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Author: Subject: Pretty Pictures (1)
mr.crow
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[*] posted on 16-10-2010 at 20:38


Here is a video

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/KwZ-bEKuuic?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/KwZ-bEKuuic?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

I also boiled it down successfully to PdCl2 :D




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BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 16-10-2010 at 22:53


Mr.crow, thanks for the wonderful picture, it's my desktop now :)

@ Blogfast25
Don't really know what that stuff is. You can see the bottom layer is turning blue/green from the nickel electrodes dissolving. The solids at the bottom are undissolved lithium chloride. When the current was jacked wayyyy up I could get a solid deposit on the cathode that reacted with water with hissing / spattering. My hope at the time was to make lithium, but when I looked into it more it seems some kind of methyl lithium complex was more likely. Don't remember exactly now but it was reported in the DMSO technical bulletin. As you can see however the colors are very vibrant. The red color becomes almost black when allowed to run for some time and solids start to precipitate.




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Rogeryermaw
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[*] posted on 16-10-2010 at 23:37


@ BromicAcid my daughter about blew a gasket when she saw that bright pink fire! was that a thermite or electrolysis produced potassium or obtained by other means? would it be possible to share your method? i would love to reproduce this for her. pink just makes her day and that makes my day! :)



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BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 17-10-2010 at 05:45


Thermite, KOH with magnesium shavings (made myself using a drill). That was a ca. 10 gram scale if I remember it right. I just used a soup can and kept the lid down, it ignited in a few seconds with a torch at the bottom and after the fireworks I pulled back the lid and hit it down on the picnic table causing that fireball.



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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 17-10-2010 at 08:30


Thanks BromicAcid...
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Rogeryermaw
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[*] posted on 17-10-2010 at 10:58


thank you BromicAcid. i appreciate you for that. i'll give this a try soon. maybe soon i'll get back to running the furnace too. sorry for lagging. i've got sinus pressure so bad it feels like my eyes are gonna blow out accompanied by the worst headache i've had in 5 years. problem is i've tried every otc med there is and since i started with this hobby i've been apprehensive about buying any cold meds with psudo in it where traditionally they have worked well for me. so i have to weather it out. but when it passes i'll get back out there. thanks for sharing though. my daughter is begging me to try this.

with a daughter in elementary school and a wife working in the E.R. i guess a lot of germs get brought home....

[Edited on 17-10-2010 by Rogeryermaw]




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Magpie
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[*] posted on 17-10-2010 at 11:47


phosphine burning...

phosphine burning.JPG - 27kB

luminol + KOH in DMSO...

[Edited on 17-10-2010 by Magpie]

luminol+KOH in DMSO.JPG - 24kB




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
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Rogeryermaw
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[*] posted on 21-10-2010 at 22:37


freshly distilled fuming nitric acid.


nitric.JPG - 60kB
i know it's not doing anything spectacular but i think all the acids are pretty. it will likely go toward aqua regia...got a couple of cpu's i dont have a use for.

[Edited on 22-10-2010 by Rogeryermaw]




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mr.crow
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[*] posted on 22-10-2010 at 10:54


Its like a genie in a bottle! Don't rub it the wrong way.

I like the phosphine picture.




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Methansaeuretier
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[*] posted on 22-10-2010 at 11:30


Here's my current self-made desktop background.
It's a picture of a part of an home-made ozonisator I'm currently working on.



Full size:
http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/8504/dsc01695y.jpg






[Edited on 22-10-2010 by Methansaeuretier]

[Edited on 22-10-2010 by Methansaeuretier]
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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 11-12-2010 at 13:03


Physical Laws in action: standing waves in a sauce pan of water about to be brought to the boil, vibrations supplied by a tumble drier about a yard away:





On occasion I’ve seen almost perfectly radially symmetrical standing waves in a half filled pop bottle stood on the drier.

These just show how hard it is to imagine the three dimensional standing waves in the quantum systems that are the electron clouds of our beloved atoms and molecules…
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The WiZard is In
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[*] posted on 13-12-2010 at 10:10
Sulphur mining Kawah Ijen volcano East Java, Indonesia


One would wonder how long these miners live!

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/12/kawah_ijen_by_night...


At no extra charge —
Bulletin of pharmacy, Volume 9 1895

The Sicilian method of procuring pure sulphur from the crude material is wasteful in
the extreme. A pit’s dug in the hillside, about thirty-three feet in diameter and eight
feet deep, and this is filled up with the crude sulphur. It is then fired from the top
and permitted to burn as long as it will. The pure sulphur runs out below and is
collected in a stone vessel and then ladled into damp poplar-wood moulds. These
moulds give the truncated cones of sulphur known to commerce, which weigh from
110 to 130 pounds each. A pit containing about 28,000 cubic feet of crude sulphur
yields in two months 200 tons of the pure sulphur. A large quantity of the crude
sulphur is thus consumed in burning the rest, so that a comparatively small
percentage of pure sulphur is obtained from the mass. The method is, besides, most
unwholesome both to man and to vegetation. Strict laws prevent the burning of
sulphur within a certain distance of human habitation or growing crops, and the
region where sulphur-burning is general is a dreary waste. The scarcity of fuel in Sicily
has seemed to render necessary this crude method of reducing the ore.

