Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2  
Author: Subject: Dimethylmercury cold storage?
DoctorOfPhilosophy
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 126
Registered: 12-6-2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Member Is Offline

Mood: avunculicidal

[*] posted on 13-12-2018 at 13:47


Quote: Originally posted by morganbw  
I do not think that a normal school lab (including grad school) would have this. I suspect it would only be in a research lab doing work with metal poisonings or possibly as a standard (CDC level) to test against such.


Well disturbingly anyone with access to ebay could have the topic compound in a few short days.:(
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Dan Vizine
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 612
Registered: 4-4-2014
Location: Tonawanda, New York
Member Is Offline

Mood: High Resistance

[*] posted on 13-12-2018 at 14:23


The story lost ALL credibility the moment he said "I had asked for some mercury but he didn't know what this was"....riiight.




"All Your Children Are Poor Unfortunate Victims of Lies You Believe, a Plague Upon Your Ignorance that Keeps the Youth from the Truth They Deserve"...F. Zappa
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Mr. Rogers
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 151
Registered: 30-10-2017
Location: Ammonia Avenue
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 13-12-2018 at 22:10


It's sketchy to say the least.

Someone who has unsupervised access to a (presumably) university chemical store would be someone with knowledge of the appearance of elemental mercury.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 4419
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Oz
Member Is Offline

Mood: Metastable, and that's good enough.

[*] posted on 13-12-2018 at 22:45


Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Rogers  
It's sketchy to say the least.

Someone who has unsupervised access to a (presumably) university chemical store would be someone with knowledge of the appearance of elemental mercury.


Oh. No doubt it is sketchy. I am not buying the story in its entirity for even a moment. But if the bit related to organomercury is true, then it is a serious situation that can only end badly. If he keeps an ampoule -- it may be years down the track, but eventually someone will have to do something with it. It may or may not still have a legible label and even if it does, it may or may not be recognised by whoever discovers it. It either gets spilled with probable dire consequences or else it is whatever future version of the hazmat squad gets called in. There aren't any real ways this can end prettily.

Trolling is indeed a posibility and maybe even likely. But I have seen enough dumb stuff that I would not be absolutely certain that it is trolling.

Anyway, by now, if the story is in any true, the OP is off on holiday with a little vial of deadly toxin sitting next to the peanut butter. He is not listening. There is a chance we will find out more details in the news. Eventually.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Mr. Rogers
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 151
Registered: 30-10-2017
Location: Ammonia Avenue
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 13-12-2018 at 23:10


Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Rogers  
It's sketchy to say the least.

Someone who has unsupervised access to a (presumably) university chemical store would be someone with knowledge of the appearance of elemental mercury.


Oh. No doubt it is sketchy. I am not buying the story in its entirity for even a moment. But if the bit related to organomercury is true, then it is a serious situation that can only end badly. If he keeps an ampoule -- it may be years down the track, but eventually someone will have to do something with it. It may or may not still have a legible label and even if it does, it may or may not be recognised by whoever discovers it. It either gets spilled with probable dire consequences or else it is whatever future version of the hazmat squad gets called in. There aren't any real ways this can end prettily.

Trolling is indeed a posibility and maybe even likely. But I have seen enough dumb stuff that I would not be absolutely certain that it is trolling.

Anyway, by now, if the story is in any true, the OP is off on holiday with a little vial of deadly toxin sitting next to the peanut butter. He is not listening. There is a chance we will find out more details in the news. Eventually.


I agree. If this is real, the only sane thing to do is call the fire department and explain the whole situation honestly.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
fusso
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1183
Registered: 23-6-2017
Location: Toaru city, Toaru nation, Asia, Earth, ∥ universe
Member Is Offline

Mood: You, a degenerate: OWO Me, an intellectual: tungsten dioxide

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 04:46


Is there anyways to destroy Me2Hg?



Useful sites:
Balance Chemical Equation: http://www.webqc.org/balance.php
Molecular mass and elemental composition calculator: https://www.webqc.org/mmcalc.php
Solubility table: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
It's not crime if noone finds out - Nyaruko
List of materials made by ScienceMadness users:
Remake: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1nmJ8uq-h4IkXPxD5svnT...
Original: https://docs.google.com/document/u/1/d/1AoI2VA5L4bmFw2HwXS2O...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
TheMrbunGee
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 224
Registered: 13-7-2016
Location: EU
Member Is Offline

Mood: Phosphorising

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 07:00


Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Is there anyways to destroy Me2Hg?



