Sciencemadness Discussion Board

latest glassware purchase

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WangleSpong5000 - 19-11-2017 at 03:20

I bought a 24/29 thermometer adapter with a plastic screw top. Kinda wishing I bought one of the really cool all glass ones, 'thermometer wells' I believe they're called?

Sulaiman - 19-11-2017 at 08:11

For most distillations I use one of the cheap Chinese thermometer adapters with plastic screw top and rubber "O" ring, even with NO2 fumes etc. I rarely use my thermometer pockets/wells.

Only a tiny area of rubber is exposed to the inside of the glassware, and so far, a little silicone grease has kept the rubber rings intact.

You may want to add something aroung the thermometer above the joint just in case the thermometer slips through the adapter and crashes into the bottom of ypur flask or whatever, I use a tight fitting "O" ring but a rubber band wrapped many times tightly around the stem of the thermometer works too, but obscures the thermometer scale - often at the critical temperature range :P

WangleSpong5000 - 19-11-2017 at 22:36

Cheers for the advice! :)

I must say I really love the look of the wells though... not a priority of course but still. :D

j_sum1 - 19-11-2017 at 23:21

A well makes for an ok cold finger in some cases. I don't think I have actually used mine for a thermometer yet. A well also needs to be just the right length for measuring temperature.

A standard screw top thermometer adapter is acually a pretty versatile piece of kit. Insert a glass tube asnd tou can bubble gasses. Or you can use it for removinng gases.

TheNerdyFarmer - 20-11-2017 at 06:05

Looks to me like the two different styles of adapters are about the same price.

Thermometer well:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/282240394913

Standard Screw Top Adapter:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/24-40-Glass-Thermometer-Adapter-W-T...

These are of course Chinese pieces of glassware.

I do not own a thermometer well (yet) but from what i can see, these are particularly useful for things like thermocouples that have stainless steel/aluminum rods in them.

arkoma - 21-11-2017 at 14:07

A 500ml erlenmeyer to replace the one I broke

JJay - 2-12-2017 at 16:55

I got some 4L glass gallon jugs that formerly held fruit juice. I have several of these; I thoroughly wash and dry them and use them mainly to store dry bulk powders like calcium carbonate, magnesium sulfate, etc.

NEMO-Chemistry - 7-12-2017 at 18:20

ooops wrong thread

[Edited on 8-12-2017 by NEMO-Chemistry]

arkoma - 7-12-2017 at 18:59

500ml Erlenmeyer from Deschem. Around $6US delivered from China.

WangleSpong5000 - 7-12-2017 at 19:33

A 100ml glass measuring cylinder... broken of course. Oh we'll, at least it wasn't something expensive. Still annoying...

Vosoryx - 7-12-2017 at 21:32

You going to get a refund on that? If you bought it online, most will offer a refund or replacement for broken items.

WangleSpong5000 - 7-12-2017 at 22:56

Yeah I probably should... it's only a few bucks yet I literally do not have a few bucks...

Actually I tell a lie. I have $6... :D

Sulaiman - 8-12-2017 at 01:56

Quote: Originally posted by TheNerdyFarmer  
Looks to me like the two different styles of adapters are about the same price.

Thermometer well:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/282240394913

Standard Screw Top Adapter:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/24-40-Glass-Thermometer-Adapter-W-T...

These are of course Chinese pieces of glassware.

I do not own a thermometer well (yet) but from what i can see, these are particularly useful for things like thermocouples that have stainless steel/aluminum rods in them.


One reason that I use my screw-top adapters more than wells is thermal lag,
an other is that as above, only the correct length well will work well, and I only have a choice of two lengths,
and
I have a well/pocket exactly like the one pointed to,
the joint is a little too small so it slips inside female joints just a little too far,
and it is not perfectly round, so I have to use ptfe tape for the joint to seal properly, but it is useful for my three-neck rbfs.

So far I have had no problems with my two screw-top adapters even though they do not look of the highest quality.

Also, as above, the screw-top type can accept a glass tube for bubbling gasses etc. ... VERY useful.

So WangleSpong5000 , I think that you made a good choice.

WangleSpong5000 - 8-12-2017 at 02:45

Ahh yeah I can see the issue with the thermometer wells regrading length... Only now that I've actually done a few distillations can I see the utility and versatility of a regular screw top adapter. Have already used it for bubbling gasses... Super handy! I never even considered thermal lag but it makes sense now that I think about it.

