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Author: Subject: Copper Acetate
Kovoc
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[*] posted on 7-8-2019 at 10:39
Copper Acetate


I recently made some copper acetate without thinking about what I'm actually gonna use it for, could someone give me some reactions it's used in. Thanks!!!
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Abromination
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[*] posted on 7-8-2019 at 14:54


It is sometimes used as a catalyst in organic chemistry, but there aren't too many other uses of it as far as I know. It acts like most weak acidic copper compounds do.



List of materials made by ScienceMadness.org users:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1nmJ8uq-h4IkXPxD5svnT...
--------------------------------
Elements Collected: H, Li, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, I, Au, Pb, Bi, Am
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mayko
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[*] posted on 7-8-2019 at 15:46


Its thermal decomposition is pretty interesting: pyrophoric copper and offgassings which can be condensed or ignited:

https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=10...

Exhibit C: http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=61791#...





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[*] posted on 7-8-2019 at 15:48


You can use it to make copper aspirinate and other copper(II) salts.




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[*] posted on 8-8-2019 at 22:02


Test for reducing sugars.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barfoed%27s_test
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TheMrbunGee
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[*] posted on 8-8-2019 at 22:34


Copper acetate grows most beautiful crystals I have seen, If you end up not doing anything with it, maybe grow some.



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Ubya
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[*] posted on 9-8-2019 at 01:35


Quote: Originally posted by TheMrbunGee  
Copper acetate grows most beautiful crystals I have seen, If you end up not doing anything with it, maybe grow some.

totally agree, completely dark and perfect sharp edges, mesmerizing





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[*] posted on 9-8-2019 at 04:22


Per a recent thread of mine:

Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  

......................
but decided to attempt a prep because of this very recent (May 2019) article at https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/5/eaav7689 . To quote:

"The higher OH yield in the presence of UV light might be due to a photo-Fenton–like reaction (R4), where Fe(III) and organic ligands, such as acetate, which is a product of the initial Fenton-like reaction (R3), form a complex leading to the reduction of Fe and the formation of an organic radical that will form OH.

Fe(III)+CH3C(O)O−+hυ→Fe(II)+CH3C(O)O→OH radical formation (R4) "

The above implies to me that UV light activated Ferric acetate may be of use as a source of photo induced hydroxyl radical creation and as a path to recycling ferric to ferrous in a photo-fenton reaction.

Now, this is not unique, iron oxalate, a case in point, but if one has a good path to the basic iron acetate, that many be of interest to some.

[Edited on 30-7-2019 by AJKOER]


The ferric acetate is recently cited because it apparently naturally occurs in clouds (authors fields include Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences)!

I will not be surprised on a similar property for copper acetate (as Cu like Fe, is a transition metal, albeit not found significantly in clouds) relating to a photo-fenton-type reaction, as it is based on copper, and not the classic iron fenton (or photo-fenton) reaction.

[Edited on 8-8-2019 by AJKOER]
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[*] posted on 9-8-2019 at 06:12


Why and how would iron go into the sky?



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[*] posted on 9-8-2019 at 08:06


Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Why and how would iron go into the sky?


Per a source 'Characterization of Atmospheric Iron Speciation and Acid Processing at Metropolitan Newark on the US East Coast', by
Guojie Xu and Yuan Gao, in Atmosphere 2017, 8(4), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos8040066 or https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4433/8/4/66/htm , to quote:

"The natural source of atmospheric Fe is aeolian dust derived from major deserts in Asia, North Africa, South America, and Australia that is transported and deposited to the ocean [2,3,4,5]. Atmospheric Fe may also come from anthropogenic sources, in particular from regions with heavy air pollution in the Northern Hemisphere. Major anthropogenic sources for Fe include agricultural practices [4], biomass burning [6,7] and combustion emissions [8,9,10]. Recent model results suggest that combustion-derived Fe can represent a large portion of soluble Fe fluxes, with the highest values (30%) close to the East Asian continent in the North Pacific [11]."
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