Wiki:
The compound reacts with mercuric chloride to give the mixed chloro-methyl compound:

(CH3)2Hg + HgCl2 → 2 CH3HgCl
Whereas dimethylmercury is a volatile liquid, CH3HgCl is a crystalline solid.


this way it would be "safer", but doing anything with it would not be safe..

not sure, maybe replacement reaction could be done, with some more active metal, like zinc.




View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1262
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 10:41


Tidbits
42.2.1 Organic Mercury Poisoning
The earliest known deaths attributed to exposure to organic mercury, involving dimethyl mercury, occurred at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in Smithfield, London in the course of research on the valency of metals and metallic compounds. Details of the research that led to the lethal exposures were reported by Frankland and Duppa(1863); yet, inexplicably, their publication made no mention of the poisoning and deaths of two technicians involved in the research. The two technicians were apparently directly exposed to dimethyl Hg for periods of 3 months and 2 weeks, respectively. According to hospital reports, both men exhibited symptoms associated with ataxia and died 2 weeks and 12 months, respectively, after the onset of symptoms. Clinical details were reported in two internal hospital reports (Edwards1865, 1866), which include the statement, “That the symptoms were due to the inhalation of [mercuric methide] is rendered almost certain.” However, circulation of these reports was limited; Hunter et al. (1940) commented that “The story of these deaths has been handed down verbally from one generation of chemists to another."
http://www.academia.edu/29085604/Mercury_in_Fish_History_Sou...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
fusso
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1183
Registered: 23-6-2017
Location: Toaru city, Toaru nation, Asia, Earth, ∥ universe
Member Is Offline

Mood: You, a degenerate: OWO Me, an intellectual: tungsten dioxide

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 17:06


Seriously, why is this troll thread still here?:mad:

[Edited on 181215 by fusso]




Useful sites:
Balance Chemical Equation: http://www.webqc.org/balance.php
Molecular mass and elemental composition calculator: https://www.webqc.org/mmcalc.php
Solubility table: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
It's not crime if noone finds out - Nyaruko
List of materials made by ScienceMadness users:
Remake: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1nmJ8uq-h4IkXPxD5svnT...
Original: https://docs.google.com/document/u/1/d/1AoI2VA5L4bmFw2HwXS2O...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 4419
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Oz
Member Is Offline

Mood: Metastable, and that's good enough.

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 18:17


Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Seriously, why is this troll thread still here?:mad:

[Edited on 181215 by fusso]

1. We don't know for sure that it is a troll. Definitely stupid. Definitely baiting. But we have no idea how much if any of the story is true. Members are responding well so this is ok.
2. We don't often get to discuss such hazardpus compounds. It is good to be aware of the properties of these kinds of things even if we are unlikely to encounter them. The same as we might discuss ClF3, Pu or some ultra high energy explosives. I don't know how organic mercury might be neutralised. I could hazard a guess, but it would indeed be a hazard if posted. OTOH, it is likely someone knows and can share. I would be knowledgeable for it.


The thread can stay. At least for now.
Maybe the OP will even grow a brain cell while on holiday and revisit.

View user's profile View All Posts By User
AJKOER
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2586
Registered: 7-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 18:40


I believe the sincerity of the author of this thread. It has the incoherent trait of a true story, and ends no less with "Happy holidays and many thanks in advance!!".

In context, I would hazard a guess that at least nine out of the ten people I know have no clue of what Methyl Mercury is! A symptom of a country of awash in scientific ignorance!! So why is it surprising that there's someone totally clueless with access to chemical supplies at a university we're the only supplies they probably lock up are at the sports department, a big revenue generator for the school?

I also suspect that Methyl Mercury is one of those chemicals that is not easy to breakdown without creating more of a highly toxic problem, so you cannot cheaply get rid of it, and so it sits on a shelf where it really does not belong, allowing someone to remove it and ask a friend to help deal with it.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Vomaturge
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 136
Registered: 21-1-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: thermodynamic

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 19:18


Well, I'd assume molecules of dimethyl mercury can be easily made into a variety of less dangerous (albeit not harmless) compounds. Even the wiki page implies that in numerous places. I'd suspect the real issue is making sure there is no unreacted residue left. You can run a reaction which neutralizes most of a sample, but maybe 1% of it might not mix with the neutralizing reagent, or it might all be mixed evenly, but a tiny bit might not get enough activation energy. Now, the waste products will have enough dimethyl mercury left over to be deadly.

