Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Name that rock

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Morgan - 23-1-2014 at 13:05

I was looking at some old rocks and found this one with kind of a gray bubble surface on top and was just wondering what it might be. It's kind of hard to make it out so I'm posting some other rock with kind of the same bubble appearance in quartz I guess.


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[Edited on 24-1-2014 by Morgan]

UnintentionalChaos - 23-1-2014 at 13:15

That growth style is known as "botryoidal" The pinkish one, to my untrained eye might be smithsonite (ZnCO3). Might want to look into hematite and malachite as well, which commonly form this structure.

[Edited on 1-23-14 by UnintentionalChaos]

phlogiston - 23-1-2014 at 13:25

A psilomelane?


Romanechite:


hollandite:


Where dit it come from?

bfesser - 23-1-2014 at 13:26

I'm fairly certain it's (first photo) not hematite or malachite. My best guess is botryoidal <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorapatite" target="_blank">fluorapatite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> (New York?). It's difficult to identify any rock or mineral from photos alone.

[edit] On re-examination of the photos; I wouldn't rule out hematite. See this topic for ideas on identification techniques: <strong><a href="viewthread.php?tid=25943">Presence of traces iron oxide minerals in limestone</a></strong>

[Edited on 23.1.14 by bfesser]

Morgan - 23-1-2014 at 14:24

Thanks for the replies. I guess the word I was looking for was
botryoidal. The rocks were some old mildly curious "outdoor" rocks my Dad had collected. He had about a wheel barrel full of them. They may have come from Oregon, we used to live there.
I once visited the Smithsonian and looked at all of the mineral collection. Neat stuff those rocks. Universities too have some good displays.

IrC - 23-1-2014 at 15:26

004.JPG looks very similar to poor quality common milky opal, Although I'm not a mineralogist and am unsure why in one rock some quartz would be so hydrated compared to the substrate. Also has some similarity in appearance to Chalcedony except that would be unusual to be with typical quartz. No my mind keeps going back to maybe an opal that had near zero trace impurities to add color when it was forming.

bfesser - 23-1-2014 at 15:44

<strong>IrC</strong>, I agree that the second specimen does look a lot like <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalcedony" target="_blank">chalcedony</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. In fact, after finishing my previous reply, I went through my mineral cabinet drawers, and found a similar looking specimen of fluorescent chalcedony with calcite. I also found a specimen of botryoidal <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hematite" target="_blank">hematite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> that looks similar to the rock in the first photo&mdash;leading me to retract my first statement. I'll try to take some photos of my specimens tomorrow morning; if for no other purpose than aesthetic gratification. For the hell of it, I'll try to take some <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664#photos">fluorescence/phosphorescence photos</a> tonight.

[Edited on 1.2.14 by bfesser]

Zephyr - 23-1-2014 at 21:29

My father is a geologist and has a large collection of rare rocks, can anyone guess what these are?










Tdep - 23-1-2014 at 21:46

The last one I believe is rhodonite

The first one may be gypsum which is pretty easy to tell from the softness of it (you can basically scratch it with a fingernail)

Zephyr - 23-1-2014 at 21:53

Yes, the first one is orange gypsum, found in North Africa. That one was the easiest though, the last one is not rhodonite.

Tdep - 23-1-2014 at 22:48

It's not rhodochrosite then? It doesn't look quite pink enough to be but it's worth a guess...

phlogiston - 24-1-2014 at 02:01

Then fluorite perhaps? I once found some fluorite that looks similar.

[Edited on 24-1-2014 by phlogiston]

bfesser - 24-1-2014 at 05:44

Morgan, try a streak test on your unknown botryoidal mineral. All you need is a piece of unglazed porcelain&mdash;sometimes the back of a tile is suitable. If the <a href="http://flic.kr/p/jCquG6" target="_blank">streak is brick red</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />, it's likely hematite.
Quote: Originally posted by Pinkhippo11  
My father is a geologist and has a large collection of rare rocks, can anyone guess what these are?
Pinkhippo11, you can't seriously expect us to identify those based on some poor quality low-resolution photos alone. Regardless, I'll take a stab at the second and fourth; are they pumice and <a href="http://www.mindat.org/min-972.html" target="_blank">charoite</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />? (By the way, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsum" target="_blank">gypsum</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> is a mineral, not a rock.)

<hr width="80%" />
<a id="photos"></a>Here are the photos I promised&mdash;labeled, because I don't like guessing games:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112705226/" title="Chalcedony &amp; Calcite by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2880/12112705226_b1d52b9b84_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Chalcedony &amp; Calcite"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112047055/" title="Chalcedony &amp; Calcite Fluorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5524/12112047055_22cd41ff53_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Chalcedony &amp; Calcite Fluorescence"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Chalcedony & Calcite</td><td align="center">254 nm Fluorescence</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112812626/" title="Opal by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2888/12112812626_ae80bf9e1b_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Opal"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112457473/" title="Opal Fluorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7310/12112457473_8b768f03e3_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Opal Fluorescence"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Dendritic Opal</td><td align="center">254 nm Fluorescence</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112209865/" title="Opal by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7302/12112209865_86d7af366a_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Opal"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112888746/" title="Hematite, botryoidal by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5472/12112888746_7b27b3c74c_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Hematite, botryoidal"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Dendritic Opal</td><td align="center">Botryoidal Hematite</td></tr></table>

While I had the UV lamp and camera out:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112657796/" title="Zircon by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5520/12112657796_e041cc1709_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Zircon"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112296573/" title="Zircon Fluorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2817/12112296573_ebe75d1b99_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Zircon Fluorescence"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Zircon</td><td align="center">254 nm Fluorescence</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112370263/" title="Calcite/Dolostone by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3695/12112370263_2b5a7acfa1_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Calcite/Dolostone"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112460364/" title="Calcite/Dolostone Fluorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3712/12112460364_d5191f04f3_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Calcite/Dolostone Fluorescence"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Dolostone & Calcite</td><td align="center">254 nm Fluorescence</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112410943/" title="Calcite by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5499/12112410943_024587a17c_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Calcite"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112406893/" title="Calcite Fluorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5533/12112406893_1ea7e30233_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Calcite Fluorescence"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112106525/" title="Calcite Phosphorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3746/12112106525_c56a839996_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Calcite Phosphorescence"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Calcite</td><td align="center">254 nm Fluorescence</td><td align="center">Phosphorescence</td></tr></table>
My favorites:<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112512574/" title="Calcite Vug Fluorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3717/12112512574_affa55cb26_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Calcite Vug Fluorescence"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12112772296/" title="Calcite Vug Phosphorescence by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5540/12112772296_97bfdd9e16_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Calcite Vug Phosphorescence"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center"><a href="viewthread.php?tid=14644&page=40#pid297682">Calcite</a> 254 nm Fluorescence</td><td align="center">Phosphorescence</td></tr></table>

[Edited on 1.2.14 by bfesser]

Random - 24-1-2014 at 16:46

Guys how do you identify rocks? Is there some kind of protocol for that? I never understood how one could do it so easily if there are so many similar ones and each rock actually looks even more similar to my untrained eye.

violet sin - 24-1-2014 at 18:22

morgan:
#2 looks like hyalite opal

pinkhippo11:
#2 looks to be small grain lepidolite, but too blurry to tell. I have a single crystal 2" and a few pieces of small grain like packed lilac colored glitter

#3 maybe barite?

bfesser: nice pics, love the zircon

I have some mineral specimens to add here, just edit them in this post here in a bit. botryoidal hyalite opal, botryoidal jade, bot- fire agate to start with

blargish - 24-1-2014 at 19:34

On the topic of botryoidal formations, here are a couple from my collection.

