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Author: Subject: Sal Ammoniac?
mac251
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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 01:28
Sal Ammoniac?


Recently I was reading an older text put on the net, and one of the chemicals listed in it was Sal Ammoniac. I was wondering if anyone had ever come across any text mentioning this or if anyone knew what it was. The text I saw mentioning it was a repro from a 12th century text. Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated. Or if anyone knows of any books or people on the history of Chemistry.
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kaviaari
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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 01:43


Sal Ammoniac is the archaic name of ammonium chloride.

[Edited on 30-6-2008 by kaviaari]
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woelen
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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 02:37


It is called Sel Ammoniac, and not Sal.



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kaviaari
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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 02:45


Most certainly not woelen, just google sel ammoniac. Google preposes sal instead of sel.

[Edited on 30-6-2008 by kaviaari]
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garryb
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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 02:47


Amazing, I am in a position to disagree with woelen!
In England it is certainly sal ammoniac.
No offence woelen - I greatly admire all your work and posts!
Garry.
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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 03:34


Amazingly some people put it in sweets

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium_chloride

If you have a pure sample just try tasting it!
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woelen
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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 05:17


Yes, you seem to be right. I have old German literature, which calls it sel ammoniac, and it seems that in Dutch and French literature it also is called sel ammoniac, but in the part of the world where English is the native language it indeed seems to be sal ammoniac.

My mistake ;)

[Edited on 30-6-08 by woelen]




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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 10:45


I`m kinda hands up guilty in some respects that I sometimes call it by the old name myself, and many other things.

but then I`v seen Muriatic acid used in place of Hydrochloric acid on here, and as such don`t feel so bad ;)

incl the the old names for the Elements.


[Edited on 30-6-2008 by YT2095]




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[*] posted on 30-6-2008 at 12:41


I have an aversion to using terms like "Muriatic" because around here those are the terms that the cooks use ("battery acid", "lye", etc.). If you use those terms you are even more at risk of losing life, limb, and freedom in my area.



"There must be no barriers to freedom of inquiry ... There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors. ... We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it and that the only way to detect it is to be free to inquire. And we know that as long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost, and science can never regress." -J. Robert Oppenheimer
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[*] posted on 1-7-2008 at 03:02


But there are the ones that are truely evocative of a more alchemical age;

Spirits of hartshorn
Butter of tin
Flowers of sulphur
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[*] posted on 1-7-2008 at 06:42


You mustn't forget oil of vitriol, oleum and saltpeter.



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[*] posted on 1-7-2008 at 07:03


And there are white, blue and green vitriols as well as

Sweet Spirits of Nitre
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[*] posted on 15-7-2008 at 21:09


Yup...."SAL" in Canada too, if you buy it as a soldering flux.
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[*] posted on 16-7-2008 at 14:16


also the term 'oil of wintergreen' is still used frequently in chemists these days, (well it is where i live , norfolk):P
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[*] posted on 16-7-2008 at 17:59


Sodium sulphate decahydrate aka Glauber's salt

Sal mirabilis or 'miraculous salt' named for its medicinal properties.
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