That's why I'd rather it stay in its ampoule (assuming the story is true) than be opened for some wreckless procedure that will leave lethal traces all over the place.

I definitely see your point, on why even big research facilities would rather store it than try and neutralize it.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DoctorOfPhilosophy
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 126
Registered: 12-6-2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Member Is Offline

Mood: avunculicidal

[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 21:12


Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  

I also suspect that Methyl Mercury is one of those chemicals that is not easy to breakdown without creating more of a highly toxic problem, so you cannot cheaply get rid of it, and so it sits on a shelf where it really does not belong, allowing someone to remove it and ask a friend to help deal with it.


I don't think it is that difficult to dispose of dimethylmercury through a chemical disposal company. They're just going to run it through an incinerator with other inflammable wastes. In fact, that's what the datasheet from Sigma seems to suggest too:

Quote:
Burn in a chemical incinerator equipped with an afterburner and scrubber but exert extra care in igniting as this material is highly flammable. Offer surplus and non-recyclable solutions to a licensed disposal company. Contact a licensed professional waste disposal service to dispose of this material.


If by some chance, I had a sealed ampule of this substance at home that did not pose an imminent threat of leaking or breaking, I would call a licensed disposal company and that would be the end of it.

And yes, they pick up from individuals (albeit somewhat reluctantly).
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Tsjerk
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1376
Registered: 20-4-2005
Location: Netherlands
Member Is Offline

Mood: Mood

[*] posted on 15-12-2018 at 04:06


Quote: Originally posted by DoctorOfPhilosophy  


Quote:
as this material is highly flammable. Offer surplus and non-recyclable solutions to a licensed disposal company. Contact a licensed professional waste disposal service to dispose of this material.



Oh lovely, the stuff is also flammable, imaging having a dimethyl mercury sample burning somewhere, Ok in an incinerator, not so ok in a lab.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1262
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 15-12-2018 at 05:32


Tests on wildlife ...
"During the same period, top predators of the fish-based food chain in the Florida Everglades also had high tissue Hg levels. Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected on a transect through the Florida Everglades in 1999 were reported by Rumbold et al. (2002) with Hg T mean concentrations (n¼ 28) in liver and tail muscle of 10.4 and 1.2 ppm w/w, respectively. A single Florida panther (Pumaconcolor cori), a critically endangered species in Florida, was found dead in the southern Everglades region with the highest Hg concentration ever reported of 110 ppm w/w in the liver; Hg toxicosis was strongly implicated in its death (Roelkeet al. 1991). Other free-ranging panthers in the same region had mean hair, liver,and muscle concentrations of 56.4, 40.6 and 4.4 ppm Hg T w/w, respectively. Roelkeet al. concluded that Hg T
in panther hair greater than 57.3 ppm fresh weight would indicate toxicosis, and identified an “at risk” threshold value for Hg T in panther hair as greater than 12.57 ppm. All of these panthers were known to be feeding on Hg-contaminated raccoons (Procyon lotor). Raccoons are opportunistic omnivores, but eat largely insects and crustaceans and some fish outside berry season, which peaks in January in the Everglades region. As is the case in fish, Hg in insects is essentially all MeHg (Mason et al. 2000). Roelke et al. (1991) reported a meanvalue of 1.8  1.24 ppm Hg in raccoon muscle tissue in the central Everglade, ..."
http://www.academia.edu/29085604/Mercury_in_Fish_History_Sou...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
AJKOER
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2586
Registered: 7-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 15-12-2018 at 12:11


Actually, if you think placing it in an incinerator is a good solution, first radioactively tag the Methyl Mercury. Then, after it is placed into the atmosphere, falls largely into the oceans, finds it way into the food chain, and your fish is caught, which you bring home and test, and than perhaps one day you can shout, 'I found you again!'

Just a brilliant idea:o , and please don't eat the fish!

By the way, most of the Hg placed into the oceans is the result of burning coal.

[Edited on 15-12-2018 by AJKOER]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
nora_summers
Harmless
*




Posts: 33
Registered: 11-11-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: I am figment of your imagination.

[*] posted on 15-12-2018 at 16:14


Fine. the thread is real.

Please upload a photo of the dimethyl mercury ampule so we can see what condition its in and let you know if there is any immediate danger of leakage/breaking.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Schleimsäure
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 101
Registered: 31-8-2014
Location: good ole Germany
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 16-12-2018 at 18:43


Calm down. It will not cunningly creep out of an ampule and try to kill you. Just don't break the ampules and everything will be fine.