Hemimorphite (blue), Malachite/Azurite (green/royal blue)

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Zephyr - 24-1-2014 at 20:45

Alright, the pictures were a bit blurry so I'll just tell you what the rocks were.
In order from first to last:
-Gypsum.
-Tremolite, manganese gives it its color.
-Dolomite Crystal, these have rare curved faces.
-Fuchsite, a chromium rich green mica, the pink is quarts.

violet sin - 25-1-2014 at 00:44

hyalite opal .......................................fire agate
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jade................................................... lepidolite in front of a lamp
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the hyalite opal flouresces but the camera I was using sucks, so it didn't show any of the color. UV won out :( it is about 1/10th the brightness of uranium glass I have( good stuff, quite bright)

BromicAcid - 25-1-2014 at 06:49

Quote: Originally posted by Random  
Guys how do you identify rocks? Is there some kind of protocol for that? I never understood how one could do it so easily if there are so many similar ones and each rock actually looks even more similar to my untrained eye.


From my limited training there is more to it than just looking at the rock. For example, look at the wiki article on zircon. Look at all the information listed under identification. Streak test is pretty common (mentioned above) but when you are out in the field you use what is obvious (color, crystal structure) to narrow it down then you start to examine other features such as cleavage, hardness, etc. to peg it to a specific mineral. I don't think there is any sort of master chart with all the different rocks/minerals on it where you can start from the top and work your way down. Afterall, there are soooooo many minerals out there, some only found in one or two places in the world or only found once for a single sample. It's interesting but it's a huge field in itself. Then again I am sure a lot of geologist nowadays just send out the rock for elemental analysis though they might have a general idea of what it is beforehand.

bfesser - 25-1-2014 at 07:06

As of 10/2013, there were 4859 <a href="http://www.ima-mineralogy.org/" target="_blank">International Mineralogical Association (IMA)</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> listed mineral species. This isn't for identification, but it's a 'master chart'.

Attachment: IMA_Master_List_(2013-10).pdf (1.5MB)
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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 12:23

This rock looks like it fractured, shifted, and then cemented itself back together. I don't know what formed it that way or what it's called. Or maybe it grew and crowded into this arrangement?

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[Edited on 26-1-2014 by Morgan]

Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 12:40

This is some crumbly rock I have no idea about.


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elementcollector1 - 26-1-2014 at 12:42

Looks like paint on the outside to me...

Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 13:05

More of my inherited outdoor rocks, I made a sharp flat shard in a shiny solid black obsidian that fits in the palm of my hand. The very thin cutting edge is translucent brown if held up to the light while the rest opaque glassy black. I just took a hunk and hit it with a hammer. It's neat how you can fit the strange smooth surfaces back together if you split one in half.
I like these other obsidian pieces better though, the few pinkish speckles here and there might be pretty if the piece were split open. The other kind of reminds me of a wood grain.
I find the shapes of rocks almost as interesting as what they are made of sometimes.




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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 13:13

Quote: Originally posted by elementcollector1  
Looks like paint on the outside to me...


Now that you mention it, it does look like it could be some man-made paint or plastic bits that were cemented with sediments. There's also some yellow-green algae growing on it too.

Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 17:07

Some purple rocks.


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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 17:16

Some kind of green rock. I don't know what it is.


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[Edited on 27-1-2014 by Morgan]

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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 17:38

Some curvy things. They're quite heavy. You can see a porousness to them.


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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 17:44

Kind of a clay sandstone material?



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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 17:57

I'm not sure what to call this. It appears to be a fine clay-like layering but hard now with a slight ring to it if you tap the thin pieces.

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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 18:14

I wonder where this stuff comes from? You see it all over as round polished gift shop stuff. Still it's kind of nice. I would like to explore the Burgess Shale Formation I think.


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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 18:30

Looks like petrified wood. They're very heavy.


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[Edited on 27-1-2014 by Morgan]

blargish - 26-1-2014 at 18:47

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
Some kind of green rock. I don't know what it is.




[Edited on 27-1-2014 by Morgan]


That looks like aventurine. It's a type of quartz

Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 18:58

More of my outdoor rocks, a hodgepodge of commoners I suppose. The tiger eye dabbed with a little water for picture day. I don't know the names of the picture 48 group or what they may be.

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Morgan - 26-1-2014 at 19:34

This is a simple little rock or mineral but not much in the way of clues other than if you wet it, you can sort of see into it somewhat, or not opaque if you polished it. But it's a very dark green, that's about it. It would be glassy if polished, no grains in it.

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elementcollector1 - 26-1-2014 at 19:51

Jade? More aventurine? Green quartz?

Zephyr - 26-1-2014 at 20:11

Morgan, I think the one that looks like it has been fractured or shifted is dolomite, is has slightly rounded crystal faces. Could the one with orange stripes be banded iron?
Here is the Wikipedia on dolomite. An easy way to test for it is simply to drop some dilute HCl on it, if no gas is evolved it could be dolomite.

Zephyr - 26-1-2014 at 20:12

Also the "curvy things" look like petrified wood...

blargish - 26-1-2014 at 23:57

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
This is a simple little rock or mineral but not much in the way of clues other than if you wet it, you can sort of see into it somewhat, or not opaque if you polished it. But it's a very dark green, that's about it. It would be glassy if polished, no grains in it.


Mtorolite? It's a type of chalcedony; yours seems too dark though. Actually, now that I think of it, your previous green mineral might be mtorolite. The furthest right in the group of three rocks you showed looks like some sort of chalcedony as well.

Morgan - 27-1-2014 at 11:55

I wonder what causes this crinkle effect, as if the surfaces were melted and pressed against something?

[Edited on 27-1-2014 by Morgan]

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Morgan - 27-1-2014 at 12:13

A smooth rock of some sort.


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Morgan - 27-1-2014 at 12:41

The camera didn't capture the sheen this slate-like rock had. It also had more of a green tint. I couldn't get the angle right in the sunlight.

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bfesser - 27-1-2014 at 12:52

Looks like a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garnet" target="_blank"">garnet</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllite" target="_blank">phyllite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. Can you post a photo taken through a magnifier of one of the garnets?