And yeah... the plastic screw cap looks a bit dodgy on my one not to mention the rubber aperture bit which is a bit loose for my liking. Plus, it's Chinese glass and while it's fine I can see the difference between it and the rest of my glassware which I bought in Australia... so lol it maybe made in China anyway haha

TheNerdyFarmer - 8-12-2017 at 18:17

I do believe that the screw top thermometer holders are useful. I have used mine for all sorts of things. However, when I distilled nitric acid, the fumes completely destroyed to o-rings in it and cause a lot of fume leakage. From what I have observed, the screw top is probably the most useful and acts mainly as a "one size fits most" but, in very harsh conditions, a thermometer well might be a better option. When I say harsh conditions I am referring to things like very high temp distillation, oxidizing conditions, and, somewhat less harsh, but something that should still be taken into consideration, boiling solvents (causing damage to the o-ring and cap).

JJay - 9-12-2017 at 00:44

I ordered two of Gilbert Hardware's wash bottles in the 125 mL size, and they arrived today. I was surprised to see that the quality is fairly low; there are a lot of bubbles where the takeoff barbs are attached, and the inlet tube joint does not sit flush with the wash bottle joint. I'm sure they will still function ok, but I am not impressed.

Nanshin is currently selling some 500 mL wash bottles that are claimed to be "premium" quality. The have excellent reviews and appear to be high quality in the photos.

JJay - 9-12-2017 at 17:32

I just noticed this, but one thing I do like about Gilbert Hardware's wash bottles is the size of the inlet adapter on the 125 mL wash bottles - it is 24/29 and goes nicely to the bottom of a 1L flask. While it's not fancy and is low quality, the bottles and/or adapters will be handy in places where I'm concerned about suckback or excess gases or to protect a vacuum pump.

PirateDocBrown - 9-12-2017 at 17:57

I have a well, as well as a screw top adapter, but also one of those that has a rubber fitment serving as a thermometer holder.

If anyone has a line on new such fitments at a decent price, let me know, as the one I have is getting oxidized and stiff, which means cracking is not far off.

Thomas Scientific has them for 5 bucks, but wants $20 minimum for shipping.

[Edited on 12/10/17 by PirateDocBrown]

Morgan - 11-12-2017 at 16:31

A jacketed beaker to tinker with ...


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Brom - 11-12-2017 at 18:05

Nice. I have been considering ordering one of those jacketed beakers for a while. It would be nice to not have to conduct exothermic reactions in an ice bath. It would also probably be more efficient at cooling compared to sitting in an ice bath. PETN, and picric acid are a couple of reactions where the ease of superior cooling could come in really handy.

[Edited on 12-12-2017 by Brom]

WangleSpong5000 - 18-12-2017 at 22:21

I really like those jacketed beakers Morgan. They're awesome!

I just received a bunch of beakers: 250ml, 150ml, 100ml, 50ml, 25ml (broken), 10ml and a 5ml. The 10ml or 5ml are obviously ridiculously small but they came in a set and they are super cute... I feel like a giant holding them haha (yes I am a child :D)

They came packaged like little Russian Bubushka dolls.

warteo - 22-12-2017 at 15:46

Christmas present to myself, got all this for a great price.

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CharlieA - 22-12-2017 at 18:02

I use 5 and 10 mL beakers frequently. When I need to accurately measure out a few mL of a stock solution or liquid, I pour it first into one of these little beakers, and then pipette the required amount from the beaker. This helps prevent contamination of the main container.
And if I'm honest, the beakers were only a couple of dollars for a dozen of each, and they're just cute!

JJay - 5-1-2018 at 16:04

I got some Qorpak PTFE-lined caps in the mail and picked up and a few more 500 ml Boston round bottles from my local health food store (which has also started stocking larger bottles after many requests and even a few chemicals). The caps fit.

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SWIM - 10-1-2018 at 21:24

Just bought this 'condenser' from somebody for $56!


Oldershaw column.jpg - 2kB

I got the Midas touch.
I got the Midas touch.
everything I touch it turns to gold.

(Or is it the miner's touch?)

EDIT: Aw crap, you can't tell what it is in the damn photo.

15-plate Oldershaw column.

No vacuum jacket, but you can't have everything.

(Of course you can't have everything. Where the hell would you keep it?)