There do be a zillion references to this… I choose this because it came up atop the list
@ google.com/books

---
Anyone who has taken High School chemistry is aware of the
Frasch process for mining sulphur. For more than most anyone
here wants to know 'bout the process (which required some
sosphicated engineering) I commend -

Herman Fresch description of his method in - Presentation of the
Perking Medal to Herman Frasch Journal of the Society of
Chemical Industry X(12):73-82 February, 1912.

Google has saved me the trouble of scanning my copy.
http://tinyurl.com/387xpoo


"The surface, consisting of about 200 ft. of clay, follows the
quicksand, gently but surely, and in order to maintain the
pressure which is necessary to prevent the melting water
from breaking into steam, the volume of the sulphur abstracted
from below must be replaced by earth from above. To do this a
dredge with a capacity of 4000 cu. yd. per day became necessary.
Numerous reservoirs have been dug on the outskirts of the mine
to supply the material required to do this. This filling has been
going on constantly, and the ground has sunk to such an extent
that where our house once stood is now 80 ft. below the original
surface."



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DougTheMapper
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[*] posted on 13-12-2010 at 10:52


The pictures of burning sulfur are really neat, but what an environmental nightmare!

Here are a few from my shop that I'm particularly fond of:



This is of a water electrolysis cell I built using NaHCO3 solution as the electrolyte and stainless steel plates for electrodes.



I built it because I wanted an oxyhydrogen torch. Here's the picture of the nearly invisible flame igniting a bit of paper.



And my favorite: melting a chunk of refractory designed to take 1600C.

Construction details and pictures here if anyone's interested.




Victor Grignard is a methylated spirit.
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mr.crow
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[*] posted on 13-12-2010 at 19:55


Good stuff everyone

Won't the oxy-hydrogen flame move into the tubes and explode?




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bbartlog
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[*] posted on 13-12-2010 at 20:13


Follow the link he provided. There are multiple attempts to prevent and mitigate flashback (mainly though, steel wool in the large steel tube).
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mrjeffy321
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[*] posted on 13-12-2010 at 21:30


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kuro96inlaila
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[*] posted on 14-12-2010 at 04:46


Any explanation about molybdenum picture?
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DougTheMapper
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[*] posted on 14-12-2010 at 07:30


Mo has oxidation states of 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, -1, and -2. IIRC it also easily forms complexes. I imagine that quite a few colors can be made with Mo compounds.



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watson.fawkes
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[*] posted on 14-12-2010 at 08:54


Quote: Originally posted by DougTheMapper  
This is of a water electrolysis cell I built using NaHCO3 solution as the electrolyte and stainless steel plates for electrodes.
Thanks for this. I've been thinking about making one of these myself. I even just rebooted an existing thread on these kind of torches.
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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 14-12-2010 at 08:54


Molybdenum electron configuration [Kr] 5s1 4d5: lots of oxidation states and lots of possibilities for colours with those unfilled d-orbitals absorbing VIS photons…
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mrjeffy321
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[*] posted on 14-12-2010 at 23:48


Quote: Originally posted by kuro96inlaila  
Any explanation about molybdenum picture?


Quote: Originally posted by DougTheMapper  
Mo has oxidation states of 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, -1, and -2. IIRC it also easily forms complexes. I imagine that quite a few colors can be made with Mo compounds.


Right, molybdenum has several possible oxidation states and, in combination with various complexing agents, it is fairly easy to create a wide variety of colorful solutions. Above, I created a 'rainbow' of molybdenum solutions by changing the oxidation state of the Mo ions, complexing agent, and pH.
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turd
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[*] posted on 15-12-2010 at 02:02


Quote: Originally posted by DougTheMapper  
Mo has oxidation states of 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, -1, and -2. IIRC it also easily forms complexes.

That's a quite naïve view of Mo chemistry. In reality Mo does all kind of crazy polyoxoanions (isolated, chains, sheets, 3D) where Mo has non-integer oxidation states. If you're (un)lucky it's incommensurate and every single Mo atom in your compound has a different oxidation state. That's in solid state - in solution it's probably even more complicated since the whole mess is dynamic. Just say no to Mo chemistry. :P
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[*] posted on 15-12-2010 at 13:37


Crystals of elemental silver




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kuro96inlaila
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[*] posted on 15-12-2010 at 23:05


Quote: Originally posted by NurdRage  
Crystals of elemental silver






Is that silver crystal formed from displacement of silver by copper metal from silver nitrate solution?
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[*] posted on 16-12-2010 at 00:44


Electrochemical deposition. I'm putting together a video on the process.
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