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Author: Subject: Sodium Nitrite
Alchemist
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[*] posted on 6-6-2008 at 17:20
Sodium Nitrite


Hello All,

Does anyone know of a GOOD source for Sodium Nitrite and at good price? I thought I had a good price at "Trinity Lab Supply" for 5lb's at $32.14. They just emailed me saying there price went up 60% and credited my credit card back. Boy what a bunch of ass holes. Sorry, but am I really mad!

Thanks to anyone who can help, The Alchemist.....
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Magpie
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[*] posted on 6-6-2008 at 18:17


Have any salmon or steelhead fishing in your area? I see it offered in sporting goods stores to preserve fish eggs. As I recall the price was reasonable. Here's their website: http://www.pro-cure.com/eggcure.html

Speaking of price hikes I just ordered some copper carbonate and vanadium pentoxide. The supplier called to tell me the prices had increased by 20-30% over those listed.

But how is this for an outrageous price: a local drugstore wants $14.50/4 oz of boric acid. The pottery store only wants $0.75 for same. Granted the drugstore's product is likely USP, but this still seems way out of line.

[Edited on 6-6-2008 by Magpie]
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MagicJigPipe
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[*] posted on 6-6-2008 at 18:38


A pharmacy in my area wanted $22 for 400g of NaCl USP!

There is technical grade NaNO2 on eBay for a little less than $8 a pound. The stuff used for food has bright pink dye in it so I would not use it for chemistry.

I would not doubt it if these price hikes correlate to the rise in gas prices. EVERYTHING seems to be going up. Especially groceries.

At least they have leveled out at $3.79/gal for a while. It won't last long, though.




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[*] posted on 7-6-2008 at 10:21
Nitrite


Hello all,

Has anyone ever tried making Nitrites by the electrolysis of nitrates? If so please let me know the details.

Thanks, the Alchemist.....
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[*] posted on 7-6-2008 at 13:01


Nitrites thread:
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=52&...
Separation of NaNO2 and NaNO3:
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=8301&a...
German book on nitrates and nitrites, nitrite production, p. 124-126:
http://books.google.com/books?id=P20JAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA124
Gmelin’s Handbuch (older, inferior incomplete version) on NaNO2:
http://rapidshare.com/files/120832174/Gmelin_kraut_s_Handbuc... p. 303; KNO2; p. 28-29.
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[*] posted on 7-6-2008 at 20:23


Quote:
Originally posted by Alchemist
Hello all,

Has anyone ever tried making Nitrites by the electrolysis of nitrates? If so please let me know the details.

Thanks, the Alchemist.....


Haven't tried it, but on e.g. link 4, p. 303: Reducing a solution of NaNO3 with an amalgated copper cathode gives a yield which is good at first, but this pulls back, and one obtains with a relatively good application of electricity gets a yield of only 60% (Z. Elektrochem. 9, (1903), 955).
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chloric1
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[*] posted on 8-6-2008 at 04:06


Quote:
Originally posted by Schockwave
Haven't tried it, but on e.g. link 4, p. 303: Reducing a solution of NaNO3 with an amalgated copper cathode gives a yield which is good at first, but this pulls back, and one obtains with a relatively good application of electricity gets a yield of only 60% (Z. Elektrochem. 9, (1903), 955).


60% yield is not bad if you can use the IPN method(isopropyl nitrite) to seperate the nitrite. But with food processing sources along with ebay, there really is no need for the extra labor now. But, for academic reasons, I recommend the manipulations based on uncertain future availabilites.




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[*] posted on 8-6-2008 at 23:37


For a much higher yield, the thermal routes are much more advantageous.
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[*] posted on 10-6-2008 at 06:12


Would heating a mixture of elemental hg and a metal nitrate in a closed system afford anything useful? The method with lead seems too expensive if you need a lot of XNO2, both pb and hg oxides are produced by heating the respective metals on oxygen, mercuric oxide could be regenerated simply by heating it and were I live, mercury is readily avaliable at dentistry online shops. (of course both metals are very toxic and the nitrites can't be used as an additive for human consumption!)

[Edited on 10-6-2008 by FreedomFighter]
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[*] posted on 5-7-2008 at 19:48


Copperized zinc at about 600% by weight of the nitrate affords a highly effective,almost quantitative,reduction.My interest in this was generation of dinitrogen trioxide.As sodium nitrite seems unobtainable in Australia I eventually came across calcium nitrite as a 30% solution(cement additive as a corrosion inhibitor)This is easily convertible via sodium carbonate,however I found the reaction of Ca(NO2)2 with 4N HCL provided superior results to traditional NaNO2/H2SO4.
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[*] posted on 6-8-2008 at 00:09


Quote:
Originally posted by Alchemist
Has anyone ever tried making Nitrites by the electrolysis of nitrates? If so please let me know the details.


From the library there's a mention of it on page 34 here
http://www.sciencemadness.org/library/books/the_manufacture_...

.

Attachment: Improvements in Electrolytic Cells GB191325415.pdf (668kB)
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[*] posted on 6-8-2008 at 16:35


See http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/NaNO2.html
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