[Edited on 11-1-2018 by SWIM]

CharlieA - 11-1-2018 at 18:22

How many theoretical plates for that column? I'm guessing that you will have some great separations/purifications by distillation.
On another note: if you had everything, wouldn't you have to keep it everywhere? (Forgive me; it's been a long day :D)

SWIM - 11-1-2018 at 19:59

Quote: Originally posted by CharlieA  
How many theoretical plates for that column? I'm guessing that you will have some great separations/purifications by distillation.
On another note: if you had everything, wouldn't you have to keep it everywhere? (Forgive me; it's been a long day :D)


Good point. (about everything)
About the column I'm guessing it's 15, since it has 15 of those little trays in it. But what I don't know about Oldershaw columns you could almost cram into the Astrodome.
I figure I'll try it out with a variable reflux head and some insulation. But to be frank I have no Idea if there's any peculiarity to how these are used as opposed to like a Hempel column.

It should arrive next week. It's 29/42, and it's about 600mm long.

j_sum1 - 11-1-2018 at 20:57

Sweet piece of glass there SWIM. It is a design I have not seen before. How is the Oldershaw functionally different from a Snyder column? It does look a lot more compact and lacks the fun moving parts.

I too would guess 15 theoretical plates for your purchase. And I woud surmise that it would start doing strange things if it ever began to get flooded.

It seems you do have the Midas touch.
(The misers' touch is if you don't share it. The minus touch is when you drop it. And the miners' touch is if you are doing your chemistry underground.)

CharlieA - 12-1-2018 at 19:03

Here are a couple of papers I have, but honestly I haven't read. Maybe they will be some help concerning HETP. I thought I had a clearer explanation somewhere, but can't find it now. It may have been in Fieser's Org. chem lab manual, or maybe in Vogel. Both of those books are in the forum library, I think.

JJay - 12-1-2018 at 19:27

Quote: Originally posted by SWIM  


It should arrive next week. It's 29/42, and it's about 600mm long.


Nice. Those columns are super pricey!

I got a second 30 cm Vigreux from Deschem today (Deschem sells nice Vigreux columns). But unpacked, I doubt that the combined separating power of all of the columns of my humble lab have the separating power of that Oldershaw column.

I also got a couple of jointed quartz tubes. I'm going to wrap one with copper tubing and use it as a condenser and use the other one as a combustion tube. Boron tribromide is theoretically within my grasp.

Dr.Bob - 12-1-2018 at 20:14

I have a few various jacketed beakers and fritted funnels/reactors if people want any. I think the beakers are 100 to 400 ml, and the fritted reactors span tiny (1-2ml?) to medium ones, not really sure, most look custom or are unlabelled. But I am happy to sell them inexpensively, since they would take a while to list on Ebay. I'll try to get some photos one of these days, but they are mostly scattered in a few boxes of random things.

j_sum1 - 13-1-2018 at 21:32

Ok, not glassware but an interesting equipment purchase nonetheless.

At a garage sale today I scored about 15kg of lead for five bucks. There were two buckets of lead head nails, some lead bars and wires, some lead roofing flashing and this gem -- a home-made lead beaker. I don't think it will inspire me to do the lead chamber process but I can see it being useful for some electrolysis where I want a lead anode.
2018-01-14 15.04.25.jpg - 293kB


I also scored six glasses and a jug in what I believe is depresion-era uranium glass. Also five bucks. I have yet to test it though.

(Not sure whether this belongs here or in the repurposed/homemade lab gear or chemical purchases thread. Guess it is here now.)

Plunkett - 19-1-2018 at 07:57

I snagged three nice reagent bottles today from my university's dumpster. They were throwing out several empty Sigma Aldrich and Fisher bottles, mostly for alcohols and ammonia. I will go back for more but I could only fit so many in my backpack.

WangleSpong5000 - 2-2-2018 at 18:38

Just received a lovely 1 litre 24/29 Erlenmeyer flask. Also finally recieved my glass spirit thermometer... which I sat on within a day. Ffs...

SWIM - 22-3-2018 at 19:18

Got this little spinning band still today.

Just couldn't pass the damn thing up.

It's supposed to have 5 theoretical plates to the inch, so 12 or 15 total.

It's also supposed to have a 90 minute boil-up time, and that air condenser around the thermometer probably gives the whole thing quite a reflux ratio.

So distilling 4ml of something with this may take quite some time.

Anybody familiar with these?




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JJay - 22-3-2018 at 19:29

Wow, that is super cool. I wouldn't have passed it up either.

Morgan - 6-4-2018 at 10:06

Some little swizzle sticks that seemed like something nice to have for art or science, the total price a little under 8.6 cents per swizzle. What might be a typical use for these I wonder?

