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Author: Subject: Cyclone Dust Remover - Build your own Cyclone Dust Remover
Lambda
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[*] posted on 12-2-2010 at 10:51
Cyclone Dust Remover - Build your own Cyclone Dust Remover


Cyclone Dust Remover - Build your own Cyclone Dust Remover





Marco's Cyclone (aka The Nordic Sucker):
http://www.elisanet.fi/dncmrc/cyclone.htm

Note:

The Links that were give to Bill Pentz's OLD Website Cyclone Index (http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm) and Pages, are NOT working anymore !

Bill Pentz has a NEW Website !!:
http://www.billpentz.com/

And the Cyclone Index Page Link can now be found Here:
http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm

Introduction:

I have always been bored about having my little shop permanently dusted from occasional use of power tools (usually sanding or sawing). In summer it is usually viable to move outdoors the table saw (!) but if it's raining or snowing it's just a mess.

It was autumn 2003 and my renovation project was complete. I was left with a wood dust collector that had been great to pump building dust outdoors but was a poor performer with its original filter bag (see Dust management for do-it-yourself building: http://www.elisanet.fi/dncmrc/dust.htm). It simply let all the fine dust through, namely the most dangerous one for my lungs.

After reading a lot on the Internet, especially Bill Pentz pages (which I kindly recommend: http://www.billpentz.com/) I understood that even a better (read pricey) bag wouldn't have helped. I decided to modify my basic dust collector by adding a cyclone at its intake and a cartridge filter at its exhaust. The cyclone would capture all solid particles and coarse dust, the impeller would pump only almost-clean air and the cartridge filter would retain the finest dust.

I don't have my shop in a two-car garage, with several woodworking tools scattered all around: my shop is only some 12 m2. Two meters of flexible suction hose were enough for me and I was confident that my 550 W dust collector was up to the task.

Cyclone links:

Bill Pentz Personal Web Pages - Home:
http://www.billpentz.com/

Bill Pentz Cyclone Index Page:
http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm

Steve Cater's Cyclone Project:
http://billpentz.com/woodworking/Cyclone/Steve%20Cater%20Cyc...
http://web.ripnet.com/~scater/Cyclone.htm

Lambda

[Edited on 13-2-2010 by Lambda]
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watson.fawkes
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[*] posted on 12-2-2010 at 11:56


Quote: Originally posted by Lambda  
Bill Pentz Personal Web Pages - Home:
http://www.billpentz.com/
I can second the recommendation for this site. It's quite good about ventilation. The only thing to be careful of is that dust collection requires a minimum duct velocity (a linear measure) to keep particles suspended, whereas a fume hood seeks a target face velocity at the hood, which translates to a volumetric measure of air flow. That difference in goals aside, most of the other issues are in common.
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Lambda
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[*] posted on 12-2-2010 at 19:39


Bill Pentz has indeed done some very exhaustive work on Cyclone Designing, and a pretty good job in presenting his efforts on his Website too.

Bill Pentz Personal Web Pages - Home:
http://www.billpentz.com/

Bill Pentz Cyclone Index Page:
http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm


Quote: Originally posted by watson.fawkes  

... The only thing to be careful of is that dust collection requires a minimum duct velocity (a linear measure) to keep particles suspended, whereas a fume hood seeks a target face velocity at the hood, which translates to a volumetric measure of air flow. That difference in goals aside, most of the other issues are in common.


And in order to obtain maximum efficiency above those minimum duct velocity conditions, the following Article addresses;

Operating Cyclones at the proper entrance velocity is important to maximize their dust collection efficiency and because fan motors pushing air through cyclones consume a significant portion of the energy used by a modern cotton gin.

Obtained from: http://www.cotton.org

Entrance Velocity Optimization for Modified Dust Cyclones - By Paul A. Funk, S. Ed Hughs & Greg A. Holt (JCS04-178).pdf

http://www.cotton.org/journal/2000-04/3/upload/jcs04-178.pdf

Lambda
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