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Author: Subject: Distilling Apricot kernel oil to yield benzaldehyde
Broken Gears
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[*] posted on 8-11-2008 at 07:42
Distilling Apricot kernel oil to yield benzaldehyde


I was at the local healthshop the other day to buy some herbal tea and I saw a 500 ml bottle of apricot kernel oil. I remember reading about in somewhere in a chemistry book, so I bought it.

After looking a quick search I found the info I was looking for. I the back of a Uncle Fester book was a samll appendix about essential olis. It said:
"Apricot kernel oil consist almost entirely of banzaldehyde.... It should be distiled out under a vacuum, as it oxidizes easily when distilled at normal pressure. Its boiling point at 20 torr is 76 °C"

After boiling for awhile I turned up the heat and raised teh vacuum. I ended at 175 °C at 200 torr and still nothing!

What am I doing wrong?

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[Edited on 8-11-2008 by Broken Gears]
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stoichiometric_steve
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[*] posted on 8-11-2008 at 09:37


I assume YOU did nothing wrong, but Fester is either wrong or what you have is the kernel oil minus the cyanogen glycosides (which provide benzaldehyde).



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[*] posted on 8-11-2008 at 11:19


The bottle of oil says cold pressed cleanse oil with mono/Polyunsaturated fat. The oil have no smell at all.
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[*] posted on 8-11-2008 at 12:20


The "bitter almond" oil obtained by steam distillation of pressed peach/apricot/bitter almond kernels is largely benzaldehyde. It is also much more expensive and less commonly available than the cold pressed oil you have. You can't get benzaldehyde from your oil.



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[*] posted on 9-11-2008 at 03:04


An interesting example of the difference between a fixed oil and an essential oil.
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[*] posted on 26-11-2008 at 14:57


Apricot kernel oil is a fixed oil, very similar to almond oil (or high oleic sunflower, if you only look at the fatty acid pattern and disregard sterols).

The typical fatty acid composition is 3-10% C16:0, l.t 2% C16:1, .5-4% C18:0, 55-70% C18:1, 22-35% C18:2, l.t.1% C18:3, traces of others. Cold pressed it is of yellow to dark yellow color, and has a typical, almondlike odor. Refined oils are colorless to light yellow. Use is mostly in cosmetics.

CAS no. 72869-69-3, EINECS No. 272-046-1

It has nothing to do with "bitter almond oil" etc.
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[*] posted on 26-11-2008 at 15:38


I read that this oil is a common adulterant in almond oil. I wouldn't trust Fester with anything you didn't verify independantly by the way. The only oil that is predominantly benzaldehyde is Oil of Bitter Almond, once the favorite massage oil ... sigh...



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[*] posted on 27-11-2008 at 08:24


Unfortunately Bitter Almond or its oil is illegal to import where I live, because of the toxicity :(

Well I guess Im back at reading the thread "toluene --> benzaldehyde" by frogfot. CycloKnight did bring alot of nice info and pic there. Maybe sort it out and out it in Member Publications? :)

[Edited on 27-11-2008 by Broken Gears]
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[*] posted on 27-11-2008 at 15:59


chemrox,

that is true. Reason is, it is cheaper...

The most "economic" adulterant for almond oil, btw., is high oleic sunflower.
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