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Author: Subject: chemical waste books
Mildronate
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[*] posted on 2-4-2019 at 11:42
chemical waste books


Anybody knows books about chemical waste neutralization?
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12thealchemist
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[*] posted on 2-4-2019 at 11:53


I have the offerings of popular YouTube channels?

Attachment: Waste processing - 11.05.2018.pdf (87kB)
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Mildronate
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[*] posted on 2-4-2019 at 13:30


I need book about waste treatment industrial various lab chemicals not only some metals, maybe some handbook or something.
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BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 2-4-2019 at 13:35


In industry waste treatment is usually handled by and outside facility within the US. That's because you need certain certifications to treat something which you earmark it as a waste.



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morganbw
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[*] posted on 2-4-2019 at 14:33


Many plants from before their inception have the waste in mind.
I can give examples from a few plants from the USA and Japan as well as Malaysia.

All three plants were designed with waste disposal, if not in mind, as a necessity.

Each plant had a tank farm to which the waste was pumped to, mostly what happened there was acid/base neutralization as well as solids removal if that was above the limit set by the wastewater utility.

This was done by a variety of means, flocculation tanks, neutralization tanks, clarifiers, filter presses to take the excess solid.

In none of these plants was anything special done with lab waste, there was just not that much of it.

I could write a bit more on the waste as the plant I worked at began recycling most of the wastewater that it created and reused. It was pretty elaborate and pushed by a chemical engineer that I did not like. I do have to give him nods here though.

My point is that industrial waste is not black and white. Industry waste disposal is not black and white. It is plant specific.

Special, small amounts, not taken into account with the plant design and disposal systems is farmed out.
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j_sum1
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[*] posted on 2-4-2019 at 16:32


For my own lab, I recycle much of the waste I produce.
[*]Ag gets recovered
[*]Cr gets converter to Cr(III) and stored ready for making some dichromate in the future.
[*]Iodide gets crystallised for I2 recovery
[*]Cu gets precipitated as carbonate and reprocessed where volumes are larger

I process some waste by precipitating into innocuous forms
[*]Pb gets converted to carbonate (really small volumes)
[*]Cu in small volumes is also precipitated as carbonate
[*]Mn usually ends up as MnO2 which I do not always recover
[*]Other inorganics in small quantities also get converted to insoluble forms and stored.
When a sufficient quantity of these has accumulated I mix them with cement, sand and gravel to make a bucket of concrete. I try to proportion this block so that it is relatively hard even if it is not construction quality. This block gets disposed of as solid waste destinbed for landfill.

Other waste streams
[*]DCM is distilled and reused where possible. Otherwise it is allowed to evaporate.
[*]Organic solvent waste is incinerated if I can do so cleanly.
[*]acids and bases are neutralised and flushed with a reasonable quantity of water.
[*]oxidants (usually pool chemicals) are reduced and also flushed with water
[*]ethanol and non-hazardous solutions or suspensions are flushed with water -- usually test-tube scale quantities

The point is that I think about waste disposal in relation to what I am doing. I am not generally using anything that presents much of a hazard -- comparable to standard household use. But if I do something new I spend some time thinking about what I will do with the waste stream. For example I have some As samples that I would love to clean up but will do some research into responsible treatment of residues before I attempt anything.

So the answer depends entirely on what your waste is and how much there is. There do exist easy solutions for many things.
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FloridaAlchemist
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[*] posted on 3-4-2019 at 09:09
Hazardous Chemicals and Disposal Guide


Hazardous Chemicals and Disposal Guide
M.A. Armour,L.M Browne,G.L. Weir
3rd Edition,1987

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woelen
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