Here's an example of an <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almandine" target="_blank">almandine</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staurolite" target="_blank">staurolite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schist" target="_blank">schist</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> for comparison:
<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/11989849993/" title="Almandine Staurolite Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3727/11989849993_fd01a1b7ac_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Almandine Staurolite Schist"></a> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/11989546955/" title="Almandine Staurolite Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7355/11989546955_d085e9851a_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Almandine Staurolite Schist"></a>

[Edited on 27.1.14 by bfesser]

Morgan - 27-1-2014 at 13:21

I was thinking it was garnet too remembering another rock I have and a previous post of yours of a rock face loaded with them. Funny I didn't notice the flecks until I saw my own photo of them, but that characteristic stands out once you are used to seeing it. I can photograph it using my magnifying lens yes, I can't tell you how many times I wished I had a macro lens.

[Edited on 27-1-2014 by Morgan]

blargish - 28-1-2014 at 15:45

Here is a cool metamorphic rock studded with garnet porphyroblasts that I found up at my cottage during the summer. I'm not exactly sure whether the host rock would be classed as a gneiss or a granulite, although I think that it seems more like a granulite.

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blargish - 28-1-2014 at 16:15

Here are a few really cool features that I found up at my friend's place near Parry Sound during the summer.

The first image is of a highly metamorphosed, folded, mafic dike (amphibolite) that cuts through some sort of felsic granulite.

The second image, from the same area, shows at least four different geological processes: (this is my opinion)

1. The creation of the felsic granulite
2. The intrusion of a mafic dike, presumably diabase or gabbro at that point in time (middle left to top right)
3. The metamorphosis of said dike into amphibolite
4. Finally, the relatively more recent intrusion of a pegmatite dyke (across the center)

The third image is another example of the second (the wide amphibolite dike curves from bottom right to top left; the pegmatite dike cuts across the center dipping slightly to the left)

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Pathos - 29-1-2014 at 13:23

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
I wonder what causes this crinkle effect, as if the surfaces were melted and pressed against something?

[Edited on 27-1-2014 by Morgan]


Left one might be Amber? If so that's a nice big natural chunk of it!

I think Oregon is a good bet for the source of most of these. I had a friend that carted home an essentially identical collection to yours while hiking around south-central WA. I helped him clean & organize them later.

Cleaning sometimes involved a fun trick I found online somewhere:
1: Drop your specimen(s) into an HCl bath
2: Tear a sheet of aluminum foil into strips
3: Add foil strips to HCl bath. Observe vigorous redox rxn.
4: Fish out your specimens & observe what remains

Was pretty interesting to see what survived. Worked great for cleaning dirt or rock off of crystal formations. But sometimes destroyed the whole specimen :(

bfesser - 29-1-2014 at 17:02

I too thought it might be <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber" target="_blank">amber</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />, but I don't know what rough amber looks like&mdash;I've never seen it myself.

blargish, great outcrop photos. Thanks for sharing.
Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
I was thinking it was garnet too remembering another rock I have and a previous post of yours of a rock face loaded with them.
Morgan, I don't recall ever posting such a photo (before this thread). Any chance you could link to it?

I tried taking photos of some of my mica schist specimens a few days ago, but my camera battery died before I got up to the good specimens from the <a href="http://www.mindat.org/loc-22519.html" target="_blank">Black Hills, SD</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />. I also lament that I don't have a proper macro lens (or a DSLR, for that matter). Regardless, here are a few related specimens I managed to photograph:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12179197094/" title="Staurolite Almandine Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3698/12179197094_33ee170264_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Staurolite Almandine Schist"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12179030033/" title="Staurolite Almandine Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3793/12179030033_db9435a164_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Staurolite Almandine Schist"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Staurolite Almandine Schist<br />(Specimen 1)</td><td align="center">Staurolite Almandine Schist<br />(Specimen 1)</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12179227964/" title="Almandine Staurolite Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7399/12179227964_cdb2a5ac77_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Almandine Staurolite Schist"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12179259274/" title="Staurolite Twin in Almandine Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7291/12179259274_c927716420_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Staurolite Twin in Almandine Schist"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Almandine Staurolite Schist<br />(Specimen 2)</td><td align="center">Staurolite Twin in Almandine Schist<br />(Specimen 2)</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12178837195/" title="Staurolite Twin by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3773/12178837195_8a4969005e_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Staurolite Twin"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12179088843/" title="Almandine Dodecahedra by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2810/12179088843_6dbfec193d_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Almandine Dodecahedra"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Staurolite Twin</td><td align="center">Almandine Dodecahedra</td></tr></table>

And just because I feel like it:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12178491735/" title="Amethyst by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3824/12178491735_8ba2203a56_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Amethyst"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/11989798373/" title="Outcrop by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5539/11989798373_1ee0d177a7_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Outcrop"></a></td></tr></table>

chemrox - 29-1-2014 at 17:50

I just started looking at these. The first were the mineral fluorite... good examples too... typical colors are white, violet-purple and green. The purple kind is easily confused with amethyst until you scratch it. The curvy looking things are castings.. desert environment. I'll read up on the gensis and get back to you.

Morgan - 29-1-2014 at 19:08

bfessor I must have spaced out thinking you posted some previous garnet pictures. The amber looking rock is too heavy to be amber but the crinkle effect and color does look like it.
I was looking at/enlarging the photo of the big, smooth, slate blue rock again and the curved lines around the ends almost make it look like a petrified wood.

Some other rocks, last of the pile. And so concludes this collection of misfit rocks, rocks that weren't showy enough to be indoors. Individually each one didn't have much appeal to me, but now that I look at them collectively, they do.

Thanks again to all for all the interesting comments.


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[Edited on 30-1-2014 by Morgan]

bfesser - 29-1-2014 at 19:59

Again, the first one looks like chalcedony. The ones in the sixth photo appear to be river-worn granite <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Particle_size_(grain_size)" target="_blank">cobbles and pebbles</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. Are strong magnets attracted to any of the others?

If it's alright, I'd like to keep this topic going as a sort of 'geology pretty pictures' thread. Here is a composite photo I made of the bend in the St. Croix river through <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_Park" target="_blank">Interstate Park</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />&mdash;the view is from 'Angle Rock' on the inside (MN) of the sharp bend caused by the river eroding down through a fault in the basalt (<a href="http://aerialgeologist.blogspot.com/2013_07_01_archive.html" target="_blank">ref.</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />;):

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/11988098314/" title="St. Croix River, Interstate Park, MN by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5530/11988098314_a41ff2a934_c.jpg" width="800" height="176" alt="St. Croix River, Interstate Park, MN"></a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" valign="top" />

(Yes, I'm aware of the slight compositing error in the trees near the right of the photo. I was unable to correct it.)

Attachment: interstate_geology.pdf (716kB)
This file has been downloaded 328 times

[Edited on 30.1.14 by bfesser]

blargish - 30-1-2014 at 07:21

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  

Some other rocks, last of the pile. And so concludes this collection of misfit rocks, rocks that weren't showy enough to be indoors. Individually each one didn't have much appeal to me, but now that I look at them collectively, they do.

