Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2
Author: Subject: Removal of Oxygen & Carbon Dioxide from Air (Glovebox Design)
careysub
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1339
Registered: 4-8-2014
Location: Coastal Sage Scrub Biome
Member Is Offline

Mood: Lowest quantum state

[*] posted on 14-3-2015 at 17:25


Quote: Originally posted by Sulaiman  
Would the use of a vacuum pump to remove (almost) all of the air be viable?
Once the initial cost is overcome, the running costs would be negligible.
Such a glove box/fume cupboard may also be useful for distillations etc. ?
A possible means of justifying the cost of a vacuum pump with traps ? :)
(you know that you want one!)

[Edited on 14-3-2015 by Sulaiman]


If you built a vacuum tight box that can withstand air pressure, then probably yes. But that is likely an expensive project in itself. You would need to have pressure seals over the arm holes while pumping down.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
WGTR
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 965
Registered: 29-9-2013
Location: Online
Member Is Offline

Mood: Outline

[*] posted on 14-3-2015 at 18:08


Quote: Originally posted by Sulaiman  
Would the use of a vacuum pump to remove (almost) all of the air be viable?
Once the initial cost is overcome, the running costs would be negligible.
Such a glove box/fume cupboard may also be useful for distillations etc. ?
A possible means of justifying the cost of a vacuum pump with traps ? :)
(you know that you want one!)

[Edited on 14-3-2015 by Sulaiman]


As a point of reference, this product:
http://www.mtixtl.com/desktopstainlesssteelvacuumglovebox24x...
does what you are talking about. It's a fairly easy way to get an inert environment without using several bottles of gas to prepare the glove box. Just simply pull a vacuum, and then back-fill the box with a few cubic feet of gas from your favorite supplier.

As an aside, I'm currently running an experiment under vacuum in a vacuum chamber. If things are planned out well, the sample can be heated, stirred, have wires hooked up to it, etc. An aluminum vacuum chamber can be heated directly on a hot plate. Most times, a stir bar will stir inside the chamber, even though eddy currents will slow it down somewhat. Very thin enameled wires can be run over the lid's o-rings without compromising the vacuum. The enameled wire is tough enough that the wires will not short to the aluminum chamber.

As a bit of comic relief, the link I referred to has this in the specifications:

Max. Vacuum Level: 0.5 Torr
Note: Stainless Steel case may deform at higher vacuum level

Unless I'm missing something, it would make more sense to specify the maximum external pressure (760 Torr etc.).
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  2

  Go To Top