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Author: Subject: Fuck "Pyrex"
grndpndr
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[*] posted on 8-5-2009 at 12:22


Sauron

For your own safety do not buy dodgy eBay glassware

[/rquote] Id assumed if labeled/advertised borosilicate glass
Id be safe.Im contemplating buying a distilling apparatus.1000ml flask ,200-300 ml condenser,500ml RB flask ,connectors and adapter for included thermometer @
around $125 +/- given the specific distributor.I assume its chinese borosolicate but I havent had any problem with my budget driven purchases of chinese borosilicate no name glassware OT a seperatory funnels poor QC of valve dimensions.Specific brand names I should look for?I see also on e-bay higher priced equivalents (quantitatively) for About$300 +.As I intend to use the equipment for corrosive liquids Im not looking forward to glassware failures.

As i mentioned ive been using chinex borosilicate glassware without incident given proper precautions same with coffee pots withstanding rapid temp change.Also canning jars seem to stand up well with a bit of restraint.
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DJF90
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[*] posted on 8-5-2009 at 12:50


Go for Quickfit if you're UK (or generally Europe?), or Ace, Pyrex or Corning for the US.
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grndpndr
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[*] posted on 9-5-2009 at 06:30


Most equipment that catches my eye pricewise doesnt advertise a maker(simply borosilicate glassware) however I have found a few lab supply companys that will either name the glassware or lose a sale.
Thanks for the names of reliable companys.

Ive located the name of that chin glassware although Im sure it floats around under several brand names,Bomex.
BOrosilicate/pyrEX.power of suggestion?Although honestly it hasnt failed using proper lab precautions over several years
other than normal accidents/carelessness

[Edited on 9-5-2009 by grndpndr]
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MadHatter
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[*] posted on 9-5-2009 at 12:41
Pyrex


I had a so-called Pyrex casserole dish made by Anchor Hocking explode on me.
Strangely, I have older(dark brown tinted) glass cookware that have no labels but
never gave me a problem under any circumstances. As for lab glass, use Bomex only
for applications that don't involve heat.




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497
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[*] posted on 9-5-2009 at 13:24


I have a 1000ml Bomex Erlenmeyer which I use regularly to boil down H2SO4. It gets heated to 300*C for long periods of time directly over a propane flame... I've probably used it 30 times for that purpose, never had a problem. So am I just lucky?
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watson.fawkes
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[*] posted on 9-5-2009 at 14:10


Bomex is a borosilicate glass: http://www.tzbomex.com/en/xn.htm.
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grndpndr
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[*] posted on 10-5-2009 at 14:56


I generally use a hotplate and screen arrangement but for the same purpose and worse w/o incident .As I say the only losses have been thru carelessness,so far.
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[*] posted on 10-5-2009 at 15:15
nothing lasts forever


the best in borosilicate still has to conform to the laws of physics.

a crack or chip almost invisible can cause catastrophic results.

also one should use a diffusion type of layering even when using a supposedly safe source of heat - like the corning ceramic surfaces.

and in closing nothing lasts forever and even corning-- both glass and other things have a finite lifetime.

i jusst lost a 10 x 10 inch corning combo stirrer/hotplace. the ceramic top fractured into about a dozen large pieces.




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grndpndr
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[*] posted on 10-5-2009 at 16:31


Of course something with obvious flaws even scratches can be suspect and I always use the approach you describe either a screen on a hotplate,I personally think oilbaths are dangerous themselves but Ill use a sandbath etc.but I never expose my glass to a direct heat source and try to protect myself more than my glassware.Particularly not to forget your lungs.Glassware can be replaced, lung,cornea,and skin grafts/ transplants not so easy.Im sure yor all aware of the danger but if it causes a bulletproof youngster to consider the implications its the best contribution I could make.Just because it doesnt kill outright or cause a hospital visit doesnt mean the damage isnt cumulative.Just take care like you would with any dangerous equipment etc.Dangers that are common knowledge now werent when I was a youngster many are just know paying the price.Rant exhausted.




[Edited on 11-5-2009 by grndpndr]
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[*] posted on 18-5-2009 at 13:33


Well I have to vent here as well I just got some brand new flasks today including some expensive two neck flasks. Well I was washing them out and set them upside down to dry when one tipped over and shattered! I can't believe it. It just falls over and breaks! Come on this is ridiculous I mean falling off a table okay but just rolling over? It's a complete joke now I am on the phone with glass companies trying to get it repaired because there is no such thing as a "warranty" with glassware... Even then they say it could cost more than the flask is worth to repair it!! Aghhhh!!!! So annoying basically $66 + SH just went down the drain...
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[*] posted on 20-5-2009 at 09:14
Simax glassware, from Czech Republic


Hello Folks,

Looks like some are having a 'smashin' time eh :P

Just wondering what you's think of Simax wear (make in the Czech Republic).
See ebay here.

or is a case of Fuck Simax.

Dann2
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Lambda-Eyde
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[*] posted on 20-5-2009 at 09:52


Most of my glassware (except for the ground glass) is Simax brand, but I haven't used it much, so I can't really tell much about its quality.
From what I can see though, the beakers and flasks appear very sturdy with nice markings.