Thanks again to all for all the interesting comments.

[Edited on 30-1-2014 by Morgan]


In the second picture, those big shiny plates look like muscovite. Is that some sort of muscovite schist?

Morgan - 30-1-2014 at 09:49

It could be muscovite, I'm not one to ask as I know very little. I could say it looks like mica and that's about it.

bfessor some time ago I put some little square neodymium magnets on the rocks to test them and I was surprised how many at least stuck well enough to hold on without falling off. That one on the end in the last post I made is of course highly attracted to a magnet.
By all means feel free to kept the thread going. I wish I could find new rocks but living along the gulf coast there's a lot of sand and clay. I was watch PBS though and not too far from here they mined a small area for a bit of iron ore containing rocks.
When I lived here long ago as a boy there were these cliffs that had really pretty colored clays, I remember digging out muddy purples, yellow, and red all right next to each to each other, like melted plastic. It was soft and malleable. I also liked finding the lighter pumice rocks on the railroad tracks, we'd put them in the water to see which ones float.

Here's some ringing rocks you might be able to whittle a unique tuning fork out of.
Ringing Rocks Park Pottstown, Pennsylvania
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBfrLoBpsIQ

I like the sound sand can make. There're several good booming sand clips.
The song of the dunes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yFaMsUawi4
Booming Sands
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XF6kGDLcVE


[Edited on 30-1-2014 by Morgan]

Pathos - 30-1-2014 at 10:37

Quote:
The amber looking rock is too heavy to be amber but the crinkle effect and color does look like it.


Am still thinkin' its amber...A chunk of natural amber that size wouldn't feel too much different from a rock of the same size. It can be surprisingly heavy. The appearance is spot on too: it usually looks kinda like lava, forming globs & puddles as it flows...but also gets the crinkled effect from all the pine needles and other crud that it encounters from being so damned sticky all the time. hehhe...
I opened the picture in a pic editor and tried to mess around with the brightness/contrast/colors/etc a little bit, attached below. May have gone a smidge too far into the 'reds'. Whatever the case, its a very cool piece. I'd love to see more pics from different angles at some point - am interested in the slightly darker 'bulbs' on right&left corners, and maybe back corner too? It's too hard to say for sure from the one pic...

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My first thought was mica or vermiculite for the flaky stuff too. It does look pretty identical to muscovite I've seen before but the placement/occurence of it in that speciment are way more consistent with mica I've seen (in my very limited experience).

I'm glad you expanded the thread bfesser! Now I have excuse to dig out all sorts of goodies!:D I've got a few Aquamarines with cool looking muscovite all over them that would pertain to this particular discussion. Those will be first, & then maybe a ton of natural pyrite samples I've got in a cigar box somewhere a bit later.

blargish - 30-1-2014 at 12:10

Quote: Originally posted by Pathos  



My first thought was mica or vermiculite for the flaky stuff too. It does look pretty identical to muscovite I've seen before but the placement/occurence of it in that speciment are way more consistent with mica I've seen (in my very limited experience).



I always thought that muscovite was a type of mica?

I look forward to seeing the pics of your aquamarines!

Pathos - 30-1-2014 at 13:19

Yeah I suppose you're right...I guess I've always thought of 'mica' as being sort of a loosely defined term for any rocks/minerals that behave like, well, the other 'micas'.

Anyways I owe you a 'Thanks!' since your comment spurred me to actually look it up and learn something! From Wikipedia:

Quote:

---Trioctahedral micas
--Common micas:
Biotite
Lepidolite
Muscovite
Phlogopite
Zinnwaldite
Brittle micas:
- Clintonite
---Interlayer deficient micas
Very fine-grained micas, which typically show more variation in ion and water content, are informally termed "clay micas". They include:
- Hydro-muscovite with H3O+ along with K in the X site;
- Illite with a K deficiency in the X site and correspondingly more - Si in the Z site;
- Phengite with Mg or Fe2+ substituting for Al in the Y site and a corresponding increase in Si in the Z site.


Regarding the aquamarines, I just realized that I no longer have a real/quality camera here. Gonna have to choose between just a couple megapixels from my phone or couple megapixels from my kindle...No big deal though should still be able to see some acceptable level of detail..

Morgan - 30-1-2014 at 16:50

Pathos I will fiddle with the amber colored rock and take another photo this weekend. What about that dirty white crinkled rock I posted, would a white tree sap mineralize or if anyone has a guess?
I came across these amber tidbits if anyone can add to it or point out any flaws.
http://www.rockhounds.com/rockshop/trueamber.shtml

I'll post some other kinds of old rocks I found, some that I forgot about, mostly ones that I was seeing if magnets would stick to them.

bfesser - 30-1-2014 at 19:49

<em>Disclaimer: you simply can't identify a mineral from a photo alone. That being said...</em>

Morgan, <a href="files.php?pid=317177&aid=29199">this one</a> looks like it could be chalcedony. Rather than continuing to post photos and go by visual evidence alone, perhaps you should look into learning more about <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mineral_tests" target="_blank">mineral properties and identification tests</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />&mdash;it would help to make this a more scientific and valuable thread.
Quote: Originally posted by Pinkhippo11  
Could the one with orange stripes be banded iron?
It's unclear which <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664&page=2#pid316792">rocks you're referring to</a>; regardless, neither of them are <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banded_iron_formation" target="_blank">banded iron formation</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. I've collected two specimens of banded iron formation from two different locations in MN (see photos below). Morgan's specimens look more like <a href="viewthread.php?tid=25943#pid297416">iron-stained sandstone</a>, to me.

