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Author: Subject: Dehydratation of FeO(OH) and CaSO4
Bedlasky
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[*] posted on 24-4-2019 at 11:05
Dehydratation of FeO(OH) and CaSO4


Hello.

I had some hydrated ferric oxide and calcium sulphate dihydrate from experiments I've made long ago. So I decided to dehydrated them in oven at 275°C. But I am little confused from result of this dehydration.

CaSO4 isn't white but beige. Is this normal or is it contaminated by some organic impurities?

Ferric oxide isn't red but black. Why?

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fusso
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[*] posted on 24-4-2019 at 21:50


Try magnet test. If it's attracted to magnet it's Fe3O4.



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Ubya
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[*] posted on 25-4-2019 at 01:09


most ferric oxide produced with wet chemistry is black. look at nurdrage's video on the preparation of ferric oxide for thermite, he uses 3 methods, and only the electrolytic one gives red iron oxide




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Bedlasky
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[*] posted on 30-4-2019 at 18:52


Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Try magnet test. If it's attracted to magnet it's Fe3O4.


I tried this and it had not attracted to magnet.

Quote: Originally posted by Ubya  
most ferric oxide produced with wet chemistry is black. look at nurdrage's video on the preparation of ferric oxide for thermite, he uses 3 methods, and only the electrolytic one gives red iron oxide


Thanks!
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CharlieA
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[*] posted on 1-5-2019 at 16:14


Am I correct in assuming that Fe3O4 is a typo? Or is this FeO(dot)Fe2O3. I am not familiar with this substance.
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oberkarteufel
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[*] posted on 1-5-2019 at 23:55


No, it's not a typo. This compound contains iron on both +III and +II oxidation states. There's also an oxide Pb3O4 with +II and +IV lead atoms.

Edit: Naturally occuring Fe3O4 is known as magnetite.

[Edited on 2-5-2019 by oberkarteufel]
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CharlieA
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[*] posted on 2-5-2019 at 17:18


Quote: Originally posted by oberkarteufel  
No, it's not a typo. This compound contains iron on both +III and +II oxidation states. There's also an oxide Pb3O4 with +II and +IV lead atoms.

Edit: Naturally occuring Fe3O4 is known as magnetite.


Thank you. I have learned something and that is a good think:)
Charlie A
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