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Author: Subject: Best and worst smelling chemicals?
rrkss
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[*] posted on 14-6-2010 at 19:01


Quote: Originally posted by mnick12  
Woah! be careful about sniffing the ethyl bromide, as I have a feeling you do not want that stuff hanging around your DNA!


Wasn't done deliberately, just gota whiff of it while disassembling my apparatus outdoors. Has a very sweet smell.
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[*] posted on 19-6-2010 at 20:20


The best IMO would have to be EGDN, im soo glad it doesnt give me headaches, nitromethane is great too. The worst would have to be SO2, it lingers in my damn mouth for ages when i get a whiff of it!!! Cl2,HCl and HF are bad too, where i used to work we had large tanks of 70%HF and when the tanker would come to fill it up i would always be unpleasantly downwind from it. They had a well stocked lab there, too bad i forgot too ask to buy surplus chems when they laid us all off, but that was the last thing on my mind at the time.
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[*] posted on 20-6-2010 at 10:30


THC has a nice smell if you catch my drift...

In all seriousness, I do like the smell of Methyl Salicylate
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[*] posted on 21-6-2010 at 08:26


After university skunks smell like THC, not the other way around!

Speaking of which my cat got skunked once. She smelled like burning rubber and epoxy resin for a few days. There must be some sort of nitrogen compound as well. At low concentrations it smells like Tim Hortons, which is one of the many reasons I never go there.




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[*] posted on 22-6-2010 at 07:16


I like the smell of benzaldehyde, toluene and of some ethers, but H2S (off course :) ) and CH3COOH are just nasty.
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[*] posted on 22-6-2010 at 21:38


In fairly low concentrations H2S smells lovely.

Always makes me think of good times at Rotorua




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[*] posted on 23-6-2010 at 05:55
I love the smell of ... in my beard in the morning


Science 26 December 1975:
Vol. 190. no. 4221, pp. 1316 - 1318
DOI: 10.1126/science.1239080


Changes in the intensity and pleasantness of human vaginal odors
during the menstrual cycle
RL Doty, M Ford, G Preti, and GR Huggins

Men and women estimated (by the method of magnitude
estimation) the pleasantness and intensity of the odors of vaginal
secretions sampled from consecutive phases of 15 ovulatory
menstrual cycles of four women. On the average, secretions from
preovulatory and ovulatory phases were slightly weaker and less
unpleasant in odor than those from menstrual, early luteal, and
late luteal phases. However, considerable variation in odor
patterns was present across cycles from the same donor, as well
as across cycles from different donors. These results indicate that
human vaginal odors change slightly in both pleasantness and
intensity during the menstrual cycle, but do not support the notion
that such odors are particularly attractive to humans in an in vitro
test situation......


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"Confusion" — A blind lesbian in a fish market.
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[*] posted on 24-6-2010 at 02:55


"Confusion" — A blind lesbian in a fish market - made me laugh really hard. Nice one. A friend of mine who did some work selecting lots of old bottles of amines told me the women are less affected by this kind of work. A natural defence perhaps.


Does anyone likes the smell of indole? It's a really nice, flowery smell at the first whiff, but then quickly fades to a definite "scato" smell.

The best part is that once you smell the pure indole, you can easily find it's smell in certain flowers, that would smell like crap to you. Indole is meant to atract certain insects, and so does the poo...
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[*] posted on 24-6-2010 at 04:05


! like the smell of toluene you must be kidding ? yuk maybe hexane would be mutch nicer
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[*] posted on 8-7-2010 at 07:56


My favourite is probably t-Butyl Alcohol. Wonderful clean, fresh smell. Also like Menthol, Iodoform, Diethyl Oxalate (Smells like mince pies on Christmas Eve) and Cyclopentanone.

