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Author: Subject: ISCO FOXY 200 Fraction Collector
MountainMan
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[*] posted on 14-5-2019 at 09:35
ISCO FOXY 200 Fraction Collector


Does anyone have experience with this model ?
I've seen several on EBay and want to get one for some column chromatography experiments.
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Dr.Bob
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[*] posted on 19-5-2019 at 18:48


I have used many of the FOXY variations. They are great for simple "automated" chromatography. They are pretty sturdy and easy to use. The racks are easy to find used as well, the best one IMHO is the 16 x 150 mm rack, works for most smaller columns.

I think I have a smaller Gilson type fraction collector which is good for smaller columns (holds about 60 13 x 100 m tubes) if anyone wanted to try to build a simple system. Best to have a column with a luer or screw thread type output to connect to PTFE tbing for the collector.

You can either collect all fractions or even control them via a UV detector. I wish someone would build a nice LED based 254 UV detector, as the typical lamp based ones are quite expensive. With a simple UV LED, it seems that one could be built for < $100.
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DavidJR
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[*] posted on 20-5-2019 at 16:14


Quote: Originally posted by Dr.Bob  

I wish someone would build a nice LED based 254 UV detector, as the typical lamp based ones are quite expensive. With a simple UV LED, it seems that one could be built for < $100.


UV LEDs with wavelength that short are hard to come by and VERY expensive (several hundred pounds for one with output power less than one milliwatt).

If you're willing to go up to 278nm, then it gets much more affordable, though still not cheap (iirc around £30 for a single LED, only a couple of milliwatts).

[Edited on 21-5-2019 by DavidJR]
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MountainMan
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[*] posted on 21-5-2019 at 07:08


Yes, I checked on the UV LEDs from 260 to 280 nm that don't require a special driver and the prices are in the several hundred dollar range. I may spring for a 280 UV that I could also use for another project and drive it using an Arduino and read the signal from a photodiode if I can find one that can develop a signal that with that wavelength range.

Dr. Bob, do you have any fraction collectors for sale ?
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DavidJR
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[*] posted on 21-5-2019 at 07:12


Quote: Originally posted by MountainMan  
Yes, I checked on the UV LEDs from 260 to 280 nm that don't require a special driver and the prices are in the several hundred dollar range. I may spring for a 280 UV that I could also use for another project and drive it using an Arduino and read the signal from a photodiode if I can find one that can develop a signal that with that wavelength range.

Dr. Bob, do you have any fraction collectors for sale ?


Photodiodes that will detect <254nm are not hard to come by.
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[*] posted on 21-5-2019 at 08:09


A dual 254/365 UV illumination system is about $100 over here. Not cheap, but not that expensive either.
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Dr.Bob
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[*] posted on 21-5-2019 at 09:41


Detecting 254 is easy, getting a pure 254 signal is harder. Simple UV sources are not terrible, but most are not very narrow band, and the lamps burn out often and give variable light output, so that is why an LED would be ideal. Much easier to balance against a blank, last a long time, and be very small.

I have one or two small fraction collectors, one is a Gilson FC-203B Fraction Collector, the other might be a Foxy Jr, I'll have to dig it out. The Gilson takes racks of 13 x 100 tubes. They both sell for a few hundred on Ebay and other sites. I'd be happy to beat any price for a working model on ebay or similar place.
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MountainMan
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[*] posted on 21-5-2019 at 10:52


Dr Bob: Please let me know the prices for each model plus estimated shipping (I'm in Prescott, AZ)
. I have tubes of 12 / 75, 13 / 100 and 16/100 mm so the the tube size is not that important for me.
Thanks.
Personally, I usually don't worry about the 280 readings for the fractions. I usually just put an aliquot from each fraction in a microtiter plate and add some Bradford reagent and /or the enzyme substrate to get a rough idea of what's coming off the column. I perform the full protein assay and / or enzyme activity after all fractions have been collected.
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