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12227172176/" title="Banded Iron Formation by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2818/12227172176_dbcd968718_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Banded Iron Formation"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12227261286/" title="Banded Iron Formation by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3819/12227261286_43b49af723_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Banded Iron Formation"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226865863/" title="Banded Iron Formation by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5478/12226865863_28fb00266c_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Banded Iron Formation"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Banded Fe Formation<br />(Specimen 1)</td><td align="center">with magnet<br />(Specimen 1)</td><td align="center">banding detail<br />(Specimen 1)</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226674583/" title="Banded Iron Formation by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5481/12226674583_e121371707_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Banded Iron Formation"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12227070916/" title="Banded Iron Formation by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3771/12227070916_58748d153e_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Banded Iron Formation"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226882644/" title="Banded Iron Formation by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3704/12226882644_38738f51b6_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Banded Iron Formation"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Banded Fe Formation<br />(Specimen 2)</td><td align="center">with magnet<br />(Specimen 2)</td><td align="center">vein detail<br />(Specimen 2)</td></tr></table>
Quote: Originally posted by bfesser  
I tried taking photos of some of my mica schist specimens a few days ago, but my camera battery died before I got up to the good specimens from the <a href="http://www.mindat.org/loc-22519.html" target="_blank">Black Hills, SD</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />.
I recharged the batteries and took these photos today&mdash;not the outcrop:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226644733/" title="Almandine Staurolite Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3800/12226644733_51e5825315_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Almandine Staurolite Schist"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226435345/" title="Staurolite Almandine Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7332/12226435345_b7e9d3c6ff_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Staurolite Almandine Schist"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226606183/" title="Staurolite Almandine Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2888/12226606183_eef61e915d_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Staurolite Almandine Schist"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Almandine Staurolite Schist</td><td align="center">Staurolite Almandine Schist</td><td align="center">Staurolite Almandine Schist</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12227284236/" title="Almandine Mica Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3766/12227284236_c4a7ea363d_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Almandine Mica Schist"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226641115/" title="Phyllite by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2854/12226641115_bb53b349ec_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Phyllite"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226754613/" title="Schorl Muscovite Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5524/12226754613_966b795f51_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Schorl Muscovite Schist"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Almandine Mica Schist</td><td align="center">Phyllite</td><td align="center">Schorl Muscovite Schist</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226528335/" title="Almandine Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2831/12226528335_57316294e1_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Almandine Schist"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226697643/" title="Mica Schist by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7348/12226697643_708f9b42ed_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Mica Schist"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/11989791613/" title="DSCN0232 by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2832/11989791613_0d7e96aa57_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="DSCN0232"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Almandine Mica Schist</td><td align="center">Mica Schist</td><td align="center">Schist?</td></tr></table>
Quote: Originally posted by chemrox  
I just started looking at these. The first were the mineral fluorite... good examples too... typical colors are white, violet-purple and green. The purple kind is easily confused with amethyst until you scratch it.
I agree that they're a bit tricky to distinguish by appearance. A simple scratch test would allow <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohs_scale_of_mineral_hardness" target="_blank">relative hardness</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> of <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664&page=2#pid316786">these specimens</a> to be determined. <a href="http://www.mindat.org/min-1576.html" target="_blank">Fluorite</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> has a hardness of 4, while <a href="http://www.mindat.org/min-3337.html" target="_blank">quartz</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> has a hardness of 7. Failing to scratch plate glass (5.5) would rule out quartz.

Finally, since the subject of mica has been brought up:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226843263/" title="Biotite &amp; Muscovite by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3732/12226843263_232d4b69d8_m.jpg" width="180" height="240" alt="Biotite &amp; Muscovite"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12226743743/" title="Muscovite by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2844/12226743743_5b32cefdc5_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Muscovite"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Biotite & Muscovite</td><td align="center">Muscovite</td></tr></table>

[Edited on 31.1.14 by bfesser]

Pathos - 30-1-2014 at 20:35

Quote:
Pathos I will fiddle with the amber colored rock and take another photo this weekend. What about that dirty white crinkled rock I posted, would a white tree sap mineralize or if anyone has a guess?
I came across these amber tidbits if anyone can add to it or point out any flaws.
http://www.rockhounds.com/rockshop/trueamber.shtml


Coolio. Try to get a shot of each tip or corner if possible! We found a bunch of those white-crinkled rocks too in our searches, & my friend kept a few of the cooler ones, but I can't remember if we ever determined what it was or not(much less what the name was if we did). I might be able to track him down and grab a piece for analysis though.
That's a very helpful Amber site! Their specimens are supeeerrr cleaned up - no doubt ball-milled & polished too - but trust me every natural piece I've seen looks almost exactly like yours. Regardless a real test is the only way to know. The Density and Acetone tests would be a breeze to do, and then you'd know for sure.

bfesser: WOW nice pics of some very nice specimens! Those sheets of muscovite are veerrry neat indeed. I couldn't zoom all the way in on the Almandine Mica Schist pics, but the general appearance reminds me of a few chunks I collected because they had what looked like a black pyrite all over them. Is that how you would describe it? I'll post some pics of what I'm talking about (along with the aquamarines and some fluorites) when I get home very soon here.
chemrox was right on the money though, the green and clear/cloudy white/purple ones are all fluorite. My buddy and I tested the theory back when we collected our samples, and they were identical to morgan's pics. REALLY wish I still had some pics of them! GRR!

pics coming soon!

Morgan - 1-2-2014 at 19:16

The amber colored crinkle rock is about as hard as quartz I would say and certainly not a 2-3. I heated an edge and it changed to a darker orange and a tiny flaky shard popped off. I hit the rock with the wire wheel side of my grinder and then the grinding stone side and it's hard. Still I don't have a name for it.



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[Edited on 2-2-2014 by Morgan]

Morgan - 1-2-2014 at 19:39

bfesser here's that one rock I tried to magnify for you with meager results. With my eyes it seems like one or two flecks are red but the camera doesn't really show it.

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Morgan - 1-2-2014 at 19:43

This rock is really glittery in strong sunlight and it leaves glitter on your fingers too.


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bfesser - 1-2-2014 at 19:45

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
Still I don't have a name for it.
<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agate" target="_blank">Agate</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />

2nd specimen: I'm sticking by my tentative identification (phyllite).
3rd specimen: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biotite" target="_blank">Biotite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> schist with garnet.

[Edited on 2.2.14 by bfesser]

Morgan - 1-2-2014 at 19:51

Neodymium magnets will stick to this, better in some spots if I recall. It has a more glittery appearance and slightly greener if viewed directly instead of the camera.

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Morgan - 1-2-2014 at 20:00

I was going to say agate but it would have been a guess. I vaguely remember some agates on the coast of Oregon, rocks along the seashore.
Here's something relavent perhaps.
http://people.oregonstate.edu/~wilsolau/agates.html
http://oregonagateguide.blogspot.com/2013/05/rough-carnelian...

<!-- bfesser_edit_tag -->[<a href="u2u.php?action=send&username=bfesser">bfesser</a>: removed unnecessary quote(s)]

[Edited on 2.2.14 by bfesser]

Morgan - 1-2-2014 at 20:15

I think I found the source of that piece of white crinkle rock but not the name.


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Morgan - 1-2-2014 at 20:28

I was wondering what the green is?



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blargish - 1-2-2014 at 22:16

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
This is some crumbly rock I have no idea about.


Is it possible that the blue is turquoise? I've seen rough turquoise samples that look similar...


The "crinkle rock" above looks to be some sort of chalcedony (agate?) with a vug of quartz drusy.

Also, that's a nice biotite garnet schist specimen you got

[Edited on 2-2-2014 by blargish]

Morgan - 2-2-2014 at 07:03

blargish I will see what I can do to figure out what that turquoise suspect is. Oddly, I thought the dirt on the crinkle rock kind of enhanced the quality of the crinkles.

Morgan - 2-2-2014 at 07:10

This one reminds me of fine clay sort of.