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[Edited on 6-4-2018 by Morgan]

RogueRose - 6-4-2018 at 17:34

Quote: Originally posted by SWIM  
Got this little spinning band still today.

Just couldn't pass the damn thing up.

It's supposed to have 5 theoretical plates to the inch, so 12 or 15 total.

It's also supposed to have a 90 minute boil-up time, and that air condenser around the thermometer probably gives the whole thing quite a reflux ratio.

So distilling 4ml of something with this may take quite some time.

Anybody familiar with these?








Could you maybe replace the pics with some in focus? There are some small details that are of interest. Nice snag, did you find it locally or online?

OldNubbins - 6-4-2018 at 17:58

Quote: Originally posted by RogueRose  

Could you maybe replace the pics with some in focus? There are some small details that are of interest. Nice snag, did you find it locally or online?


Look up a Hickman-Hinkle still.

wg48 - 7-4-2018 at 06:28

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
Some little swizzle sticks that seemed like something nice to have for art or science, the total price a little under 8.6 cents per swizzle. What might be a typical use for these I wonder?

[Edited on 6-4-2018 by Morgan]


I don't know what the typica use is. They will make good sleeves for thermocuples and heating element forms.

Are you in the UK or Europe, if so do you want to sell say ten of them and for how much?


Morgan - 7-4-2018 at 08:56

Quote: Originally posted by wg48  
Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
Some little swizzle sticks that seemed like something nice to have for art or science, the total price a little under 8.6 cents per swizzle. What might be a typical use for these I wonder?

[Edited on 6-4-2018 by Morgan]


I don't know what the typica use is. They will make good sleeves for thermocuples and heating element forms.

Are you in the UK or Europe, if so do you want to sell say ten of them and for how much?



I'm in the U.S.

j_sum1 - 7-4-2018 at 19:36

Having that much quartz seems like it should be useful for something.
Have you tested them for thermal shock?
How difficult is it to actually melt the end to make a thermocouple sleeve?

Morgan - 8-4-2018 at 07:55

The thought crossed my mind, but in the process of getting settled in a new house my torches aren't at hand. I wrote a company in the Netherlands late Friday to find out what the glass tubes are and what they might commonly be used for. It would be sad if they are just ordinary glass.
So just now it dawned on me a small handheld butane torch was in a box in the other room. What unfolding drama the little experiment was. Using a small wide glass of water, the mystery tube was heated above the water at the point in the 5 cm long flame. My heart sank when the blue flame started showing the typical signs of a sodium flare. But upon further heating the yellow faded and disappeared. Apparently wiping any oil or salt from handling on your shirttail is hardly the way to go of course, but the main test was going to be the thermal shock. And recalling how quartz lightbulbs have the warning not to handle them with your fingers, that oil or salts could damage them, that came to mind too.
The grand moment came when the hot end of the tube was submerged in water. Now I've dunked some 25 mm diameter Heraeus fused quartz in water and the sound it makes can be misleading, as if it might have cracked but this little 4 mm tubing not only sizzled and popped, it made a distinctive ping and it was heartbreakingly assumed to have surely fractured, but happily the factory flame polished end was still intack when removed from the water, yet disbelievingly so after first looking for fragments in the bottom of the glass.
Seeing some segments of water trapped or taken up in the tube from the test, it occurred to me one use, albeit meager, would be to craft a little putt-putt boat, the
tubing as good as metal in that respect.
https://sciencetoymaker.org/putt-putt-boat/patents-for-putt-...

On burping ...
"That was just the start of it. He set out to find out why some engines--even those without leaks--go dry and stop working. This is known as "burn out." It is very frustrating and mysterious."
https://sciencetoymaker.org/putt-putt-boat/putt-putt-boat-in...


[Edited on 8-4-2018 by Morgan]

Morgan - 8-4-2018 at 09:42

Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
Having that much quartz seems like it should be useful for something.
Have you tested them for thermal shock?
How difficult is it to actually melt the end to make a thermocouple sleeve?


I haven't melted any quartz but was able to only slightly deform a piece of 10 mm tubing one time with just a Mapp gas torch that mixes in air. Maybe a 4 mm tube would have a chance being smaller and more likely if you could surround the flame in fire brick or something perhaps. Quartz emits UV when working and I don't have any eyewear for that.
The coe of the thermocouple wire I guess would match that of quartz - if made for mating the two.