Worst are H2Se - Smells like a vegitarians fart.
Also not keen on dithiocarbamates, tetrahydrothiophene other thiols Etc.
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[*] posted on 8-7-2010 at 14:21


My Heaven's this is really too subjective. Toluene, benzene, naphthalene, etc are not unpleasant if LIGHT. However we have the concentration issue.
But I do agree that Butyl Alcohol, Ethel acetate, etc are really nice. Sulfur-oriented products are nasty because of the link to feces.




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[*] posted on 10-7-2010 at 07:54
Violent catarrh


I am not sure catarrh is an odour, however, the smell
of SO2 is described as choking....

This from Watt's 4:904.

Google.com/books has it. Which saved me the trouble of
typing it in from my hard copy.


Tricarbon disulphide C3S2. B. von Lengyel (B. 26, 2960 [1893])
obtained this compound by keeping the vapours of CS2 in an
electric arc between C poles for some hours, filtering off the black
substance formed, allowing the red filtrate to stand over Cu for 6
to 8 days, and evaporating in a current of dry air. C3S2 is a
deep-red liquid, S.G. 1-27389; the vapour, even in minute
quantities, causes violent catarrh ; can be distilled, with partial
change to a black solid, at 60°-70° and reduced pressure ;
insoluble water, but dissolved by EtOH, Et20, CS2, CHC13, or
C6H6. A conc. solution in CS2 deposits a black solid; the same
solid is formed by gently heating the liquid, if heating to
100°-120° is rapid the change is explosive. The black solid is
probably a polymeride. A solution of C3S2 in CS2 reacts with Br to
form C3S2Br6. (For other reactions, v. abstract in C. J. 60 [11],
91 [1894].)
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[*] posted on 10-7-2010 at 08:06


C3S2 would be the sulfur analog of carbon suboxide, O=C=C=C=O. which is the anhydride of maleic acid, from which it can be made. C3O2 is an evil-smelling gas, and is deadly poisonous, at least as much as CO.
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[*] posted on 10-7-2010 at 12:53
Potamines


PTOMAINES. The name ' ptomaines ' was first applied to poisonous
organic bases obtained from dead bodies ([Greek] - a corpse), but
is now usually given to poisonous organic bases formed in the
putrefaction of any kind of animal matter.....>

Watt's Dictionary of Chemistry.
Volume 4, p. 346 & ff.

http://tinyurl.com/278ukcd

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[*] posted on 12-7-2010 at 06:36


It seems logical that nature designed the malodorous power of purification to keep the living FROM the dead. I certainly don't know if purification brings with it an onslaught of disease or poisons (at least to what extent) but the power of that odor is remarkable in it's effectiveness to keep one back & away from it's source!


edit
If you ever get a scan of Watts' Dictionary of Chemistry; please let me know. It looks very worthwhile.



[Edited on 12-7-2010 by quicksilver]




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[*] posted on 12-7-2010 at 07:14


Quote: Originally posted by quicksilver  

If you ever get a scan of Watts' Dictionary of Chemistry; please let me know. It looks very worthwhile.



----------
Google.com/books.com — I know they have one
of the four volumes. I didn't check to see if they
have all 4-volumes (checking my hard copy) 3 290 pages.

Volume 1 & 2 of Mellor's opus are also there, however, me
thinks you are going to have trouble finding volume 2.

If you are an anlogue person like myself you can buy a
reprinted edition, or for a surprisingly low price the
original edition. Given— they lack the extreme advantage
that Google's copy has in being search-able.
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[*] posted on 12-7-2010 at 18:00


Quote: Originally posted by quicksilver  
It seems logical that nature designed the malodorous power of purification to keep the living FROM the dead. I certainly don't know if purification brings with it an onslaught of disease or poisons (at least to what extent) but the power of that odor is remarkable in it's effectiveness to keep one back & away from it's source!



If you don't bury me for the love; you'll bury me for the
stink! Proverb.