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bfesser - 2-2-2014 at 08:27

<strong>Morgan;</strong><ol><li>Please perform tests on the specimen. As I've repeatedly pointed out, you can't reliably identify rocks & minerals from photos alone.</li><li>Quartz (amethyst & citrine) with <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malachite" target="_blank">malachite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /></li><li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slate" target="_blank">Slate</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /></li></ol><hr width="80%" />
How about some <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structural_geology" target="_blank">Structural Geology</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geomorphology" target="_blank">Geomorphology</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />?

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12021788934/" title="Hogback by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7385/12021788934_99bf6c0e05_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Hogback"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12022096523/" title="Shell Creek Monocline by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3773/12022096523_c6fd7a7a78_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Shell Creek Monocline"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12021468725/" title="Amsden Formation Syncline by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3680/12021468725_3d9d4f1ed0_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Amsden Formation Syncline"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogback_(geology)" target="_blank">Hogback</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /></td><td align="center"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monocline" target="_blank">Monocline</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /></td><td align="center"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syncline" target="_blank">Syncline</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> (accompanying fault)</td></tr></table>


[Edited on 2.2.14 by bfesser]

Morgan - 2-2-2014 at 08:38

I split some black obsidian . The pieces almost look like black tar, how smooth they are when fractured.



092.JPG - 146kB096.JPG - 136kB110.JPG - 157kB

Morgan - 2-2-2014 at 09:09

I might try some colorful green fire flame test with the copper carbonate from one of those rocks bfesser, just to see what kind vividness I can get using methanol. Thanks for identifying the specimen. I remember reading somewhere, perhaps National Geographic or something about Russia and malachite, that the dust from working the works of art an occupational hazard, back when they were made.
Here's a colorful corrosion effect.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Verdigris.JPG

"The flame was actually green and I think its from the cooper because I did not add any boric acid."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIstWmvSkbA

[Edited on 2-2-2014 by Morgan]

Morgan - 2-2-2014 at 10:23

Here's a quartz-like rock which is slightly translucent on the outer surface that seems kind of geode or vug in nature. It's really heavy so probably not hollow. Maybe it would be more telling if it were cracked or sawed open.

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Pathos - 3-2-2014 at 01:50

Ah, I see the orange one ended up being agate. The extra pics/angles were definitely helpful. Latest crinkly pics are rad - nice rock! Same goes for that biotite garnet schist specimen. Be careful with that one if its very soft because those garnets could just fall out & would be tragic to lose them.

These are a couple days later than I had originally anticipated - but here's those Aquamarine w/ Muscovite pics I mentioned previously, along with a couple Fluorites just for fun :cool:

Aquamarines:
Aqua1.jpg - 144kB aqua2.jpg - 150kB aqua3.jpg - 125kB aqua4.jpg - 142kB aqua6.jpg - 126kB aqua7.jpg - 128kB aqua5.jpg - 228kB


Fluorites:
fluorite1.jpg - 112kB fluorite2.jpg - 200kB fluorite3.jpg - 155kB

Sorry about the lighting :(...I was pretty stoked to see how well the "phantoms" and bevelled edges showed up in the first fluorite pic. That's probably one of my fav crystals. It was *flawless* the day I got it - and later that same day I was doing some homework and put it on the base of my lamp so I could get a better look at it. Needless to say I somehow knocked it off, and it fell a distance of 1 inch onto the desk below. That's what caused the noticeable 'ding' just to the left of the bottom-point in the diamond-oriented cube...so weak...

[Edited on 2-3-2014 by Pathos]

Pathos - 3-2-2014 at 02:21

Might as well post these while I'm at it...
1. Smokey Quartz
2. Rose Quartz
3. White Tourmaline with what looks like black tourmaline - but its actually the smallest "Watermelon tourmaline" I've ever seen! lol

4&5. Name that rock? Heh...I found these digging through my collection and can't remember for the life of me what they're called. Eventually I can ask the friend I got them from and he'll remember, but figured I'd post here first. Any guesses?



smokeyquartz.jpg - 137kB rosequartz.jpg - 210kB tourmalines.jpg - 134kB mystery1.jpg - 180kB mystery2.jpg - 154kB

bfesser - 3-2-2014 at 05:21

Pathos, I have three questions for you regarding your photos. First&mdash;and I'm being serious, here&mdash;do you have any color-blindness? If not, and second; what type of camera are you using to take these photos? Finally, did you collect these specimens yourself or did you purchase them (implied: do you know the localities)?

Perhaps it's just the photos, but I don't see as much as a tinge of blue-green in your 'aquamarine' specimens. If they were my own, I would label them as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beryl" target="_blank">beryl</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> with muscovite. They're absolutely beautiful, nonetheless&mdash;I particularly like the terminated specimen in the 5th&ndash;7th photos. The phantoms in the fluorite are likewise beautiful. I love your specimens.

In your last post, the smokey quartz looks a bit like citrine. But these distinctions are more gemological than mineralogical, I think. As with the beryl, I'm not seeing the expected color in your photo of 'rose quartz.' How did you come to the identities of the specimens in the third photo&mdash;to me, they don't seem to match your description.

As for the specimens for which you've forgotten the name, they're <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanadinite" target="_blank">vanadinite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />&mdash;and I'm 100% certain of it. They look to be quite sun-damaged, however. I'd recommend keep them in a dark dry place when you're not enjoying viewing them. I posted a <a href="viewthread.php?tid=14644&page=17#pid247603">bad photo of a vanadinite</a> specimen in my collection, a couple years ago.

[Edited on 3.2.14 by bfesser]

blargish - 3-2-2014 at 10:09

On the topic of beryl, here is an emerald vein in a biotite schist.

Also, I have this bought specimen that is labeled Magnetite /w Matrix (which seems to be a schist or phyllite). However, the octahedral crystals show no response to any magnet and do not deflect a compass needle. I have always thought that magnetite was magnetic... Any thoughts?

IMG_0686.jpg - 175kB IMG_0667.jpg - 208kB

Morgan - 3-2-2014 at 10:53

Some common rocks and ordinary unloved rocks with different patterns in them ... I like the one on the end of the top row for the tiny root-like features. You can see them better if you enlarge the photo.

019.JPG - 212kB 022.JPG - 165kB 026.JPG - 150kB 047.JPG - 165kB 049.JPG - 177kB 051.JPG - 176kB 054.JPG - 172kB 057.JPG - 162kB 058.JPG - 158kB 060.JPG - 156kB


[Edited on 3-2-2014 by Morgan]

Morgan - 3-2-2014 at 11:03

Bear with me, I've more.

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Morgan - 3-2-2014 at 11:10

Blessedly the last.

112.JPG - 190kB117.JPG - 185kB129.JPG - 135kB130.JPG - 132kB144.JPG - 206kB161.JPG - 126kB162.JPG - 137kB034.JPG - 174kB

Morgan - 4-2-2014 at 07:14

I was looking at your clear fluorite crystals Pathos and it reminded me of mine that I have in a box somewhere but they are purple. And I was wondering if it was iron or manganese or what that makes them purple? In the article below, very large cubic crystals occur.
Are there any minerals that are a mix of calcium fluoride and other salts? I remember an old book on growing crystals where you could distort the crystals by adding other salts.

