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Author: Subject: Testing EM Sensitivities
twelti
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[*] posted on 17-6-2019 at 14:29
Testing EM Sensitivities


Has anyone made up their own EM sensitivity testing machines? I saw one or two nice examples in SM, though they looked a bit difficult for someone without access to a shop to make. I'm interested in simple-ish devices for at least relative testing of sensitivities for ES discharge and either impact or friction (assuming for now that they are reasonably related).

For the latter, I could imagine a fairly simple device with 2 piece of micron sandpaper and a fixed weight on top, and the EM placed between, and maybe a solenoid or other electromechanical device to pull the top piece of sandpaper, and count number of detonations.

Any suggestions/examples of DIY test rigs are welcome.
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MineMan
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[*] posted on 17-6-2019 at 18:29


I have an answer, but not one your probably want to hear...

I think your focusing too much on sensitivities and testing sensitivities. I say this after reading your posts. Nearly all of the EMs have published data... except s9me of the primary’s and exotic ligands...

A hammer and motor and pestle I believe are enough, unless you intend to pitch an explosive to industry or write a scientific study...
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twelti
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[*] posted on 18-6-2019 at 08:53


Yes, some of these substances that are off the beaten track maybe, an can't just be looked up. Also, so many ways to reduce (or increase) sensitivity of a given substance. For example, I tried stearic acid and dextrine on that nickel AG perchlorate. Grinding in a mortar doesn't seem to show any obvious difference but I'm guessing there is some. I guess I could focus on testing other explosive properties though. Lead expansion?
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markx
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[*] posted on 18-6-2019 at 09:19


We should not forget that the vast published amount of data which exist for most compounds, although being accurate, verified and reliable, shall not tell anything about the properties of the actual sample one is working with.
Therein may lie a grave pitfall, as without any sensitivity testing of the sample at hand we only assume that it has the claimed properties.
In reality the sample may be altered by side products or substances that can stem from any number of sources....contaminated chemicals, residue on reactor vessels, unwanted reactions with tools or materials used in synthesis, misdosing, altered synthesis conditions, etc.
So one might end up working with a more sensitive sample than could be assumed based on generic reference and the only way to be sure is to conduct at least some kind of assessment before further manipulations.
I agree, it does not have to be a sophisticated test with top quality equipment....a simple hammer blow can put things into perspective if one gathers a bit experience and learns to read it correctly.
If one is more serious about the chosen field of research, then taking the time and effort to put together some "proper" testing gear is sure going to help a lot. It shall give actual comparable quantitative data that can help the researcher to understand the effects and trendlines that varying certain factors shall have upon the end result.
A weight drop frame with a height scale to measure impact sensitivity is very useful, a brisance cell to assess sand crush effect, any approach for friction that works to give repeatable and comparable results. A melting point apparatus and electrical discharge tester are also immensely useful, but might prove a bit more complicated to construct. Not impossible though....




Exact science is a figment of imagination.......
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MineMan
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[*] posted on 18-6-2019 at 17:08


Quote: Originally posted by twelti  
Yes, some of these substances that are off the beaten track maybe, an can't just be looked up. Also, so many ways to reduce (or increase) sensitivity of a given substance. For example, I tried stearic acid and dextrine on that nickel AG perchlorate. Grinding in a mortar doesn't seem to show any obvious difference but I'm guessing there is some. I guess I could focus on testing other explosive properties though. Lead expansion?


How much SA did you use? Surly 5 percent would make a difference in a mortar??

Graphite can help with friction and static too
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twelti
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[*] posted on 18-6-2019 at 22:51


Quote: Originally posted by MineMan  


How much SA did you use? Surly 5 percent would make a difference in a mortar??

Graphite can help with friction and static too


I wasn't too precise, maybe 3 %. I tried just tonight dissolving the SA in Etoh, and putting the NiAG Perchlorate in that. Now I overshot too far. It is waxy and insensitive. Too much SA. It did work though, in a way. I want to try graphite too.
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