Death to Dust: What happens to dead bodies?
Kenneth V. Iserson, M.D.
Galen Press, Ltd, 1994

The first sign of putrefaction is a greenish skin discoloration appearing on the
right lower abdomen about the second or third day after death. This coloration
then spreads over the abdomen, chest and upper thighs and is usually
accompanied by a putrid odor. Both color and smell are produced by sulphur-
containing intestinal gas and a breakdown product of red blood cells. The ancient
Greeks and the Etruscans paid homage to this well recognized stage of
decomposition by each coloring a prominent god aquamarine, considered the
color of rotting flesh.

Bacteria normally residing in the body, especially the colon, play an important
part in digestion of food during life. They also contribute mightily to
decomposition after death-the process of putrefaction. The smell, rather than the
sight, is the most distinctive thing about a putrefying body.

Under normal conditions, the intestinal bacteria in a corpse produce large
amounts of foul-smelling gas that flows into the blood vessels and tissues. It is
this gas that bloats the body, turns the skin from green to purple to black, makes
the tongue and eyes protrude, and often pushes the intestines out though the
vagina and rectum. The gas also causes large amounts of foul-smelling blood
stained fluid to exude from the nose, mouth and other body orifices. Two of the
chemical produced during putrefaction are aptly named putrescine (1,4-
diaminobutane) and cadaverine (1,5-pentanediamine). If a person dies from an
overwhelming bacterial infection, marked changes from putrefaction can occur
within as little as 9 to 12 hours after death.

By seven days after death, most of the body is discolored and giant blood-
tinged putrid blisters begin to appear. the skin loosens and any pressure causes
the top layer to come off in large sheets (skin slip). As the internal organs and
the fatty tissues decay, they produce large quantities of foul-smelling gas. By the
second week after death, the abdomen, scrotum, breasts and tongue swell; the
eyes bulge out. A bloody fluid seeps out the mouth and nose. After three to four
weeks, the hair, nails and teeth loosen and grossly swollen internal organs begin
to rupture and eventually liquefy. The internal organs decompose at different
rates, with the resistant uterus and prostate often intact after twelve months,
giving the pathologist one way to determine an unidentified corpse's sex.

Richard Selzer poetically described the process in Mortal Lessons:

There is to be feast. The rich table has been set. The board groans. The
guests have already arrived, numberless bacteria that had, in life, dwelt in
saprophytic harmony with their host. Their turn now! Charged, they press
against the membrane barriers, break through the new softness, seep
across plains of tissue, devouring, bleaching gas-a gas that puffs eyelids,
cheeks abdomen into bladders of murderous vapor. The slimmest man take
on the bloat of corpulence. Your swollen belly bursts with a ripping sound,
followed by a long mean hiss.

And they are large! Blisters appear upon the skin, enlarge, coalesce,
blast, leaving brownish puddles in the declivities. You are becoming
gravy...Gray sprays of fungus sprout in the resulting marinade, and there
lacks only a mushroom growing from the nose.

-----
By da - the science of what happens to dead bodies is called
taphonomy. The pioneering work on this is —

Johannes Weigelt (1890-1958)
Renzente Wirbeltierleichen und ihre palöbiologische Bedeutung
Leipizig by Verlag von Max Weg (1927)

Recent Vertebrate Carcasses and their Paleobiological Implications
Translated by Judith Schaefer
University of Chicago Press 1989

-----
Wayward Bodies
[Words attributed to unknown British Soldiers 1854/1856.]


Did you ever think when a hearse goes by,
That you may be next to die?

They take you out to the family plot,
And there you wither, decay and rot.

They wrap you up in a bloody sheet,
And then they bury you six-feet deep,.

And all goes well for a week or two,
And then things start to happen to you.

The worms crawl in the worms crawl out,
The ants play pinochle on your snout!

One of the worms that's not so shy,
Crawls in one ear and out one eye.

They call their friends and their friends' friends too,
They'll make a horrid mess of you!

And then your blood turns yellow-green,
And oozes out like whipping cream.
[Spoken] Darn, me with a spoon!

Your eyes fall in your teeth fall out,
Your liver turns to sauerkraut.

