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Author: Subject: Anhydrous ferric chloride + calcium carbide
rockyit98
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smile.gif posted on 25-9-2019 at 06:18
Anhydrous ferric chloride + calcium carbide


today i got some Anhydrous ferric chloride.and i thought how it would it react with CaC2 since i got some rotting away anyway.what do you think?
i'm thinking melting FeCl3 and CaC2 in a cup and running away .
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[*] posted on 25-9-2019 at 18:50


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[*] posted on 26-9-2019 at 06:56


WTF is this doing in Biochemistry? What's the deal with this user? It's always like 160 character posts that do or explain nothing.
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rockyit98
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[*] posted on 26-9-2019 at 07:23


sorry i was making my ideas out there so to get advise before do something stupidly dangerous.
i was very sleepy when i posted the topic.also i'm studying for an exam so don't have much time to do experiments by my self or writing long posts
but what do you think
2FeCl3 +3CaC2 ------> +2Fe +6C
or
2FeCl3 +3CaC2------->3CaCl2 +2Fe3C

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cementite
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[*] posted on 26-9-2019 at 09:32


I think you're going to get either a) no reaction in the absence of a solvent, or b) tar-like residue from the oxidation of the acetylide ion, or c) the same kind of detonation that silver acetylide can give.



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[*] posted on 26-9-2019 at 09:42


If you try "melting" FeCl3 in an open container, most of it will just decompose to FeCl2 and chlorine. Ferrous chloride melts at around 700C. For reference, iron or steel will glow bright red at that temperature.
Heating CaC2 in the open to anywhere near its melting point will convert it to calcium cyanamide by reaction with atmospheric nitrogen.
So you're most likely to end up with a mixture of your starting reagents, ferrous chloride, and perhaps a bit of calcium cyanamide, without much reaction between any of the compounds, unless you can keep the ferrous chloride molten at around 700-1000C.




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[*] posted on 26-9-2019 at 10:02


how about mixing table salt first, to make NaFeCl4 which melt around 170C?



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