"Fluorite comes in a wide range of colors and has subsequently been dubbed "the most colorful mineral in the world". The most common colors are purple, blue, green, yellow, or colorless. Less common are pink, red, white, brown, black, and nearly every shade in between. Color zoning or banding is commonly present. The color of the fluorite is determined by factors including impurities, exposure to radiation, and the size of the color centers."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorite

bfesser - 4-2-2014 at 10:07

Coloration in minerals isn't always caused by the presence of transition metal ions. Colors can also arise from the optical effects (diffraction) of physical structures within the specimen (pseudochromatic) and a certain type of crystallographic defect called an <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-Center" target="_blank">F-Center</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />, which are created by naturally occurring ionizing radiation&mdash;as hinted at in your quote. Of course, man has taken advantage of this phenomena to produce artificially colored gems, which are sometimes misleadingly sold as natural specimens.

See also:
<a href="http://www.minsocam.org/msa/collectors_corner/arc/color.htm" target="_blank">The Origins of Color in Minerals</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> (American Mineralogist)
<a href="http://minerals.gps.caltech.edu/color_causes/" target="_blank">The Colors of Minerals</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> (Caltech)
<a href="http://www.minsocam.org/msa/collectors_corner/arc/colorradiation.htm" target="_blank">The Coloring and Thermophosphorescence Produced in Transparent Minerals and Gems by Radium Radiation</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> (American Mineralogist)
<a href="http://www.enmu.edu/services/museums/miles-mineral/colors.shtml" target="_blank">Colors in Minerals</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> (Eastern New Mexico University)

On a related note; there has been a huge influx artificial 'mineral specimens' on the market which are originating from China and Poland&mdash;surely other countries, as well&mdash;at the moment, so just be mindful of this if you're purchasing specimens off eBay and the like. Some of the minerals are artificially colored by exposure to ionizing radiation, heat treatment, or similar means. Some of the specimens (CuSO<sub>4</sub> and Bi, in particular) are just lab grown fakes. And some specimens are even glued together from unrelated minerals. Some of the sellers advertise this plainly (e.g. <a href="http://www.ebay.com/itm/131104787298" target="_blank">"Chalcanthite - Lab Grown in Poland"</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />;), others hide the truth in fine print; some are ambiguous (e.g. <a href="http://www.ebay.com/itm/331120436704" target="_blank">"DINO: RAINBOW BISMUTH Crystal Mineral Specimen - 33 gr. Germany"</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />;), and a few just lie outright.

See also:
<a href="http://www.the-vug.com/vug/vugfakes.html" target="_blank">Fake Crystals, Minerals, Gemstones, Lapidary and Fossils Guide</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> (The-Vug.com)
<a href="http://www.fakeminerals.com/" target="_blank">FakeMinerals.com/</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />

[note: I recently watched a recording of an interesting lecture on this topic (F-centers), but it was on a DVD that I don't own. I'll try to find a copy to share. I also had a couple papers and a book to share, but I'll likewise have to retrieve them. I will be editing this post, as usual; so please don't quote it.]

[Edited on 8.2.14 by bfesser]

Morgan - 7-2-2014 at 14:35

I was looking in a few boxes for my purple fluorite crystals and came across these rocks in boxes. The first one didn't photograph well, it's exceedingly glittery but not for the camera. It's a magic rock, completely jet black in indoor light.

002.JPG - 193kB006.JPG - 172kB017.JPG - 195kB007.JPG - 156kB008.JPG - 143kB010.JPG - 146kB013.JPG - 166kB014.JPG - 157kB019.JPG - 199kB023.JPG - 212kB

Morgan - 7-2-2014 at 14:44

More box rocks.


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Morgan - 7-2-2014 at 15:02

The last of these.


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blargish - 7-2-2014 at 15:10

Some of those look really cool! The golden-rainbowish one in your first set of pictures looks like bornite or chalcopyrite (I'm not really sure how I can tell them apart in their massive forms).

I have no clue what the first rock is in the second group of photos you posted. The group of lighter ones that follow seem to be turquoise, but I'm not so sure. My guess for the final blue rock in your second group of images is sodalite.

Love the pictures!

Morgan - 7-2-2014 at 15:38

I noticed the fake mineral link had some acanthite ore that was said to have been heated to form the "silver wires." It's funny how they look like some frost flowers, plants chilled to form ice ribbons.

http://www.the-vug.com/vug/vugfakes.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frost_flower
http://my.ilstu.edu/~jrcarter/ice/

bfesser - 8-2-2014 at 15:01

I'm going to repeat this; you generally can't identify a rock or mineral from photographs alone. That being said, here are my suggestions:
Quote: Originally posted by blargish  
Also, I have this bought specimen that is labeled Magnetite /w Matrix (which seems to be a schist or phyllite). However, the octahedral crystals show no response to any magnet and do not deflect a compass needle. I have always thought that magnetite was magnetic... Any thoughts?
<strong>blargish</strong>, it could be a hematite <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudomorph" target="_blank">pseudomorph</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> after <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetite" target="_blank">magnetite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />; a red streak would confirm this.

<strong>Morgan</strong>:
From <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664&goto=search&pid=317757">this post</a>, 026.JPG is <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartz#Rose_quartz" target="_blank">rose quartz</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. 047.JPG, 049.JPG, and 051.JPG look to be shale with various iron staining and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrite_(crystal)" target="_blank">dendritic manganese</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> (clearly visible in the second photo). Apply a drop of 3 % H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>(aq) to the dendrites to watch the effervescence as the Mn/Fe oxides catalytically decompose the peroxide, producing oxygen.

From <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664&goto=search&pid=317759">this post</a>, 098.JPG & 100.JPG look like <a href="http://www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/resources/public_room/gis/metadata/clinker-wy.html" target="_blank">clinker</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" /> (metamorphic produced by naturally burning coal beds) or maybe <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scoria" target="_blank">scoria</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> (volcanic). Many would erroneously guess <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumice" target="_blank">pumice</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> (volcanic).

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12021779824/" title="Clinker by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7428/12021779824_cf3b7df3f7_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Clinker"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Clinker, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powder_River_Basin" target="_blank">Powder River Basin</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />, WY</td></tr></table>
From <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664&goto=search&pid=317761">this post</a>, 112.JPG & 117.JPG are a crystal formation called (colloquially) a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_rose_(crystal)" target="_blank">'desert rose'</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. It could be <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsum" target="_blank">gypsum</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> or <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baryte" target="_blank">baryte</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />.

From <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664&goto=search&pid318286">this post</a>, 007.JPG, 008.JPG, and 010.JPG are very obviously fluorite. You should wrap the specimen in newspaper to protect it from further damage in the boxes. 013.JPG and 014.JPG are <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalcopyrite" target="_blank">chalcopyrite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />, possibly <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bornite">bornite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />, as <strong>blargish</strong> suggested.