[Edited on 8-4-2018 by Morgan]

XeonTheMGPony - 10-4-2018 at 16:28

Well despite the posts best effort my new parts arrived. thanks to deschems excellent packers!

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[Edited on 11-4-2018 by XeonTheMGPony]

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j_sum1 - 10-4-2018 at 16:48

Yowzer!
It's a while since I have seen a postal parallelogram as good as that one.

Morgan - 11-4-2018 at 18:04

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
Some little swizzle sticks that seemed like something nice to have for art or science, the total price a little under 8.6 cents per swizzle. What might be a typical use for these I wonder?

More information ...
I contacted the eBay seller today and he wrote back this.
"I believe that the quartz tubes were meant to be used to make custom HID lamp bulbs.""I'm curious what you might be using them for though..."
I wrote him back and asked him the same and how he came about them. He said he had more.

I contacted Philips quartz and the representative said they were possibly the internal tube of a quartz bulb, the woman sounded like a new hire and couldn't find out anything more from the product code. I spent about ten minutes talking to her just to gather that scant information.

[Edited on 12-4-2018 by Morgan]

Morgan - 12-4-2018 at 09:36

The quartz tubes that were sold to me were going to be used for a flashlight. The seller replied "The custom bulbs were going to be for a special flashlight built for the military. They had to be custom made for the level of brightness and IR output required. "

JJay - 7-9-2018 at 03:26

eBay just gave me a $20 off coupon... I'm giving some serious thought to these:



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greenlight - 7-9-2018 at 03:49

Oooh thats a nice pressure equalizing funnel, haven't seen one with two stopcocks before.

JJay - 18-9-2018 at 14:51

I got a bump trap. Not only can I use it for distillations that bump a lot, I think it will function to keep column packing from falling out of the column.

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Sulaiman - 18-9-2018 at 17:44

JJay,
I have not been able to do any distillations for a while but
I'm convinced that bumping severely upsets equilibrium in a packed column,
ruining fine fractionations.
I've not tried boiling chips or surfactants but vigorous stirring helps a lot.


JJay - 18-9-2018 at 18:25

Oh, I don't doubt it... I don't usually run distillations without stirring, and I don't usually use a column with distillations that bump. I haven't been using packed columns because I haven't had a way to keep the column packed.

nimgoldman - 18-9-2018 at 20:43

Yeah I have that anti-bumping adapter too. It helped a lot when I need to distill about 230 ml of DCM. I could stuff all that in a 250 ml RBF and distill it while stirring. There was no bumping but lot of foaming which the adapter prevented.

My last purchase:

1. Erlenmeyer flasks with ground glass joints and glass Buchner funnels - to speed up filtrations and allow filtration right in the RBF

2. 90 mm powder funnel with ground glass joint (I got tired of cleaning the joints every time I pour a powder in flask via funnel)

3. Dean-Stark apparatus - for steam distillations, azeotropic distillations and removing water from refluxing mixtures

4. some RBFs

5. ball joint to male joint converter - so I can use different flasks with rotavap

6. pour adapter - for convenience :)

7. tiny volumetric flasks

Ubya - 19-9-2018 at 02:13


nanshinglass distillation kit $28+free shipping
2 glass aspirators 5€ each, bought in a random flea market
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monolithic - 26-9-2018 at 20:04

I'm not sure what this is called, but I'm looking for a porous/fritted piece of glass that I could affix to a 10mm or 3/8" piece of tubing for bubbling gas into solution. I know of Monteggia gas washing bottles, but I just want the glass so I can have a much more generalized apparatus. Does this exist, and if so, what is it called?

[Edited on 27-9-2018 by monolithic]

TheMrbunGee - 27-9-2018 at 00:29

Quote: Originally posted by monolithic  
I'm not sure what this is called, but I'm looking for a porous/fritted piece of glass that I could affix to a 10mm or 3/8" piece of tubing for bubbling gas into solution. I know of Monteggia gas washing bottles, but I just want the glass so I can have a much more generalized apparatus. Does this exist, and if so, what is it called?

[Edited on 27-9-2018 by monolithic]


Found this, hope it helps!

Ubya - 27-9-2018 at 02:34

Quote: Originally posted by TheMrbunGee  
Quote: Originally posted by monolithic  
I'm not sure what this is called, but I'm looking for a porous/fritted piece of glass that I could affix to a 10mm or 3/8" piece of tubing for bubbling gas into solution. I know of Monteggia gas washing bottles, but I just want the glass so I can have a much more generalized apparatus. Does this exist, and if so, what is it called?

