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Endimion17
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[*] posted on 29-3-2012 at 05:58


Quote: Originally posted by Dennis SK  
They wasn't cheap thats for sure.
But alkali metals have always been some of my favorite elements. So naturally I looked for the best samples I could possibly find.
It took 5 years and so many inspections of Rb/Cs ampoules.
Trust me, depending on source its relatively easy to find clean samples of Rb/Cs in ampoules below 10 gram. But to find large clean, particle free samples above 10g of especially Cs... Good luck! :)

For info the purity are the following:
Rb, Certified 99,95% minimum. But possibly even more pure.
Cs, Certified 99,99% minumim.

Glad you guys like the pictures. Once I get a better camera I will take high-end pictures.


[Edited on 25-3-2012 by Dennis SK]


Your camera is perfectly fine. You just need to take an artistic approach. Some black cloth for the background and a diffused light source, together with photography rules should do the trick. :)




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Dennis SK
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[*] posted on 29-3-2012 at 12:37


Quote: Originally posted by Endimion17  

Your camera is perfectly fine. You just need to take an artistic approach. Some black cloth for the background and a diffused light source, together with photography rules should do the trick. :)


That "Camera" is actually a mobile phone camera ;)
I didnt think much of artistics when I took the pictures. I just melted the Rb/Cs, thought it looked really nice and tried to catch it.

I have a friend who work as photographer. He has a "photo box" or a "light diffuser box" I think its called. He will help me take very good pictures. Those pictures will also be used instead of some of my current wikipedia pictures.

Really looking forward to show even better pictures of completely oxide free Rb/Cs. Of course, one can only see the true beauty "In real life"
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dann2
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[*] posted on 29-3-2012 at 15:39


There are some mighty pretty pictures here.
Two Sodium Perchlorate shards.
They are the same shard. One was photographed with a polarizing filter on camera.

What colour is Cobalt Perchlorate anyone know?

two_shards.jpg - 252kB

[Edited on 29-3-2012 by dann2]

Attachment: shards in cell.zip (337kB)
This file has been downloaded 287 times

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barley81
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[*] posted on 29-3-2012 at 16:05


Most cobalt (II) salts are red-purplish. Cobalt (II) perchlorate is likely to be similar in color to the nitrate or sulfate.

Such a large shard of a single salt! Isn't it really fragile? How did you make a crystal like that?
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dann2
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[*] posted on 30-3-2012 at 12:57



A saturated solution (3.8 liters) of Sodium Perchlorate was cooled from 50°C to around 10°C and lots of shards formed (see zip attached to last post).
The shards are perhaps two mm thick and not that delicate. If you were to let them fall on a hard surface they would break.
There are more shards in the thread "More on PbO2 Anodes" stuck to an LD Anode.

I have some Barium Perchlorate and Cobalt Sulphate. I might try making some Cobalt Perchlorate by adding the the two together. Ba Sulphate will ppt as it is insoluble leaving me with a solution of Co Perchlorate.
Dann2
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ItalianChemist
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[*] posted on 1-4-2012 at 02:18


Chemiluminescence of Ru(bipy)3(BF4)2


DSC00005 copia.JPG - 73kB
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Satan
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[*] posted on 1-4-2012 at 11:18


Quote: Originally posted by ItalianChemist  
Chemiluminescence of Ru(bipy)3(BF4)2




Did you make a OLED with this complex?
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 1-4-2012 at 12:24


@ItalianChemist, that picture is impressive! How did you take it? I avoid taking pictures of things in the dark because they always come out awful. That picture might even be good enough for a screen saver considering the size and quality.



"Ja, Kalzium, das ist alles!" -Otto Loewi
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Eddygp
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[*] posted on 1-4-2012 at 13:04


Just have been looking at those GIANT and INCREDIBLE samples of Cs and Rb and... I took a look at my homemade sodium silicate 'crystals', and left the camera.
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ItalianChemist
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[*] posted on 2-4-2012 at 07:03


Quote: Originally posted by White Yeti  
@ItalianChemist, that picture is impressive! How did you take it? I avoid taking pictures of things in the dark because they always come out awful. That picture might even be good enough for a screen saver considering the size and quality.

Thank you!
I used a normal camera with macro function!
@Satan I haven't done OLED yet!

[Edited on 2-4-2012 by ItalianChemist]
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[*] posted on 3-4-2012 at 12:21


Other pictures :D
1. Europium nitrate hydrate under UV-A light!
EuUV.JPG - 100kB
2.Ru(bipy)3(BF4)2 under UV-A light!
DSC02536 copia.JPG - 116kB
3.Melted iodine
DSC02719 copia.JPG - 68kB
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kristofvagyok
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[*] posted on 6-4-2012 at 14:07


Hi everyone,

This is my first post on the board so let's start it: I work in an organic chemistry lab somewhere in Europe and I am also a freelance photographer so I got some pictures...
They are not special, no Europium, Ruthenium or any special. just simple organic and inorganic chemistry, but I hope You like them:

More pictures here: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/

-Kristof

120326_004.jpg - 265kB 120322_019.jpg - 264kB 120403_025.JPG - 323kB
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 6-4-2012 at 14:28


Hey Kristof.

Nice pictures! They're quite stunning, what kind of camera did you use? Mind if I ask what these pictures are of?

Welcome to the forum!




"Ja, Kalzium, das ist alles!" -Otto Loewi
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kristofvagyok
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[*] posted on 6-4-2012 at 14:41


Quote: Originally posted by White Yeti  
what kind of camera did you use? Mind if I ask what these pictures are of?