Finally, from <a href="viewthread.php?tid=28664&goto=search&pid=318287">this post</a>, 024.JPG, 025.JPG, & 027.JPG look like <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysocolla" target="_blank">chrysocolla</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />, which is often mistaken for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise" target="_blank">turquoise</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. 028.JPG & 031.JPG could be turquoise. 033.JPG and 037.JPG could be <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrite" target="_blank">pyrite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> with a bit of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limonite" target="_blank">limonite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> on the surface, and quartz. 049.JPG and 050.jpg; <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azurite" target="_blank">azurite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />, perhaps?

[Edited on 9.2.14 by bfesser]

Morgan - 8-2-2014 at 18:09

Thanks for the identifications bfesser. The dendritic manganese in Wiki looks like a piece of artwork. I like that effect.

The rock that looks like chrysocolla is such an odd color to me. And this angle shows another shade on one corner. The rock reminds me of clay that became metamorphic.
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/files.php?pid=318287&...

I've a couple of larger fluorite crystal clusters somewhere, with full cubes all mingled together. It's the same kind of purple as the one posted and they're my favorite for the way they look. I like my ulexite rock too though.
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/files.php?pid=264583&...
And as an aside, I like this little ring.
http://www.websitebakery.com/2010/05/

[Edited on 9-2-2014 by Morgan]

bfesser - 9-2-2014 at 12:11

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
The dendritic manganese in Wiki looks like a piece of artwork. I like that effect.
It is a beautiful effect. Here are a few specimens in my collection:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12414327015/" title="Manganese Dendrites by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3795/12414327015_ac24eab6db_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Manganese Dendrites"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12414841504/" title="Dolostone by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7295/12414841504_73afac3070_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Dolostone"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12414390095/" title="Unknown Rock with Mn Dendrites by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2893/12414390095_2fe81da9b7_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Unknown Rock with Mn Dendrites"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">on Bavarian Limestone</td><td align="center">on Dolostone from WY</td><td align="center">In another WY rock</td></tr></table>
There have been a couple mentions of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jade" target="_blank">'jade'</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> in this thread, so here are some specimens I collected in the Bighorn Mts., Wyoming:

<table><tr><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12414398535/" title="Jade Conglomerate by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7444/12414398535_0f09c2c1b2_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Jade Conglomerate"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12414896554/" title="Jade Clasts by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blanK"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7376/12414896554_8890f0a841_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Jade Clasts"></a></td><td><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35937732@N02/12414429515/" title="Jade Clasts (wet) by bfesser, on Flickr" target="_blank"><img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2829/12414429515_bb3b7b3711_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Jade Clasts (wet)"></a></td></tr><tr><td align="center">Conglomerate of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actinolite" target="_blank">Actinolite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> (var. Nephrite)</td><td align="center">Actinolite (var. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nephrite" target="_blank">Nephrite</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />;) Clasts</td><td align="center">show their color better when wet</td></tr></table>

[Edited on 9.2.14 by bfesser]

blargish - 9-2-2014 at 21:08

The past Canadian Thanksgiving Monday I made my mom drive me for 2 hrs up to the Warsaw Caves :D, an area near Peterborough with really cool limestone Karst formations (Ordovician period). I didn't take many photos because I only had my phone with me, but here are a few:

Here, the jointing in the limestone pavement is very noticeable
IMG_0298.jpg - 370kB IMG_0296.jpg - 418kB

The smooth holes in the limestone here are some small kettles. The kettles are not inherent to the Karst landscape; their creation is due to the fact that the whole area was a major glacial spillway during the last ice age. There are a few giant kettles in the area (I did not take photos of them), some of which are large enough for you to climb down into
IMG_0305.jpg - 358kB

These next two photos are from within the caves themselves, they aren't very big, and show the limestone bedding.
IMG_0292.jpg - 230kB IMG_0294.jpg - 181kB

Please excuse the blurry images!

There is a noticeable absence of fossils in the limestone formations (only rarely you see traces of snails/shellfish in the caves) for reasons which I do not know. Black chert is common in the limestone and you will often see large bands of it cutting through. Also, numerous erratic boulders are strewn throughout the area due to it being a major glacial spillway. It really is an awesome place!


Bfesser, those dendritic samples you have look sweet!

[Edited on 10-2-2014 by blargish]

arkoma - 10-2-2014 at 02:18

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
Some curvy things. They're quite heavy. You can see a porousness to them.
look like petrified bones. Went on a field trip in school to a phosphate pit in Florida and I remembe rfinding stuff like that

Morgan - 11-2-2014 at 15:39

My cousin used to work at the phosphate mine in Central Florida. He had a huge hand-sized shark tooth from there that was as big as the ones you seen in museums.

Some fossil news
Researchers discover 'epic' new Burgess Shale site in Canada's Kootenay National Park
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-02/uot-rd021014....

Morgan - 23-2-2014 at 09:19

A few more dendrites and tidbits ...

Numerous nucleation centers
http://minerals.gps.caltech.edu/FILES/DENDRITE/Panamint_Mtns...

http://minerals.gps.caltech.edu/FILES/DENDRITE/best_den.gif

http://minerals.gps.caltech.edu/FILES/DENDRITE/Index.html

Zyklon-A - 24-2-2014 at 10:00

I'm not a big rock collector, but I thought I'd post a picture of a cool (in my opinion) rock.
Here is a rock that I found in my creek. PICT0115.jpg - 156kB
From what I can tell, it's some calcite grown on an unknown rock, with some mica and iron pyrite (iron II sulfide.)



[Edited on 24-2-2014 by Zyklonb]

Morgan - 2-3-2014 at 10:37

Kind of an interesting dendrite-like effect.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmBljeC79Ls#t=2m3s

Morgan - 18-7-2015 at 15:33

I found this curious rock out in the garage among some old sea shells and shark's teeth and wondered what it might be. One "top" face that I didn't photograph just looks glazed like a meteorite but the sides look like bent lines vaguely like petrified wood, or maybe volcanic goings-on. A strong neodymium magnet will not lift it but it's magnetic and heavy.




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diddi - 19-7-2015 at 01:18

@ morgan
these ones posted on 8-2-2014 at 09:02 are:
1-4 - pertified wood. not sure of species (need to cut it)
5-7 - tiger eye

posted on 4-2-2014 at 05:10
1-2 - selenite "blades" or "flowers"
3-5 - more pertified wood
6-7 - banded orange calcite (massive)
8 - amethyst

posted on 8-2-2014 at 09:02
1-3 - possibly a fine hornblende?
4-6 - purple fluorite
7-8 - bornite
9-10 - lace agate

the lump above I suspect is iron slag?

[Edited on 19-7-2015 by diddi]

j_sum1 - 19-7-2015 at 01:23

Now I know who to ask if I need a rock identified.
Nicely done, diddi.

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