[Edited on 27-9-2018 by monolithic]


Found this, hope it helps!


or if you want to spend less and you know how to bend glass tubing you could try with this

TheMrbunGee - 27-9-2018 at 02:57

Quote: Originally posted by Ubya  
Quote: Originally posted by TheMrbunGee  
Quote: Originally posted by monolithic  
I'm not sure what this is called, but I'm looking for a porous/fritted piece of glass that I could affix to a 10mm or 3/8" piece of tubing for bubbling gas into solution. I know of Monteggia gas washing bottles, but I just want the glass so I can have a much more generalized apparatus. Does this exist, and if so, what is it called?

[Edited on 27-9-2018 by monolithic]


Found this, hope it helps!


or if you want to spend less and you know how to bend glass tubing you could try with this



if you bend that an put it fritted part down, the glass border will trap some gas in it and it will function just like a plain tube. Making large bubbles only..

Ubya - 27-9-2018 at 03:17

i thought about that, if you have enough space it could be used as it is

Sulaiman - 27-9-2018 at 05:08

Quote: Originally posted by Ubya  
or if you want to spend less and you know how to bend glass tubing you could try with this
I have one of these, it works well - the correct way up.

I used it to aerate yeast/sugar as an experiment,
OK for a day or two then blocked.
I suspect that yeast grew in the pores and blocked them.
A soak in piranha solution has restored it to use.
I guess that whenever a reaction rather than simple dissolution is involved,
especially if a precipitate is anticipated,
there will be significant risk of blocking pores.
And blocked pores may lead to excessive gas pressure.........

If you blast air/gas through too rapidly then larger bubbles are formed,
- even when the correct way up.

[Edited on 27-9-2018 by Sulaiman]

monolithic - 27-9-2018 at 06:33

Thank you for the links, those items are exactly what I was looking for. :)

JJay - 27-9-2018 at 17:27

I finally bit the bullet and ordered a 250 mL addition funnel with two stopcocks. I also picked up another 30 cm Liebig.

Swinfi2 - 28-9-2018 at 13:53

I could have done with a second stopcock too but since I was distilling water i just plugged the fitting with loose cardboard.

My most recent glass is a 1L 3 neck 24/40 to replace my RIP 2 neck flask. f.

JJay - 15-10-2018 at 17:17

This is the first time I have ever seen one of these intact in person.

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j_sum1 - 15-10-2018 at 21:55

Nice addition to the toolbox Jjay. Enjoy using it.

Looks like my next purchase will be another 70mm crystallisation dish. Mine cracked today. I geuss it was more susceltible to ther.al stress than I though+. I need a replacement 300mm liebig too. Chipped while cleaning.

JJay - 15-10-2018 at 23:00

I don't have a specific use in mind for the second stopcock, but I needed a replacement 250 mL addition funnel, and that one looked fancy. I can see how it could be useful for doing multiple additions to a refluxing vessel. The funnel could also be useful in some inert gas setups.

I'm not sure what my next acquisition is going to be, but that 1 L Dewar condenser looks pretty neat.

j_sum1 - 16-10-2018 at 00:02

Well the advantage in my view is the option to recharge the addition funnel with more reagent without allowing air into the system. The ability top convert a batch process to a kind of pseudo flow process.

DavidJR - 16-10-2018 at 04:41

Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
Well the advantage in my view is the option to recharge the addition funnel with more reagent without allowing air into the system. The ability top convert a batch process to a kind of pseudo flow process.


Or conversely to recharge the funnel without letting large volumes of noxious gases out.

VSEPR_VOID - 16-10-2018 at 05:30

Quote: Originally posted by Morgan  
A jacketed beaker to tinker with ...


Those look expensive

https://www.ebay.com/itm/500ml-Jacketed-Glass-Beaker-Double-...

They might be good for energetic chemistry with cooling and temperature control.

If you put steam through it would maintain a good steam bath, as long as you watch out for a water hammer.

arkoma - 16-10-2018 at 14:51

Stainless steel keck clips!!!!

nimgoldman - 17-10-2018 at 12:01

These distillation adapters so that I can attach more efficient downward-facing condenser. I need this for distilling more volatile products from reaction mixtures, like ether or bromoethane.

Other than that, a bunch of amber glass reagent bottles for more sensitive chemicals like chloroform.

