could see larger thin sheets materialize rapidly. they looked to be kinda like a square ripped diagonally in a stair step pattern.

I often end up using 1$ coffee maker carafes for their large surface contact and cheap nature. gotta love the thrift store.

the first batch didn't turn out well, apparently hadn't read the part about sunlight and while in solution... bright 103'F day had me confused for a bit, but reading fixed that. pH paper, and the basement did the rest.





aga - 24-8-2015 at 12:41

New Life begins ...

natural ox heart 70 hours.jpg - 42kBshop ox heart 70 hours 2.jpg - 21kBshop ox heart 70 hours.jpg - 25kBbasil coco 70 hours bag n paper.jpg - 43kB

PHILOU Zrealone - 25-8-2015 at 05:05

Quote: Originally posted by aga  
New Life begins ...

Beautifull babies...
May I ask: seeds or spores of what?

Potassium nitrate crystals

Starcruiser - 25-8-2015 at 10:30

Potassium nitrate crystals (macro photography)

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aga - 25-8-2015 at 11:45

Quote: Originally posted by PHILOU Zrealone  
May I ask: seeds or spores of what?

3 of Ox Heart tomato, one of basil (the blurry one).

70 hours from starting to try to germinate them, and not a drop of GA-3 in sight :)

aga - 25-8-2015 at 11:48

Nice crystals Starcruiser.

They look great in black and white.

People forget that we see in B/W much better than in colour.

Starcruiser - 25-8-2015 at 12:30

Thank you, Aga.

Some more KNO3:

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aga - 25-8-2015 at 12:35

I can see this is a Fetish.

Stop before you go blind.

Edit :

Has anyone tried making a saturated solution, then dilute it just a tiny bit, then slowly dripped it from a height to make a stalagmite ?

It might work with KNO3, sodium acetate sounds easier.

[Edited on 25-8-2015 by aga]

Starcruiser - 25-8-2015 at 13:16

Quote: Originally posted by aga  
I can see this is a Fetish.

Stop before you go blind.



It is something I wanted to do for a long time.

Good advice, though... will keep that in mind at least `till my next batch of nice crystals :)

aga - 25-8-2015 at 13:33

OK. The Race is On.

aga vs Starcruiser in the Stalagmite Challenge !
(dac 5.38)

3 days to produce a stalagmite of any substance of your choice, provided that it starts as a Flat plate and a solvated liquid.

3, 2, 1, Go !

I'm thinking sodium acetate and calculating the evaporation over 1 metre.

Splashes ! Damn. Need a Tall bucket or something.

Camroc37 - 25-8-2015 at 15:15

Quote: Originally posted by Gooferking Science  



Half neutralized bromine water solution gives this beautiful color gradation effect.

[Edited on 11-10-2013 by Gooferking Science]

Hey, whats up?

HeYBrO - 28-8-2015 at 02:05

Quote: Originally posted by Camroc37  
Quote: Originally posted by Gooferking Science  



Half neutralized bromine water solution gives this beautiful color gradation effect.

[Edited on 11-10-2013 by Gooferking Science]

Hey, whats up?


Please use the U2U message system if you wish to converse with others.

fluorescence - 28-8-2015 at 04:25

I tried that sulfur crystalls with Benzene today.
Heated about 5 ml of Benzene with 2 Spatulas of Sulfur
to it's boiling point, had it boil for about 5 minutes and
then wrapped aluminium foil around the test tube.
That's what I got.



Sulfur Benzene.jpg - 186kB


Quite nice chunks for the fact that I started with a powder
it looks quite cool :D

[Edited on 28-8-2015 by fluorescence]

Hegi - 28-8-2015 at 13:40

Quote: Originally posted by fluorescence  
I tried that sulfur crystalls with Benzene today.
Heated about 5 ml of Benzene with 2 Spatulas of Sulfur
to it's boiling point, had it boil for about 5 minutes and
then wrapped aluminium foil around the test tube.
That's what I got.

Quite nice chunks for the fact that I started with a powder
it looks quite cool :D

[Edited on 28-8-2015 by fluorescence]


try to go with more solvent in a 50 cc flask, add a small piece of random rock as a seed rock ( :D ) and cool it down slowly (I used dewar´s botttle)

nitro-genes - 28-8-2015 at 16:43

Thin, plate like crystals of 4-amino 2,6-dinitrophenol, resembling a pure gold pigment powder when dry. Recrystallized from ethanol/water, the wet, thin plates orient themselves as one reflective gold mirror, truly one of the most beautiful compounds I made so far. :)

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