I use Nikon D5000 with wide variety of lenses.

The pictures are from my current research, what is about nitrogen containing heterocyclic ring formations... And some else thing, what I do in the lab (last picture is inorganic chemistry).

That cute red thing in the breaker (what is an awesome dye and impossible to remove from your skin:)) was a nitro-phenylpyvuric acid ester synthesis from nitrotoluene, dialkly oxalate and some sodium alkoxyde. When this material contacts any base it turns blood red, otherwise it is yellow.

The separating funnel contained some ether and some phenylpyvuric acid in the water what didn't reacted in an other kind of reaction.

And the last picture is molten silver under some borax with a methane/oxygen torch.

On the blog there is a lot other picture (updating daily, or as often as I could:))

[Edited on 6-4-2012 by kristofvagyok]
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Adas
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[*] posted on 7-4-2012 at 00:14


That methane/oxygen torch is just amazing! The temperature must be extremely high!



Rest In Pieces!
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Bot0nist
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[*] posted on 7-4-2012 at 06:53


Very nice kristofvagyok! Welcome to SciMad. Those pictures are beautiful. Glad your here.



U.T.F.S.E. and learn the joys of autodidacticism!


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Mailinmypocket
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[*] posted on 9-4-2012 at 17:01


Finally did the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in a petri dish :) too many time lapse pictures to attach, but amazing to watch happen... hypnotizing! It repeated itself, sort of like a beating heart with the same recurring pattern. If i swirled the dish new patterns appeared and started the same sequence. Eventually it slowed down and became clear ~15 mins

The ferroin solution used was prepared by the reaction of 1,10- phenathroline hydrate (0.88g) and ferrous sulfate (0.35g) in 50 ml distilled H2O.

*Edit* The pictures were attached in reverse order, it goes red to blue.

See section 5.2.3 for procedure here

bz6.JPG - 139kB bz5.JPG - 132kB bz3.JPG - 125kB


[Edited on 10-4-2012 by Mailinmypocket]
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 9-4-2012 at 17:28


Those are quite nice! For everyone's viewing pleasure, I'll attach a video of the process (not mine).
<iframe sandbox width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3JAqrRnKFHo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>




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Mailinmypocket
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[*] posted on 9-4-2012 at 18:04


Thanks! That was my first try, Ive seen that video many times too while trying to figure out the ideal mix. Maybe more concentrated ferroin and/or a catalyst... I didn't add any Ce or Mn, time to tweak the formula! I am going to try with a methyl orange formulation... Hopefully it is as good if not better:)

[Edited on 10-4-2012 by Mailinmypocket]
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[*] posted on 9-4-2012 at 22:11


I've been synthesizing some energetics recently, and in particular, working with recrystallization for stability. It's given me an opportunity to drag out the microscope and check out some crystals.

Here are some crystals of picric acid recrystallized from boiling water at 100x magnification.

These are quite flat crystals of ETN, recrystallized from methanol, also at 100x magnification. This is what the batch of ETN looks like.

This is a crystal of RDX, created via the direct nitration of hexamine from pure nitric acid, and recrystallized from acetone, yet again at 100x magnification. The crystals are a bit bigger than table sugar.
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Endimion17
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 03:29


kristofvagyok, those photos are amazing. It really is great what proper lightning, a sense of perspective from a photographer's eye and macro focusing can do with something that seems so usual.

I was browsing through your tumblr page and noticed you described bromine as having a really bad smell. Why is that?




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DJF90
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 04:29


Because it does. Bromine comes from the greek Bromos, which means stench. At least if I remember correctly.
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 06:43


Isn't bromine a halogen? A volatile one too... Not only do halogens have a smell, but they also destroy your mucous membranes. That's why bromine is usually chilled before use and handled with utmost precaution.



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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 07:00


Quote: Originally posted by kristofvagyok  
Hi everyone,

This is my first post on the board so let's start it: I work in an organic chemistry lab somewhere in Europe and I am also a freelance photographer so I got some pictures...
They are not special, no Europium, Ruthenium or any special. just simple organic and inorganic chemistry, but I hope You like them:

More pictures here: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/

-Kristof



Incredible!!

1 L of bromine, that thing is going to weigh 3 kg! I have always wanted to hold that much Br to feel the weight. Its also going to destroy the bottle cap in no time.

Whats behind the bromine? also looks dangerous




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kristofvagyok
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 07:50


Quote: Originally posted by mr.crow  

Incredible!!

1 L of bromine, that thing is going to weigh 3 kg! I have always wanted to hold that much Br to feel the weight. Its also going to destroy the bottle cap in no time.

Whats behind the bromine? also looks dangerous


The main problem with the bromine is to pour it out from the bottle and weight it, because of the fumes what comes out from it, smells really bad and causes not so good things. The positive thing is the fume hood helps a lot(:

This amount of bromine was used to make dimethoxy alkyls from alkenes by one of my friends.
The scheme was like this: RHC=CHR + Br2 = RHBrC-CBrHR
RHBrC-CBrHR + 2R'OH = RH(OR')C-C(OR')HR + 2HBr

Easy reaction with high yields even in this amounts.

And the cap of the bromine is coated with teflon, so it wont be damaged, I hope(:

[Edited on 10-4-2012 by kristofvagyok]




I have a blog where I post my pictures from my work: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/
-Pictures from chemistry, check it out(:

"You can’t become a chemist and expect to live forever."
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