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Author: Subject: Rusty ball thermit
Pumukli
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[*] posted on 28-1-2019 at 10:13
Rusty ball thermit


I've found this interesting thermit demonstration experiment and uploaded it here for your entertainment. :)
(I was searching "aluminum foil activation" on the net while came across this gem.)

Just read it and try - if you have the balls. :D

And please report back!

Attachment: rustyballthermite.pdf (155kB)
This file has been downloaded 79 times

[Edited on 28-1-2019 by Pumukli]
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DraconicAcid
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[*] posted on 28-1-2019 at 21:16


I do that all the time for my students. I went to the metal scrap people and asked them if they had any tekk bearings- they are just the right size.



Please remember: "Filtrate" is not a verb.
Write up your lab reports the way your instructor wants them, not the way your ex-instructor wants them.
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wg48
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 01:37


I once found some reels of old magnetic tape. I assumed it was coated with a magnetic oxide perhaps an iron oxide. Using pieces of the tape and aluminium foil I made a thick sandwich of alternative sheets of the tape and foil. I then heated the sandwich slowly hoping to volatilise the plastic of the tape and leave a thermite mixture that would ignite when it was hot enough. It never did ignite but while it was being heated strongly it made a succession of pops and crackes which I assumed were small areas of aluminium and oxide that reacted explosively.

I guess the pops and cracks could also have been the sudden release of trapped gases from the decomposition of the plastic.




Borosilicate glass:
Good temperature resistance and good thermal shock resistance but finite.
For normal, standard service typically 200-230°C, for short-term (minutes) service max 400°C
Maximum thermal shock resistance is 160°C
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FeedMe94
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 01:56


Awesome idea , i will give it a try. A friend of mine have some old rusty cannon balls , solid iron
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Ubya
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 02:54


myst32YT showed it 9 years ago. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqXP-yUT_zI




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FeedMe94
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 08:35


A bit off topic but i will give it a go if you dont mind :)
Here where i live , the older guys , every easter make a white paste and use to cover big round pebbles from the beach. Then they throw it to a downslope and the pebble exploding everytime it hits the road. Any idea what this is ?
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