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VSEPR_VOID - 17-10-2018 at 17:26

250 mL 24/40 single neck rbf
Thermometer adapter (glass and Teflon)
3 neck 500 mL 24/40

If I had more money I would buy larger flasks, more gas adapters, and a some micro scale glassware.

TheIdeanator - 17-10-2018 at 20:56

Scored an empty 500 ml bottle from the trash at school. I should ask my prof to save them for me....

Mr. Rogers - 18-10-2018 at 19:28

Quote: Originally posted by TheIdeanator  
Scored an empty 500 ml bottle from the trash at school. I should ask my prof to save them for me....


College dumpsters are the best. I got two IKA hotplate/stirrers with cut cords and fixed them.

I guess they throw the whole unit out if the cord becomes frayed/burnt.

Herr Haber - 19-10-2018 at 02:58

Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Rogers  

I guess they throw the whole unit out if the cord becomes frayed/burnt.


It's probably even sillier than that.
I know a lot of companies cut cords from the (working) computer equipment they replace just for accounting reasons. With the cord, it still has a value, without it it doesnt.

monolithic - 19-10-2018 at 03:37

Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Rogers  
Quote: Originally posted by TheIdeanator  
Scored an empty 500 ml bottle from the trash at school. I should ask my prof to save them for me....


College dumpsters are the best. I got two IKA hotplate/stirrers with cut cords and fixed them.

I guess they throw the whole unit out if the cord becomes frayed/burnt.

It's probably cheaper to order a whole new unit than just a replacement cord from IKA.

Ubya - 19-10-2018 at 03:42

Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Rogers  
Quote: Originally posted by TheIdeanator  
Scored an empty 500 ml bottle from the trash at school. I should ask my prof to save them for me....


College dumpsters are the best. I got two IKA hotplate/stirrers with cut cords and fixed them.

I guess they throw the whole unit out if the cord becomes frayed/burnt.


my chemistry department cleans its labs and offices once or twice a year, we don't have a dumpster, so a truck comes, loads averything they threw (computers, stirrers, I ONCE SAW A ROTOVAP, equipment of every kind) and brings it somewhere (i don't know where...), i wait these rare events to scavenge interesting stuff. i need to find a friend in the department that will let me take freely what i need from the truck while they load it with stuff. i hope to find a rotovap:D

arkoma - 19-10-2018 at 12:20

Quote: Originally posted by nimgoldman  
These distillation adapters so that I can attach more efficient downward-facing condenser. I need this for distilling more volatile products from reaction mixtures, like ether or bromoethane.

Other than that, a bunch of amber glass reagent bottles for more sensitive chemicals like chloroform.


Have the adapter on the right---very good pairing with my Graham condenser

TheIdeanator - 19-10-2018 at 20:02

Quote: Originally posted by Ubya  
Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Rogers  
Quote: Originally posted by TheIdeanator  
Scored an empty 500 ml bottle from the trash at school. I should ask my prof to save them for me....


College dumpsters are the best. I got two IKA hotplate/stirrers with cut cords and fixed them.

I guess they throw the whole unit out if the cord becomes frayed/burnt.


my chemistry department cleans its labs and offices once or twice a year, we don't have a dumpster, so a truck comes, loads averything they threw (computers, stirrers, I ONCE SAW A ROTOVAP, equipment of every kind) and brings it somewhere (i don't know where...), i wait these rare events to scavenge interesting stuff. i need to find a friend in the department that will let me take freely what i need from the truck while they load it with stuff. i hope to find a rotovap:D


I also pinched a bunch of test tubes, some chemicals and more recently than the bottle, a nice old variable power supply in good condition that was on its way out. Most of those were from projects I was on that I'm fairly certain no one will ever use or miss.

Ubya - 14-11-2018 at 00:51

thank you deschem, the foam sarcophagus worked:D

20181114_094654.jpg - 655kB

monolithic - 15-11-2018 at 20:06

I'm trying to piece together a good set of condensers but before I purchase them, I'd like some opinions on how well these more exotic types of condensers work.

Fractional distillation: https://www.ebay.com/itm/300mm-24-40-Distilling-Column-Disti... packed with ceramic Raschig rings
Reflux: https://www.ebay.com/itm/24-40-300mm-Glass-Davies-Condenser-...
Simple distillation: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Liebig-Condenser-24-40-400mm-Jack-l...

Would these condensers be ideal for my listed purpose, and would the Davies condenser also work well for for simple distillation? Also, is the "distilling column" packed with Raschig rings vastly superior to a Vigreux in terms of separation/resolution of fractions, or is it more of a slight improvement?