So never laugh when a hears goes by,
For you may be the next to die.
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[*] posted on 15-7-2010 at 01:39


I also suspect it was HF;

Quote:
Though not extremely flammable in gaseous form, many dusters use a fluorocarbon which can burn under some conditions, and warn of this on the packaging. The gas is very flammable and can ignite and can cause pulmonary failure, which can be fatal. When inverted to spray liquid, the boiling fluorocarbon aerosol is easily ignitable, producing a very large blast of flame and extremely toxic hydrogen fluoride as a combustion product.


I like this topic and will be reviewing it at a later date, as I've had a fascination with smelling and tasting things people think are odd.

My favourites for now would have to be Iodine and Vitamin C, assuming it's supposed to smell the way my container of it does. Glacial acid is also nice, from a distance. And, of coarse, petrol and epoxy glue.
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[*] posted on 15-7-2010 at 05:24


Since water has some vapor pressure at STP, I wander if aliens from a non-water rich planet could smell it. If they could what would it smell similar too?

LOL unanswerable questions.




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[*] posted on 18-7-2010 at 07:37
Post 9/11


I find myself living in Central New York where I am daily
reminded that the smell of even the largest barnyard in August
is perfume compared to that which arose from the smoldering
remains of the Twin Towers after the homicidal 9/11 attack.
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[*] posted on 20-7-2010 at 01:04


Heh, a couple of you guys noted acetone, methanethiol, chlorine and H2S as some of the worst smells you've ever come upon. However, all four of these I actually rather like in mild concentrations..I absolutely love the smell of acetone, chlorine smells rather sweet as well unless it becomes overpowering.

I had the pleasure of smelling H2S one time in New Mexico at a hotel..there was an oil pump in the desert behind the place and I went to check it out (I wanted to study how it worked.) Apparently natural H2S is released in the process, and as I got close I began to catch whiffs of the gas. The funny thing was, that although it was a rather smelly compound I rather enjoyed it in low concentrations and after leaving the perimeter had a desire to go back and smell it some more (yes I know it is toxic.) There were signs all over the fence warning of the hydrogen sulfide saying not to light a match etc. lol.

As far as methanethiol, I believe that is what I obtained by burning a small amount of DMSO. Again, although it has a very overpowering stench to it, in lower concentrations I rather like the way it smelled.

Some of the worst things I've smelled...trying to boil all the water out of car-battery acid once (when I was much younger) really stunk up the house. The smell of pennies on my hand I find repulsive..wish I knew what caused that. Formaldehyde is nasty to me and formic acid is repulsive!

I haven't had the pleasure of smelling heliotropin (that I know of) yet, benzaldehyde and vanillin both smell great but zingerone (or well ginger in general) is one of my most craved smells..I could smell that all day! Cinnamaldehyde is up there too..but not as high as zingerone.

[Edited on 20-7-2010 by Rattata2]
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[*] posted on 20-7-2010 at 01:44


I wonder what the isomers of NH2-(C5H3N)-SH (aminopyridinethiol), NH2-(C5H2N)(SH)2 (aminopyridinedithiol), and NH2-(C5H3N)-SeH (aminopyridineselenol) would smell like, if they could be synthesized? Absolutely terrible, I'm sure.
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[*] posted on 20-7-2010 at 06:53


Quote: Originally posted by Formatik  
The worst smelling set of chemicals I've ever smelled occurred after ingesting a concentrated soup of asparagus, and then peeing it out. It smelled much worse than a landfill.



-----------
Reference attached.

Occurrence of S-Methy Thioesters in Urines of Humans
After They Have Eaten Asparagus

Attachment: Asparagus Science.pdf (506kB)
This file has been downloaded 567 times

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[*] posted on 20-7-2010 at 07:31




Uno-el-Garlic-Soupo.jpg - 781kB
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[*] posted on 24-7-2010 at 21:51


Alkyl tin compounds are some of the more awful smelling compounds from my experience. Tetraethyl tin, tributyl tin chloride and allytin tributyl tin smell like rotting garbage.



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