Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Getting HCl to react with copper metal?
Draeger
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 185
Registered: 31-1-2020
Location: North-Rhine Westfalia, Germany
Member Is Offline

Mood: Slowly getting ready for new projects

[*] posted on 20-4-2020 at 14:48
Getting HCl to react with copper metal?


I have a bit of HCl sitting on top of what supposedly looked like copper oxide. After I added HCl, though, I saw that there was now a red solid, which was copper, which was the most part of what was supposedly copper oxide. Now I have to get the HCl to react with the copper.

I was thinking about boiling off water from my very dilute 3% H2O2, but I don't have much of it, and it would also be really dangerous. So I was hoping that maybe a few drops with most of their water boiled off would be enough to get the reaction going, but I am really not sure how rigorous the decomposition would be if I overshot the goal. Or maybe there is an alternative to H2O2?




Collected elements:
Al, Cu, Ga, C (coal), S, Zn, Na

Collected compounds:

Inorganic:
NaOH; NaHCO3; MnCl2; MnCO3; CuSO4; FeSO4; aq. 30-33% HCl; aq. NaClO; aq. 9,5% ammonia; aq. 94-96% H2SO4; aq. 3% H2O2

Organic:
citric acid, sodium acetate, sodium citrate, petroleum, mineral oil
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Bedlasky
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 865
Registered: 15-4-2019
Location: Beleriand
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-4-2020 at 15:00


I think that 3% H2O2 should be fine. Mix solutions and heat it.

You can use any source of nitrate instead of H2O2.




If you are interested in aqueous inorganic chemistry look at https://colourchem.wordpress.com/main-page/

I can offer GC analysis of samples. Just U2U to me for more info.

"An old friend once told me something that gave me great comfort. Something he had read. He said that Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin never died. They simply became music." Dr. Robert Ford, Westworld
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
reactofurnace
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 72
Registered: 17-7-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: Volatile

[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 00:14


Is your goal to make Copper (II) chloride? If so the 3% H2O2 should work just fine. You could also bubble air into the mixture, however, this might be slow. In addition, I read on Wikipedia that the reaction of copper oxide and ammonium chloride is feasible (at temps of about 300deg celsius)
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Draeger
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 185
Registered: 31-1-2020
Location: North-Rhine Westfalia, Germany
Member Is Offline

Mood: Slowly getting ready for new projects

[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 10:00


Quote: Originally posted by Bedlasky  
I think that 3% H2O2 should be fine. Mix solutions and heat it.

You can use any source of nitrate instead of H2O2.

Could I safely boil off the solution that I have now? It still contains some H2O2.




Collected elements:
Al, Cu, Ga, C (coal), S, Zn, Na

Collected compounds:

Inorganic:
NaOH; NaHCO3; MnCl2; MnCO3; CuSO4; FeSO4; aq. 30-33% HCl; aq. NaClO; aq. 9,5% ammonia; aq. 94-96% H2SO4; aq. 3% H2O2

Organic:
citric acid, sodium acetate, sodium citrate, petroleum, mineral oil
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Bedlasky
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 865
Registered: 15-4-2019
Location: Beleriand
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 12:26


Yes, but do it outside, because of chlorine formation.



If you are interested in aqueous inorganic chemistry look at https://colourchem.wordpress.com/main-page/

I can offer GC analysis of samples. Just U2U to me for more info.

"An old friend once told me something that gave me great comfort. Something he had read. He said that Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin never died. They simply became music." Dr. Robert Ford, Westworld
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Draeger
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 185
Registered: 31-1-2020
Location: North-Rhine Westfalia, Germany
Member Is Offline

Mood: Slowly getting ready for new projects

[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 13:38


Quote: Originally posted by Bedlasky  
Yes, but do it outside, because of chlorine formation.

Is there some way I could prevent chlorine formation? I can't do it outside, and there is no well-ventilated place in my home, either.




Collected elements:
Al, Cu, Ga, C (coal), S, Zn, Na

Collected compounds:

Inorganic:
NaOH; NaHCO3; MnCl2; MnCO3; CuSO4; FeSO4; aq. 30-33% HCl; aq. NaClO; aq. 9,5% ammonia; aq. 94-96% H2SO4; aq. 3% H2O2

Organic:
citric acid, sodium acetate, sodium citrate, petroleum, mineral oil
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Texium
Administrator
Thread Moved
21-4-2020 at 14:05
Herr Haber
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 926
Registered: 29-1-2016
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 22-4-2020 at 11:31


In front of a window, remove anything metallic from the immediate surroundings, if possible blow a fan.
But I dont think you'll be producing a worrying amount of chlorine anyway. Just dont stay around in the room if you cant do it outside.




The spirit of adventure was upon me. Having nitric acid and copper, I had only to learn what the words 'act upon' meant. - Ira Remsen
View user's profile View All Posts By User
lordcookies24
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 78
Registered: 2-1-2019
Location: pluto
Member Is Offline

Mood: curious

[*] posted on 24-4-2020 at 19:32


I did this 2 years ago with 3% H₂O₂ to get CuCl₂ and it catalyzed it very well. Be sure to heat the solution well and if you have magnetic stirrer use it. Also I did this outside and it is a good thing I did because I might have heated it up a bit too much cause when I came outside after an hour my porch was well decorated with CuCl₂ crystals splattered all over:o.

[Edited on 25-4-2020 by lordcookies24]
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top