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Author: Subject: Single displacement reaction for lead?
Refinery
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[*] posted on 17-5-2020 at 13:07
Single displacement reaction for lead?


I was gonna make some lead acetate by single displacement reaction with copper acetate.

However, it looks like to me that on Youtube videos, the base metal does not corrode at all, but only the dissolved metal precipitates out. How is this possible, if the base metal is supposed to replace each ion pair?
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DraconicAcid
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[*] posted on 17-5-2020 at 13:13


It may look like that, but the copper does go into solution.



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unionised
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[*] posted on 17-5-2020 at 13:25


Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
It may look like that, but the copper does go into solution.

I presume you mean lead.
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[*] posted on 17-5-2020 at 13:27


Quote: Originally posted by unionised  
Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
It may look like that, but the copper does go into solution.

I presume you mean lead.


Yes, of course.




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Refinery
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[*] posted on 17-5-2020 at 13:28


By any reason it should do so.

I melt the lead and poured it through a sieve into water to maximize its surface area. I store it underwater to keep it from oxidizing until I get my reagents.

Ca Acetate + CuSO4 = CaSO4 + Cu Acetate
Cu Acetate + Pb = Pb Acetate + Cu

IMG_20200517_111006__01.jpg - 2.1MB
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[*] posted on 1-7-2020 at 10:09


Is there a viable method to separate Cu acetate and Pb acetate? Former appears to have much lower solubility, hence it could possibly be concentrated and then cooled down to crash out Cu?
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[*] posted on 2-7-2020 at 02:52


Quote: Originally posted by Refinery  
Is there a viable method to separate Cu acetate and Pb acetate? Former appears to have much lower solubility, hence it could possibly be concentrated and then cooled down to crash out Cu?


Just use an excess of lead and let it sit until the solution is no longer blue.
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[*] posted on 2-7-2020 at 04:35


I presume this takes quite a long time?
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