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Author: Subject: what do you use to store iodine/bromine
thethule
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[*] posted on 24-4-2011 at 16:51


Cheers mate!
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HydroCarbon
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[*] posted on 24-4-2011 at 16:55


I wonder the same thing about the internal pressure of sublimated iodine in a sealed glass container.

I've always wanted to construct a clear glass orb with iodine sealed within just to have as a novelty/ decorative piece. The iodine would turn to vapor on hot days then cool and crystallize on the inside during cool weather. Has anyone done or heard about this being done?

I would imagine that a well constructed thick glass orb should have no problem containing a small amount of iodine (one half to one gram) even at around 100 deg. F. But I would be quite horrible if it was to suddenly explode, especially if it was being held.
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[*] posted on 24-4-2011 at 17:09


We keep I2 in 500 g bottles. You must use a plastic lid. It does not cause much pressure but will sublime and form crystals on the sides and lid given time. Just do not use metal lids as I2 is still moderately reactive.
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[*] posted on 11-6-2011 at 13:09


My bromine is in a pyrex media bottle with a blue cap. I wrapped the cap in electrical tape, and I can barely smell the bromine. However, the PP cap is no longer blue, but bromine brown.



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simba
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[*] posted on 13-6-2011 at 16:24


Quote: Originally posted by Sedit  
Iodine has always been a pain in the ass to me and I would assume Bromine to be just as bad. With the iodine I find storing it underwater to help alot so that the cap does not corrode.


Same thing here...it does not seem to evaporate away in water.
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Morgan
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[*] posted on 13-6-2011 at 17:49


Is RTV silicone affected by iodine? I have some long quartz tubing I was thinking to seal some iodine crystals in. They sell silicone stoppers and with a touch of the fresh RTV I could glue a quartz tube closed with iodine crystals perhaps?
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rannyfash
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[*] posted on 22-4-2012 at 02:44


is the bromine reacting with the blue polypropylene or is it just porous to bromine?
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[*] posted on 22-4-2012 at 04:15


I store my bromine in a Schott-Duran media bottle with a teflon liner. It remains perfectly well and the cap does not turn brown. It looks pristine and around the bottle there is not a single sign of corrosion or any smell of bromine.



[Edited on 22-4-12 by woelen]




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kristofvagyok
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[*] posted on 22-4-2012 at 06:06


We store bromine in glass bottles with a PTFE cap.

It is also highly recommended to use polycoated bottles, because they don't broke so easily.

Or just the old style: in a glass ampoule (:

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gravityzero
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 08:49
Iodine Containment


Around 6 months ago, I came across around 200g of iodine. Had a few plans at the moment, but had to put them on hold.
It arrived vacuum sealed in a standard plastic vacuum bag.

Against my better judgement, I have yet to take it out of the bag. I'm sure everyone knows what a horrendous mess it can be working with this stuff.
It is clear to see that the iodine is slowly escaping the vacuum bag, but it isn't a big deal at this point.

First, I was wondering if prolong storage in plastic would contaminate the product at all?

Secondly, I would like to place in a different container. Any suggestions?
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 08:53


The iodine shouldn't be contaminated. The best way to store it is in a fluoropolymer bottle such as PFA (on eBay) or in glass bottles with Teflon caps. I store mine in the latter and it works great, no smell at all or staining of things in the vicinity. I happened to get some excellent amber glass bottles with Teflon caps from our own Dr. Bob by the way...
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 11:23


Thanks Mailinmypocket. I went with the teflon capped media bottles.
Picked up a few Hybex brand on ebay. It had to be one of the only type bottles I don't already have.

Really want to keep this stuff in good shape, as it can be a pain in the nads to find iodine in quantity.
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 13:32


Iodine works fine in any glass bottle with a Teflon lined cap (most of those caps are green). For bromine, the Quarpak narrow mouth bottles with green Teflon lined caps work OK, although there are similar glass bottles with other types of PTFE lids. I would keep the bromine inside at least one other container, just in case of any leaks or breaks, often people keep the glass bottle in a steel or plastic container with some Na2CO3 or similar base on the bottom to absorb acid vapors to prevent rust in cabinets.
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 14:09


I had my iodine stored in an I-Chem™ bottle with a PTFE-lined polypropylene cap (silicone rubber backing). The cap was securely closed (but not overtightened), wrapped with Parafilm® M, and stored in a cool, dry, dark environment for a couple years. When I retrieved it, I discovered that iodine vapor had escaped and begun to degrade the polypropylene, causing it to become brittle. I have since sealed my iodine into two large glass ampoules, which I keep carefully packed in an HDPE tube with cotton.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that perhaps <em>not all</em> PTFE-lined caps are suitable.




