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Author: Subject: Looking for book reccomendation
bdgackle
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[*] posted on 25-3-2010 at 08:08
Looking for book reccomendation


By way of background, I'm an engineer, recently developed a fascination with the more practical aspects of chemistry, trying to learn more about it. Got some of the theoretical variety in college, but nothing I could actually DO anything with.

I worked through Kevin Dunn's "Caveman Chemistry" book, and am looking for something a little deeper on inorganic chemistry -- basically to get some more technical information on several of the topics he covered.

I see what look like several good books on the subject in the site library... but as the library says, it has 50k pages of reading to offer. I'm trying to narrow the field a bit.

Can anyone here recommend one of the books in the library here, or perhaps available via archive.org or google books that they would recommend as better than the others to start? Are there a couple of commonly read "classics" I could focus on?

I'd prefer to stick to stuff available electronically, as a lot of my down time happens on airplanes, so I want a format I can conveniently carry.
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DJF90
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[*] posted on 25-3-2010 at 09:06


So you're after practical inorganic chemistry? If this is the case, I would suggest Brauer's "Handbook of Preparative Inorganic Chemistry", which I am almost certain is available in the forum library. If you're just after some more (albeit deeper) theory, then perhaps something like Shriver & Atkin's "Inorganic Chemistry" would be better suited. Of course there are many books out there; you just have to find one that suits your tastes.
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[*] posted on 25-3-2010 at 09:34


If you liked Caveman Chemistry, I heartily recommend James Sherridan Muspratt's Chemistry, Theoretical, Practical, and Analytical as Applied and Relating to Arts and Manufactures.

Volume 1 is on archive.org. My very first book digitization project was to scan both volumes. I no longer have them online because, my scanning choices being very poor on that first project, the page images are large in file size yet hard to read. The theoretical insights in this work should be taken with more than a grain of salt. The practical information is fascinating. There are many illustrations and descriptions of mid-19th century chemical processes. Before I read this and other books from the same era I'd had no idea that practical chemistry was so well developed at the time despite the paucity of theory. The brief historical sketches I'd seen many times in general chemistry textbooks gave the impression that not much of note happened in chemistry between the time of Lavoisier and Mendelev.




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bdgackle
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[*] posted on 25-3-2010 at 09:48


Thank you very much for the replies. Sounds like I will start with Brauer and Muspratt.

I'm interested in learning enough theory to understand, explain, and quantify what I see; however, it's the practical aspects that have drawn me to chemistry as a hobby.

There is a certain sense of power to be gained, I think, with being able to create something from very simple materials. Takes the "magic" out of many of the consumer goods I see on the shelf. Becoming aware that a few large scale processes drive much of our global economy is also deeply interesting to me.

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entropy51
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[*] posted on 25-3-2010 at 14:38


If you're looking for mostly experiments with a little theory, my recommendation would be Chemistry in the Laboratory
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JohnWW
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[*] posted on 25-3-2010 at 18:38


Quote: Originally posted by entropy51  
If you're looking for mostly experiments with a little theory, my recommendation would be Chemistry in the Laboratory
The full URLs are:
http://ia331338.us.archive.org/3/items/collegechemistry03289... 28.8 Mb
and
http://ia331338.us.archive.org/3/items/collegechemistry03289... 24.8 Mb
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bdgackle
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[*] posted on 26-3-2010 at 06:24


So I skimmed a good chunk of Brauer last night. Definately a great resource, and I am sure I will be referring to it in the future. When I read instructions for a process, however, my mind immediately asks "where did the precursers come from?". This is less practical than academic curiosity -- I don't think I'd feel any differently if I could buy reagents at Walmart. Muspratt is next on the agenda... perhaps more luck there.

I've also run into a series called "Manuals of Chemical Technology". Main author for most of them is Geoffrey Martin.

As far as I can tell, there were six in the series, but I can only find full texts for three. The books were:

1) Coal-tar and Dye Stuffs (Can't find)
2) Rare Earth Industry (Found)
3) Industrial Nitrogen Compounds (Found - Big suprise, right?)
4) Chlorine and Chlorine Products (Found)
5) Sulphur and sulphuric acid (Can't find)
6) Salt/Alkalai industry (Can't find)

I'm especially interested to find number 5, but would like to finish out the series. Google books seems to know about all of them, but doesn't have texts for some. Is there some kind of copyright weirdness going on here? I'd be interested to see if anyone with more knowledge than me has read any of these, and what your thoughts are. Of course, if you know where to locate them (physically or electronically) that would be cool too. If I can get my hands on a physical copy perhaps I could recipricate by scanning it for the rest of the community.

I think my main area of interest is understanding how we get from truly raw materials to something more refined and useful. I've always had an interest in how I can influence my environment -- that's how I ended up as an engnieer. Now, if I put down the screwdriver and pick up a test tube, what can I do with the stuff around me?

The first thing I intend to play with is mineral acid creation -- the supheric/nitric acid threads on this board are what drew me here first. This line of inquery has a useful and practical application for this community, given the current political climate; however, that is not my main motivation.
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[*] posted on 15-4-2010 at 12:46


Couple of my favorites:

http://books.google.com/books?id=89w4kyQqQXcC&printsec=f...

I bought a copy of this on ebay for less than 10 bucks and it covers the practical aspects of laboratory work like like how to properly remove a chemical from a bottle - so that's why the caps are hollow!! Or the glory and wonder that is tygon tubing.

And don't pay for anything you can get for free - lots of handy books at scribd and google.

http://www.amazon.com/Organic-Chem-Lab-Survival-Manual/dp/04...
I downloaded a version of this one, it got me through my first distillation and vacuum distillation setup.

Suzee

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Vanilla47
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[*] posted on 27-9-2010 at 21:06
Some Laboratory Manuals


Some Laboratory Manuals would be usefull for a beginner
here are a PDF
http://vanilla47.com/PDFs/ClandestineChemistry/General/Labor...




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zed
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[*] posted on 1-10-2010 at 18:25


Come out from behind that strap-on, Hoveland. We know it's you.

[Edited on 2-10-2010 by zed]
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