[Edited on 16-11-2018 by monolithic]

Sulaiman - 16-11-2018 at 05:10

The column looks good;
.without the glass spiral it makes a good air-condenser for high b.p. liquids
.with glass balls as packing I'd expect at least twice as many 'plates' as a similar sized Vigreaux, even more with better packing.
.I have broken two glass spirals so far during cleaning and handling and I'm not aware of a cheap source, so a little diy glass-bending may be required in future.

There is no such thing as a condenser that is too efficient for product collection,
more cooled surface area = better
BUT
A Leibig condenser is adequate for most purposes, is easy to clean and is the most robust construction,
Two Leibig condensers are cheaper than one helical/jacketed/turbulent-flow efficient condenser but give more flexibility.

If only occasional simple distillations are envisioned then one of these may be very convenient
https://www.ebay.com/itm/24-40-Distillation-head-Short-Path-...

There are many choices, generalisations and opinions, even though I do not own one,
a Vigreaux column is probably the best start,

as it will allow you to compare results with others, here and on YouTube for example,.

A still capable of fine fractionation is (I have found) a non-trivial (two years and counting) exercise.
(You may notice how few fine fractionating stills are featured in amateur chemistry videos - with good reason)
The only examples that I could find were all for specifically ethanol :P
(lots to be learned from those guys)

My most efficient condenser was from 'SM Secret Santa' and I've not needed better. It Looks like this https://www.ebay.com/itm/200mm-24-40-Coiled-Reflux-Condenser...

VSEPR_VOID - 16-11-2018 at 07:14

A 5 liter 3-neck 24-40 flask (a big fucking flask)

JJay - 16-11-2018 at 18:34

Quote: Originally posted by VSEPR_VOID  
A 5 liter 3-neck 24-40 flask (a big fucking flask)


I keep thinking about buying one of those, but my biggest flask so far is 3 liters.

I picked up a transfer adapter and a vacuum adapter, pictured here in the aura of their holy power (actually the photo is just overexposed). One of these days I'm going to try making phenylsodium or chromous acetate.

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JJay - 28-11-2018 at 16:40

I got a 1 L Dewar condenser / cold trap.

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RogueRose - 29-11-2018 at 03:40

Quote: Originally posted by JJay  
I got a 1 L Dewar condenser / cold trap.

[/rquote

how much does something like this cost?

JJay - 29-11-2018 at 06:47

I paid $77 with free shipping during a sale. That's a steal, basically; I think right now they are $96.

An equivalent Chemglass condenser would be around $270. I'm not sure that this is quite Chemglass quality, but the quality is excellent.

happyfooddance - 2-1-2019 at 19:11

Just got my christmas present! Various adapters from Dr. Bob. Expertly packed, not a single piece damaged.

So excited to put these pieces to work!

20190102_190604(1).jpg - 1MB

Ubya - 22-1-2019 at 01:49

my claisen adapter arrived. the seller probably messed up and put the wrong price on this listing, but he shipped anyway.
BUT, wrong joint size.... i ordered 24/29 and he sent me 24/40, oh well they can still be compatible even if a bit ugly

Cattura.PNG - 98kB

PyroPlatinum - 22-1-2019 at 14:49

My last one was a jar of jam.

itsafineday - 11-2-2019 at 10:26

Glassware and Gassware

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mayko - 1-3-2019 at 15:58

A lab at work was clearing out some old stuff... I scored a box of Whatman glass-backed TLC plates!

arkoma - 1-3-2019 at 17:05

A set of beakers. Can NEVER have enough beakers.

photochemical reactor

SWIM - 24-6-2019 at 16:35

Picked up an Ace 250 ml photochemical reactor.

The light well is quartz, and jacketed for cooling.
32 mm wide and 350 mm deep.

The tube on the light well that looks broken is smooth and fire polished. It seems to be undamaged, but why it's just a tube on that side whereas the other side has a nifty little Ace-thread fitting on it I have no Idea.

The Ace lamps for these things are very expensive, but I figure I can try one of those UV air duct sterilizer tubes in there or one of those water purifier bulbs.



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[Edited on 25-6-2019 by SWIM]

[Edited on 25-6-2019 by SWIM]

SWIM - 25-6-2019 at 14:31

Today a falling film distillation head.

The last coil is missing from the heated 'finger' but I guess it'll do.

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