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Mailinmypocket
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 14:28


Yes. I have noticed bromine in particular seems to enjoy penetrating PTFE a bit and when sniffing the cap (which would look ridiculous if somebody saw me do it) reveals that indeed some gets through. Storing halogens in the freezer is ideal. In the case of iodine just make sure to let it come to room temperature before opening the bottle to avoid moisture condensing on the I2 itself.
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 19:45


The phenolic caps are much better, the normal blacks ones are pretty good, the green ones might be just colored, or may even be a different plastic, but they have held up for years in my experience. I have seen commercial bottles of bromine with the green Quarpak caps, although in 2 years, almost any polymer can get softened by halogens. But I have not seen any problem myself. Bromine can even soften some types of Teflon type polymers.

And silicone rubber is not good with halogens or even halogenated solvents, which I learned when trying to use silicone rubber septa caps, which do not hold up to DCM well at all. Also remember that most polyethylene and polypropylene polymers contain some monomeric unsaturated materials, so they both absorb and react with halogens to form halogenated polymers, but that can create stress on the plastic and cracks.
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[*] posted on 22-9-2014 at 06:16


Related to this topic: I just obtained a 50g bottle of iodine, by Sigma Aldrich. The container seems to cope very well for now (no iodine smell). The bottle itself is made of what appears to be very thick PP. But does anyone have any idea what the cap may be made of?

In the meantime, after reading all the posts in this thread, I decided to make a Teflon liner for one of my amber glass chemical bottles, for a more permanent storage of my iodine. Luckily I have a small sheet of Teflon lying around.
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[*] posted on 22-9-2014 at 17:18


For bromine I have heard that only sealed glass ampules will contain it. For my I2, I use a bottle with a ground glass stopper wrapped in teflon tape. I have to really cram that stopper in there and twist a few turns for a good seal but so far my ~20g of I2 has been stable now for 2 years with no leakage.



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[*] posted on 23-9-2014 at 10:15


Another thing, possibly of interest: you can use a Pasteur pipette as an ampoule - provided that you have a half-decent bunsen burner or gas torch. Which I don't so I have to make do with a minil handheld butane burner, and all kind of glasswork is a PITA. But even so, I managed to seal both ends of a Pasteur pipette with some sulfur inside.
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[*] posted on 15-10-2014 at 12:01


I put my tiny amount of iodine into a glass bottle with phenolic resin cap and PP liner/insert. The liner got covered immediately with a thin layer of sublimated iodine.

As soon as I get my little lab fridge, that bottle goes in immediately. I really don't see any other option for long term storage of this stuff. I don't even want to imagine the travails of room temperature storage of bromine. Sounds nightmarish.
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[*] posted on 15-10-2014 at 13:04


I have 10+ year old bottles of bromine from Aldrich that are in glass bottles with a special red fluoropolymer cap. They do just fine. They also sometimes use a clear translucent plastic cap for aggressives, not sure what is made of, I have seen it on oxalyl chloride, sulfonyl chloride, and PCl3 for example. The real issue is having secondary containment, both for any fumes, as well as to protect the bottle and prevent spills. I have had large bottles of chemicals break over the years, and several times having the bottle in a glass or plastic tray has saved me from a big mess. PP trays are good, as they resist nearly anything, glass dishes are good for smaller bottles, but not as safe for larger ones.
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[*] posted on 11-11-2014 at 07:29


I have stored iodine in the plastic urine sample containers with the yellow screw lids that you get given at pathology centres for about three months in a refrigerator and they end up turning brown on the inside but none escapes in any way as far as i can see as the outsides are fine.
I have since transferred it though into a Schott Duran bottle with blue lid which seems to resist to the brown staining more effectively and i feel its safer in there.
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[*] posted on 13-11-2014 at 05:56


I long time ago I stored iodine crystals in a closed glass jar with other samples in a storage cabinet. The iodine sublimated and stained other jars and bottles. :( It was a mess to clean so be careful storing halogens.



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[*] posted on 13-11-2014 at 07:17


Back when I still had some iodine(about 15g), I stored it in a glass bottle(which formerly housed some sort of food product) that had a painted aluminium lid, but the metal lid had a glued-on paper liner on the inside. Paper doesn't seem to be bothered by it; it turned a bit brown but the iodine never escaped. I didn't know much about how to store it when I was first starting out with home chemistry, but it worked really well, so that's all that matters, really.



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[*] posted on 13-11-2014 at 11:16


My glass bottle with small, Teflon-lined phenolic cap (I did the lining myself) seems to be holding up extremely well.

EDIT: to iodine.

[Edited on 13-11-2014 by DrMario]
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