You don't have to call a hazmat team, as some suggested here. Ridiculous. Be very careful with it, I would not want to work with it either. Give it back to the university or store it safely. If it is ampuled I don't think it is necessary to store it in the cold. Put a big fat poison skull on the ampules.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Ubya
National Hazard
****




Posts: 423
Registered: 23-11-2017
Location: Rome-Italy
Member Is Offline

Mood: I'm a maddo scientisto!!!

[*] posted on 17-12-2018 at 00:26


Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  
Actually, if you think placing it in an incinerator is a good solution, first radioactively tag the Methyl Mercury. Then, after it is placed into the atmosphere, falls largely into the oceans, finds it way into the food chain, and your fish is caught, which you bring home and test, and than perhaps one day you can shout, 'I found you again!'

Just a brilliant idea:o , and please don't eat the fish!

By the way, most of the Hg placed into the oceans is the result of burning coal.

[Edited on 15-12-2018 by AJKOER]


who doesn't radio tag dimethyl mercury in his free time? we all do it right?





---------------------------------------------------------------------
feel free to correct my grammar, or any mistakes i make
---------------------------------------------------------------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
MrHomeScientist
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1703
Registered: 24-10-2010
Location: Flerovium
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 17-12-2018 at 08:01


Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  
In context, I would hazard a guess that at least nine out of the ten people I know have no clue of what Methyl Mercury is!

You only know ten people? I guess that doesn't really surprise me.
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
symboom
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 801
Registered: 11-11-2010
Location: Wrongplanet
Member Is Offline

Mood: Doing science while it is still legal since 2010

[*] posted on 17-12-2018 at 11:18


To bad there is no way to convert it to Mercury metal even that process would be dangerous .



Chemistry video Storage
https://www.mediafire.com/folder/kbll6gz9bdb4q/Videos
The State of Mad Science newsletter
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=98577
My open source scratch paper
Pastebin.com/u/symboom
Natures Intellectual Organic Peroxide. >>Ascaridole <<
2020 year of science
Oxone
Used for the production of --> CH2O/Cl2/ClO2/Br2/I2
------------------------------------->>Hydrogen Peroxide <<
Sodium had its fame long enough time for Calcium
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DraconicAcid
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2896
Registered: 1-2-2013
Location: The tiniest college campus ever....
Member Is Offline

Mood: Semi-victorious.

[*] posted on 17-12-2018 at 11:45


Quote: Originally posted by Ubya  

who doesn't radio tag dimethyl mercury in his free time? we all do it right?


Radiotagging mercury isn't something one does with a prepared sample, but he does have a point- burning it puts that mercury in the atmosphere. Nasty, nasty.




Please remember: "Filtrate" is not a verb.
Write up your lab reports the way your instructor wants them, not the way your ex-instructor wants them.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
fusso
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1183
Registered: 23-6-2017
Location: Toaru city, Toaru nation, Asia, Earth, ∥ universe
Member Is Offline

Mood: You, a degenerate: OWO Me, an intellectual: tungsten dioxide

[*] posted on 17-12-2018 at 12:51


Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  
By the way, most of the Hg placed into the oceans is the result of burning coal.

[Edited on 15-12-2018 by AJKOER]
How Hg manages to contaminate the coals?



Useful sites:
Balance Chemical Equation: http://www.webqc.org/balance.php
Molecular mass and elemental composition calculator: https://www.webqc.org/mmcalc.php
Solubility table: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
It's not crime if noone finds out - Nyaruko
List of materials made by ScienceMadness users:
Remake: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1nmJ8uq-h4IkXPxD5svnT...
Original: https://docs.google.com/document/u/1/d/1AoI2VA5L4bmFw2HwXS2O...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DavidJR
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 559
Registered: 1-1-2018
Location: Scotland
Member Is Offline

Mood: Anxious

[*] posted on 17-12-2018 at 14:16


Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  
By the way, most of the Hg placed into the oceans is the result of burning coal.

[Edited on 15-12-2018 by AJKOER]
How Hg manages to contaminate the coals?


It's naturally present in coal, along with lots of other nasties.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1262
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 17-12-2018 at 16:30


Quote: Originally posted by DavidJR  
Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  
By the way, most of the Hg placed into the oceans is the result of burning coal.

[Edited on 15-12-2018 by AJKOER]
How Hg manages to contaminate the coals?


It's naturally present in coal, along with lots of other nasties.


I recall reading the bay where I live in Florida, the level of mercury goes up in the summer due to more rainfall.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  2  

  Go To Top