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Author: Subject: Inorganic projects
fdnjj6
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[*] posted on 12-8-2020 at 00:00
Inorganic projects


So I love organic chemistry because I can easily do multi step reactions to build up a molecule from something basic from the hardware store. A good example is my benzocaine synthesis starting from toluene.

Are there some good/fun inorganic synthesis that aren't just, add this salt to this salt and mix with with solution? I used to do stuff like making zinc sulfate to turn pennies into silver and gold but I feel like that is as far as I can go as far as cooler projects.
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[*] posted on 12-8-2020 at 05:33


I have done quite a few interesting things:
- Make Na3H2IO6 (sodium orthoperiodate) from NaI and NaOH by bubbline Cl2 through this solution and working up the material.
- Make KIO4 from KI and KOH in a very similar way as described above.
- Make KIO3 and KBrO3 from KI and KBr by means of electrolysis, using a tiny amount of hexavalent chromium for cell efficiency, which can be made from easy to obtain chrome alum and bleach.
- Make interesting complexes, such as hexammine nickel(II) perchlorate, tris(en) nickel(II) perchlorate, similar cobalt complexes.
- Make KICl4 from HCl and KIO3.

All of the above-mentioned chemicals are interesting to have around and for doing further experiments. Making these chemicals can be done well in a reasonably equipped home lab, but making them (and especially the work-up of them) is beyond the simple beginner level of mixing compounds A and B and isolating the product of the reaction.




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Want to wonder? Look at https://woelen.homescience.net
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Bedlasky
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[*] posted on 12-8-2020 at 22:04


Try preparation of sodium hypomanganate. It's quite rare and unstable compound. I made it in solution and compare its properties with manganate:

https://colourchem.wordpress.com/2019/07/13/manganese-redox-...

Hugh made hypomanganate by dry method. I not try it yet, but I plan it:

https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=14...

Molybdenum have very spectacular redox and complex chemistry. I publish article abou redox chemistry:

https://colourchem.wordpress.com/2020/02/15/reduction-of-mol...

When you add zinc powder in to the solution, be patient and add it in very small portions (if you add too much zinc at once, there will be complete reduction of molybdate without transition states).

Try preparations of potassium chlorochromate, potassium trichromate and chromium trioxide. The first two are well described on Woelen's website. You can find there also synthesis of chromium peroxide complexes, which are also interesting:

https://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/exps/index_trans...





If you are interested in aqueous inorganic chemistry look at https://colourchem.wordpress.com/main-page/

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macckone
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[*] posted on 13-8-2020 at 08:27


Some challenging things to do with inorganic chem is converting OTC materials to ACS grade.

I like working with ferrite compositions, particle sizes are very very important.
There are also various high temperature superconductors (high is relative, I am talking liquid nitrogen).
These are areas where a home chemist might actually discover something because there are infinite combinations that make sense theoretically but they don't all pan out in reality. In fact most don't. Some of those may simply be because the manufacturing conditions aren't quite right.

To do this kind of work right you need to use a microscope and have access to x-ray diffraction equipment but it isn't absolutely necessary. You can send samples off for analysis. The one thing you absolutely need though is a sintering furnace. Most labs use a tube furnace where oxygen, nitrogen and argon can be used to create various conditions and temperature profiles.
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[*] posted on 15-8-2020 at 01:15


I have a fun project on my todo-list.

Making a YBCO high temperature superconductor.
You have probably seen when they place a magnet on top of a cold YBCO superconductor and it floats in the air and spins.
There is a youtube video explaining the process.
One needs Yttrium nitrate, Barium nitrate, copper nitrate and citric acid.
Yttrium nitrate can be substituted by Yttrium oxide in water and adding little nitric acid making Yttrium nitrate in the solution.
I add a PDF explaining the process if someone wants to try it.
Here is a link to the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLFaa6RPJIU

Attachment: Synthesis of high temperature superconductor using citrate pyrolysis.pdf (3.1MB)
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fdnjj6
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[*] posted on 15-8-2020 at 02:04


Quote: Originally posted by Mateo_swe  
I have a fun project on my todo-list.

Making a YBCO high temperature superconductor.
You have probably seen when they place a magnet on top of a cold YBCO superconductor and it floats in the air and spins.
There is a youtube video explaining the process.
One needs Yttrium nitrate, Barium nitrate, copper nitrate and citric acid.
Yttrium nitrate can be substituted by Yttrium oxide in water and adding little nitric acid making Yttrium nitrate in the solution.
I add a PDF explaining the process if someone wants to try it.
Here is a link to the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLFaa6RPJIU


I watched NileRed make this too. Good luck! It seems a bit difficult and too advanced for my current lab.
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[*] posted on 15-8-2020 at 18:51


In my estimation, there are 2 tricky things in the YBCO synthesis: the oxygen flow and the heating. If you can get an O2 cylinder with a proper regulator this should work. Tube furnaces aren't trivial to build, but it is possible with some Kanthal wire, insulation, and a thermocouple.



As below, so above.
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Mateo_swe
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[*] posted on 18-8-2020 at 11:57


You need to have a O2 cylinder or other way of supplying a slow but long time stream of oxygen.
An electric oven capable of supplying around 1000°C is also needed but it doesnt need to be a tube furnace.
I will use a DIY electric oven made of high temp insulating bricks, kanthal heating element 3000W and a temp regulator with SSR and a thermocouple.
The oven can be used for many interesting things from hi-temp reactions to melting aluminium and copper.

I have been thinking of building a tube furnace also.
I have these 70cm long alumina tubes with an inside diameter of around 15mm.
I might be able to make something with these tubes and kanthal heating wire.
The tubes can handle the heat but making a good working tube furnace is not a easy project.
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