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Author: Subject: Reaction between Lime Sulfur and HCL
camurgo
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[*] posted on 8-9-2019 at 09:19
Reaction between Lime Sulfur and HCL


The internet tells me that 'Lime Sulfur' is composed of polysulfides of general formula CaSx, where x varies from 2 to 7.

I know one of the products of mixing 'Lime Sulfur' and HCL is hydrogen sulfide, but what is (are) the other product(s) ? Does anyone know?

Possibly each polysulfide (CaS2, CaS3, CaS5...) will react in a different way?

I'm interested in understanding how this reactions actually happens, and knowing all the products would go a long way in helping with that.

Does anybody know? Thanks.
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teodor
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[*] posted on 9-9-2019 at 02:02


I think you will get H2S mixed with different sulfanes (hydrogen polysulfides), which mysterious presence you can always see because they deposit sulfur on precisious glass surfaces (I think this fact makes their fractional separation almost impossible). Byt the way, It is very hard to remove sulfur from glass with my usual set of cleaning solutions.

So, ask google for "sulfanes" or "hydrogen polysulfide". Like this: https://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/v68-384

Also, I think the high ability of sulfur to polymerize in chains of different length makes the chemistry of sulfur a bit complex and insular.

[Edited on 9-9-2019 by teodor]
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mackolol
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[*] posted on 9-9-2019 at 11:31


Quote: Originally posted by teodor  

Byt the way, It is very hard to remove sulfur from glass with my usual set of cleaning solutions.

[Edited on 9-9-2019 by teodor]


Have you tried hot toluene or xylenes?
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camurgo
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[*] posted on 9-9-2019 at 11:45


Thank you very much @teodor.
With further research based on the additional info you gave me I think I'll be able to eventually completely answer my own question.
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teodor
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[*] posted on 10-9-2019 at 01:51


Quote: Originally posted by mackolol  

Have you tried hot toluene or xylenes?


I didn't try it yet but I know the property of toluene to dissolve sulfur. Just didn't use it as a cleaning solution yet because already have a lot of other bottles "for washing" and always tried to limit their number. But all they failed, so the next try will be toluene.
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[*] posted on 10-9-2019 at 05:29


I use hot concentrated NaOH-solutions to clean sulfur from glassware. It dissolves fairly easily in that. Concentrated NaOH also attacks glass, but it only does so very slowly and smooth clear glass (from beakers, erlenmeyers, test tubes, flasks) hardly is attacked.

-----------------------------------------------------

Polysulfides give H2S and H2Sn (with N > 1). In practice, the hydrogen polysulfide is so unstable, that it decomposes quickly to H2S and elemental sulfur. The products, however, are not easily distinguishable. It is a dirty and very smelly mess of sulfur and hydrogen sulfides.

[Edited on 10-9-19 by woelen]




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teodor
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[*] posted on 10-9-2019 at 06:19


Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
I use hot concentrated NaOH-solutions to clean sulfur from glassware. It dissolves fairly easily in that. Concentrated NaOH also attacks glass, but it only does so very slowly and smooth clear glass (from beakers, erlenmeyers, test tubes, flasks) hardly is attacked.



Thank you for the suggestion. I still have sulfur inside my Dimroth cooler and don't want to put hot NaOH inside because it always eats a bit of surface of glass joints. Also I try to use as little stages in cleaning as possible that means a less bathes etc. For most purposes HCl and/or chromic acid works like an universal solution. Also I found Na3PO4 bath works pretty well so I often use it instead of NaOH. And actually I have a second Dimroth (bought 2 by an error) so now I keep this specially for "durty" experiments (like with sulfur). But I will try to clean it with NaOH or Na3PO4 some day, thank you for the idea (indeed, NaOH dissolves sulfur).
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[*] posted on 15-9-2019 at 20:12


Quote: Originally posted by teodor  
Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
I use hot concentrated NaOH-solutions to clean sulfur from glassware. It dissolves fairly easily in that. Concentrated NaOH also attacks glass, but it only does so very slowly and smooth clear glass (from beakers, erlenmeyers, test tubes, flasks) hardly is attacked.



Thank you for the suggestion. I still have sulfur inside my Dimroth cooler and don't want to put hot NaOH inside because it always eats a bit of surface of glass joints. Also I try to use as little stages in cleaning as possible that means a less bathes etc. For most purposes HCl and/or chromic acid works like an universal solution. Also I found Na3PO4 bath works pretty well so I often use it instead of NaOH. And actually I have a second Dimroth (bought 2 by an error) so now I keep this specially for "durty" experiments (like with sulfur). But I will try to clean it with NaOH or Na3PO4 some day, thank you for the idea (indeed, NaOH dissolves sulfur).


Couldn't you just burn away the sulfur?




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