An interesting sidenote: I saw a 50l Chemglass 3-neck jacketed flask with a bottom drain on eBay - which also had the Simax logo on it!
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dann2
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[*] posted on 20-5-2009 at 15:06


Hello,
For the (perhaps) dodgey 'Pyrex' home cook glasswear a test could be done whereby the vessel is put into an oven and heated to 200&degC, taken out, and thrown into a large bucket of cold water.
Would that sort the bad stuff from the proper Pyrex glasswear?
Dann2
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[*] posted on 20-5-2009 at 15:24


Well the fact that crappy glass would never survive this might conclude something, still would you really boil liquid in it that boils beyond 300 degrees, i certainly would feel unconfortable.
Well even though pyrex might be sucky, I still use some glass in my lab that isnt boro or anything similar , I just dont stress it as much as the stuff i know it can deal with it.
Also i would never use old glassware for scary operations.
Its just a matter of thinking before doing.




What a fine day for chemistry this is.
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Formatik
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[*] posted on 20-5-2009 at 16:14


Quote: Originally posted by dann2  
Hello,
For the (perhaps) dodgey 'Pyrex' home cook glasswear a test could be done whereby the vessel is put into an oven and heated to 200&degC, taken out, and thrown into a large bucket of cold water.
Would that sort the bad stuff from the proper Pyrex glasswear?
Dann2


I would expect most glass to break under that condition. I was heating a 1L flask some time ago (Schott glass mind you, though several years old) on a hot plate (it reaches around 500 deg. and above), and just after removing the flask and setting it on a surface (not cold, but cooler than the hot part) and it cracked immediatley. The heat resistance of household glassware depends on its designated use (borosilicate glass tea containers) or glass pots for heating food on the stove. Compared to bakeware like Pyrex I would expect those to be much more thermally stable.

Here is a statement about Pyrex glassware from their website:

Quote:
Avoid Sudden Temperature Changes to your Glassware. To avoid the risk of breakage due to a sudden temperature change to your Pyrex glassware, DO NOT add liquid to hot glassware, place hot glassware on a wet or cool surface, or handle hot glassware with a wet towel, wet potholder or other wet cloth. ....

DO NOT Use On or Under a Flame or Other Direct Heat Source, including on a stovetop, under a broiler, on a grill or in a toaster oven.


http://www.pyrexware.com/index.asp?pageId=104

[Edited on 21-5-2009 by Formatik]
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dann2
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[*] posted on 21-5-2009 at 07:19


Hello,

Some info. here regarding Simax glass.

Dann2
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CHRIS25
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 11:34
Not all Pyrex is made from Borosilicate


I was thinking (for the time being) to use a pyrex jug for one of my reactions which is exothermic. But upon doing some instinctive research I was horrified to read that the company who took over Pyrex (World Kitchen) use hardened soda lime and still call this pyrex.

As I have researched and found that hardened soda lime is well... harder than standard soda lime glass. But the fact remains that it seems I would not be able to trust a cookware jug with the pyrex label, because it is not really the borosillicate composition.

Is all this true. Only asking because I do not have any chemistry beakers at this moment and for a small reaction I thought that buying a pyrex jug would be ideal just for the moment.




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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 12:35


Quote:
I thought that buying a pyrex jug would be ideal just for the moment.

Today's pyrex jugs are made of tempered soda-lime and won't withstand sudden changes in temperature as borosilicate will . . .
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 12:38


Pyrex still only uses borosilicate glass for their labglass line but all of their cookware has changed over to the hardened soda lime/"tempered" glass for some unknown reason. all I know of are rumors as to why they did that( so sadly I cannot offer concrete reasoning other than I have confirmed the cookware isn't the usual borosilicate) but if you buy their flasks, beakers and other labware then you can rest easy.
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watson.fawkes
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 15:02


Quote: Originally posted by Funkerman23  
Pyrex still only uses [...]
The phrase "Pyrex uses" is nonsense. Pyrex is a brand name, not a company. The original trademark was owned by Corning. Corning sold off the rights to the brand name for retail cookware sold in the US a few year ago. At the time, they hadn't done so for all global markets, though I don't know what the status is for that now. Corning still sells labware with the Pyrex name.
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 17:37


When World Kitchen took over the Pyrex brand, it started making more products out of prestressed soda-lime glass instead of borosilicate. This was done to save money, lower prices, and to cut down on manufacturing costs. The soda lime they use now is pre-stressed from the inside, although when you heat it, it still expands like regular soda lime glass would. It wont shatter immediately, but it can only expand up to a point until the inner-stress is too strong.
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[*] posted on 30-4-2012 at 06:41


thanks Fossil, off to order some proper glass now!!!



‘Calcination… is such a Separation of Bodies by Fire, as makes ‘em easily reducible into Powder; and for that reason ‘tis call’d by some Chymical Pulverization.’ (John Friend, Chymical Lectures London, 1712)

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[*] posted on 30-4-2012 at 13:06


Good! I almost made the same mistake once, nearly used a 1 liter pyrex measuring cup for a high temperature oil bath. Good thing I didn't, would have been quite the mess!
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[*] posted on 2-5-2012 at 13:50


Just blew up a process when heating (luckily powder form) stuff by using the flat PYREX jug. The heating was likely OK, but when I took it off, the bottom fell off. For 4 years have had 4 of these items and I managed to crack all of them in normal processes, but got my money back from the shop.
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 17:01


Thats crazy! how do they pass off pyrex as hardened soda lime!?
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